Marysville shooting | KUOW News and Information

Marysville shooting

Credit Marysville School District

Marysville-Pilchuck High School is getting ready to open its new cafeteria.

The school hasn’t used its original cafeteria since 2014, when a student opened fire in the middle of lunch period. Hundreds of young people witnessed the student killing four friends and then himself.


Bryan Soriano holds a photo of him with daughter Gia before her first and only Homecoming dance.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Before the first anniversary of the shooting at Marysville-Pilchuck High School, some family members of the victims appeared publicly to press for access to records related to the case.  

Last Oct. 24, freshman Jaylen Fryberg shot five students in the school cafeteria; one survived. Fryberg then shot himself.

Students put flowers on a memorial for the shooting victims at Marysville-Pilchuck High School in October 2014.
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

The father of the shooter at Marysville-Pilchuck High School is scheduled to go on trial in a Seattle federal court next week.

Raymond Fryberg, Jr. faces charges of unlawful firearms possession. But his lawyers say any mention of how his gun was used would prejudice the jury.

Photos of the students shot at Marysville-Pilchuck High School are seen in a memorial last year.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

  • The aunt of a teenage girl who dated the Marysville-Pilchuck High School shooter says releasing her text messages could inflame the community and haunt her for the rest of her life. 
  • The Everett Herald KUOW and other media organizations have filed briefs advocating for the texts to be made public.
  • Her request is expected to be heard in Snohomish County Superior Court on Thursday. 

Advocates for a teenage girl caught up in the investigation of last year’s shootings at Marysville-Pilchuck High School say releasing her personal text messages from that time would re-traumatize her and potentially subject her to threats and reprisals.

The girl did not attend the high school but was the former girlfriend of Jaylen Fryberg and friends with his victims.

Art in the halls at Marysville-Pilchuck High School following the mass shooting last October.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

As students at Marysville-Pilchuck High School head back to class, the devastating shooting last fall will return to headlines.

A report scheduled to be released Monday is said to contain horrific details from hundreds of students who were in the cafeteria that day.

Guns line the walls of the firearms reference collection at the Washington Metropolitan Police Department headquarters in Washington, D.C.
AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

For years, Tulalip tribal officials have been pressing for better access to criminal databases. Then the shooting at Marysville-Pilchuck High School last fall made the reason all too clear.

Tribal records should have blocked the purchase of the gun used in the shooting. But the records never traveled the seven miles between the Tulalip Tribal Court and the Snohomish County Sheriff’s Office.

The Tulalip Tribe leaders perform at Marysville-Pilchuck High School on Sunday, Oct. 26, 2014 -- two days after Jaylen Fryberg shot five students and himself in the cafeteria during lunch.
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

The arrest of a Tulalip man has put a spotlight on possible gaps in the background check system for gun buyers.

The protection order that would have blocked Raymond Fryberg, Jr., from buying a handgun was never entered in a state database. His son later used the gun in the shootings at Marysville-Pilchuck High School.

Jaylen Fryberg, the 15-year-old who shot five friends in the cafeteria at Marysville-Pilchuck High School in October.. Jaylen and four of the friends died.
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The father of a Tulalip Tribes teenager was charged Tuesday with illegally possessing the gun his son used to kill four classmates at Marysville-Pilchuck High School.

The FBI said in found that the father, Raymond Fryberg, lied on federal documents when he purchased five guns from a Marysville gun dealer – including the pistol used in the school shooting on Oct. 25, 2014.

Marysville Pilchuck High School, the site of a fatal school shooting in October, was evacuated Wednesday afternoon due to a bomb threat, school officials said.

Students were released because it was the end of the day. Marysville police tweeted that students who do not drive to school should be picked up at Shoultes Gospel Hall at 51st Avenue Northeast and 116th Street Northeast in Marysville.

Shoultes is where parents were instructed to pick up their children on Oct. 24, after freshman Jaylen Fryberg fatally shot five friends and wounded another in the high school cafeteria. Jaylen then shot and killed himself.

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A fourth victim has died of his injuries from the Marysville-Pilchuck High School shooting.

Andrew Fryberg, 15, died of a gunshot wound to the head on Friday evening, according to Harborview Medical Center – exactly two weeks after the Oct. 24 shooting.

Jeannie Yandel talks with writer and journalist Andrew Solomon about what he learned from the parents of the shooters at Sandy Hook and Columbine and whether "bad parenting" is to blame. 

Jeannie Yandel talks with Natalie Snyder, who was wounded in the 1996 shooting at Frontier Middle School in Moses Lake, Wash., about the long process of healing after a trauma.

Crowds cheer Marysville HS buses
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Marcie Sillman speaks with Matt Remle, Native American liaison for the Marysville School District, about helping students adjust to the return to Marysville-Pilchuck High School 10 days after the shooting. 

Frank Rivas, Marysville
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Tuesday is the first day of actual classes for students of Marysville-Pilchuck High School. On Monday, students were bused to the school for a shortened day. It was the first time since the shooting on October 24 that the school community had come together.

Amy Radil

The Marysville-Pilchuck High School shootings occurred as Washington voters prepared to vote on two gun initiatives.

No one argues that either of these initiatives would have prevented the school shooting, but people on both sides of the debate say the incident could still weigh on voters’ minds.

Fourteen year-old Shaylee Chuckulnaskit died just before 5 p.m.Friday from her injuries.

Balloons and flowers at an impromptu memorial at Marysville Pilchuck High School the Monday after a school shooting on Friday, Oct. 24.
KUOW Photo/Ann Dornfeld

Jeannie Yandel talks with journalist Dave Cullen, the author of the book "Columbine," about how he saw false explanations for the Columbine shooting affect national policy, and why he urges media and friends of Marysville community members alike to take their time trying to work through the causes of the shooting.

Flickr Photo/Joannie Grebe (CC-BY-NC)

The Ebola nurse in Maine: rational or selfish? Is it ever OK to be sarcastic right after a school shooting? Does a confusing ballot mean an unpredictable election? Plus, Bill Radke explodes over leaf blowers. All these topics and more are discussed with this week's guests: Knute Berger, Eli Sanders and Joni Balter.

A gun violence prevention meeting took place at Seattle City Hall on Wednesday. The event had been planned long in advance, but the recent shooting deaths at Marysville-Pilchuck High School highlight its significance. KUOW’s John O’Brien reports.

Students put flowers on a memorial for the shooting victims at Marysville-Pilchuck High School in October 2014.
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Marcie Sillman hears from sociologist Katherine Newman, author of "Rampage: The Social Roots of School Shootings," about how communities can help students to recognize and report warning signs of a potential school shooting.

KUOW Photo/Ann Dornfeld / KUOW

Even though the school doors are closed all week, there’s a steady stream of visitors to Marysville Pilchuck High.

They weave ribbons through the fence that runs along the school field.

Gently lean one more bouquet of flowers between hundreds like it.

Jaylen Fryberg, the 15-year-old who shot five friends in the cafeteria at Marysville-Pilchuck High School in October.. Jaylen and four of the friends died.
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Jaylen Fryberg had texted the five friends he shot on Friday to lunch, Snohomish County Sheriff Ty Trenary said on Monday.

At 10:40 a.m. on Friday, those friends – two boys who were cousins and three girls – were at the lunch table with Fryberg, Trenary said, when he shot them each in the head.

Marysville shooting
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Ross Reynolds speaks with Dr. Peter Langman, author of "Why Kids Kill: Inside the Minds of School Shooters," about how communities search for explanations after a school shooting.

The shooting at Marysville-Pilchuck High School Friday comes as Washington voters are about to decide two competing gun-related ballot measures.

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A 14-year-old girl wounded in last week’s high school shooting has died, raising the number of fatalities to three.

Officials at Providence Regional Medical Center Everett say 14-year-old Gia Soriano died on Sunday night.

Deborah Wang / KUOW

The chain link fence at the front gate of Marysville-Pilchuck High School has become an unofficial gathering spot for those in grief. They bring bouquets of flowers and hang them on the fence, they tie on balloons, and they put up posters with the names and photographs not just of the victims, but also of the alleged shooter.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Friday’s shooting was the subtext of everything that was said during Sunday services at the Grove Church in Marysville. Pastor Andrew Munoz spoke from a podium lit with candles and littered with strips of paper containing prayers and messages for the victims of the shooting.

KUOW Photo

The Snohomish County medical examiner has still not identified the teen girl who died in Friday's shooting at Marysville Pilchuck High School on Friday.

Police have interviewed more than 100 eyewitnesses to the shooting at the school's cafeteria.

KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Four young people are in intensive care following a shooting in a Marysville high school cafeteria. And two young people are dead.

One, a girl. The other, the alleged shooter. Police have yet to confirm his identity.

KUOW reporter Carolyn Adolph reports.

Guns line the walls of the firearms reference collection at the Washington Metropolitan Police Department headquarters in Washington, D.C.
AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

When we talk about guns, rarely do we speak with reluctant gun owners, particularly parents who have decided that owning a firearm is safer than not and who struggle with how to discuss gun safety with their kids.