marijuana

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Washington Governor Jay Inslee pushed for a higher minimum wage and increased education funding during his State of the State Address this week. The state legislature kicked off its 2014 session. Also, Boeing Machinists Union President Tom Wroblewski announced his retirement.

We review these stories and more with news analyst Joni Balter, Crosscut's Knute Berger and The Stranger's Eli Sanders. Plus, we hear from Live Wire host Luke Burbank.

Flickr Photo/North Cascades National Park

Ross Reynolds talks with Alison Holcomb, ACLU's drug policy director, and Candice Bock, government relations advocate for the Association of Washington Cities, about state Attorney General Bob Ferguson's position on local governments' pot moratoriums. On Thursday, Ferguson said state law does not prevent local governments from regulating or banning marijuana businesses in their jurisdictions.

One of the hottest topics before the Washington legislature this year is how to regulate the medical marijuana marketplace.

Leaders of the Yakama Nation in central Washington say they see little benefit to sales or farming of legalized marijuana on their traditional lands.

Some U.S. states are viewing the legalization of marijuana as a chance to gain new sources of tax revenue. Several states allow its use for medical reasons; Colorado has approved its recreational use, and Washington will follow suit this year.

But the decriminalization of pot also stands to remove a funding source for police: property forfeitures from drug dealers. Such funding is "going up in smoke," The Wall Street Journal reports.

For many users and advocates of marijuana, the boom in the West Coast growing industry may be all good and groovy. But in California, critics say the recent explosion of the marijuana industry along the state's North Coast — a region called the "emerald triangle" — could put a permanent buzz kill on struggling salmon populations.

AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Machinists cast their votes tonight on Boeing's contract extension. Seattle Mayor Ed Murray proposes raising the minimum hourly wage for city employees to $15. Legal marijuana enters 2014 under a hazy cloud of questions.

Steve Scher reviews the week's big stories and looks ahead to 2014 with Crosscut's Knute Berger, The Stranger's Eli Sanders, and C.R. Douglas of Q13 Fox. We also get some 2014 predictions from Live Wire host Luke Burbank.

KUOW Photo/Ross Reynolds

At Solstice, a nondescript warehouse in Seattle’s Sodo neighborhood, four people in white lab coats sit at tables in a brightly lit room.

Colorado Sees First Legal Recreational Pot Sales

Jan 2, 2014
Flickr Photo/Dann Cove (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman hears from Colorado Public Radio reporter Ben Markus about the world's first recreational marijuana sales that happened yesterday in Colorado.

Veterans who smoke marijuana to cope with post-traumatic stress disorder may be onto something. There's growing evidence that pot can affect brain circuits involved in PTSD.

Credit Katherine Hitt / Flickr

State officials promise that Washington’s new legal marijuana market will be airtight, and that plants will be tracked “from seed to sale.”

Flickr Photo/Goodiez

David Hyde talks with John Davis, medical pot advocate and CEO of Northwest Patient Resource Center, about his take on the liquor control board's recommendations for medical pot regulations.

Flickr Photo/Crash Zone Photography

This week, Seattle Police announced new use of force guidelines that will take effect Jan. 1. Also starting in the new year, customers will be able to buy pot over the counter, and a report this week indicates that locals are consuming a lot more pot than the state had initially estimated.

We review these stories and more with news analyst Joni Balter, The Stranger's Eli Sanders and Crosscut's Knute Berger. Plus, Live Wire host Luke Burbank checks in from Christmas City, U.S.A.

Flickr Photo/Wiros

David Hyde talks with University of Washington addiction researcher Roger Roffman about the health risks facing heavy pot users and what pot addiction looks like.

If there is such a thing, the typical pot smoker in Washington is a white male, 35 or younger with some college education. And he smokes a lot more weed than anyone thought.

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