marijuana

The Washington legislature adjourned its 60-day session just before midnight Thursday night.

Flickr Photo/Kamera Kizi (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Recreational marijuana is legal – for adults. But it’s clear that the movement toward legalization is having repercussions for teenagers too.

Federal authorities have said they will be monitoring whether Washington’s legal marijuana supply makes its way to underage users. It’s one of the indicators that they say could lead them to intervene in the state’s experiment.

AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Small business owners voice concerns on a proposed $15 minimum wage, and the state issues its first marijuana business license to a grower from Spokane. Seattle also gets a glimpse into its future waterfront plans

Steve Scher reviews these stories and more with Eli Sanders of The Stranger, news analyst Joni Balter, Peter Jackson of the Everett Herald and Livewire's Luke Burbank.

Washington’s voter-approved effort to legalize recreational marijuana reached a major milestone.

AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

David Hyde hears from Sean Green about being the first producer-processor to receive a recreational marijuana license in the Washington state.

Then KUOW's Amy Radil tells us what this means for the recreational pot industry moving forward. 

AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

David Hyde talks with Ethan Nadelmann, executive director of Drug Policy Alliance, about how he thinks the national debate has changed after Washington legalized marijuana and what he sees as the future of crime and drugs.

Flickr Photo/Scott Beale (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marijuana growers who want to sell their products in Seattle will have to pay business license tax to the city.

On Monday, the City Council voted not to give pot growers a tax break reserved for farmers.

Flickr Photo/Coleen Whitfield (CC BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde talks with Tacoma Mayor Marilyn Strickland about her request to Governor Jay Inslee and state lawmakers to share a portion of future tax revenue from legal marijuana.

Colorado opened its first pot stores in January, and adults in Washington state will be able to walk into a store and buy marijuana this summer. But this legalization of recreational marijuana is taking place without much information on the possible health effects.

Within the next year, marijuana taxes will start arriving in Washington state coffers. But how much money can the state realistically expect to take in from legal, recreational pot sales?

The Lodo Wellness Center in Denver has been selling medical marijuana for several years. But since Jan. 1, when marijuana in Colorado officially moved from underground to behind the counter, the center has also been selling legal, recreational pot.

A majority of Americans now say they support full legalization, and the trend is spreading to other states.

Meanwhile, the public health community is warning of a potential safety problem: more people driving while stoned. But health officials and law enforcement don't yet have the data or the tools to address the concern.

This summer marijuana stores will open for business across Washington.

Applicants to grow recreational pot in Washington could have their state licenses in hand two weeks from now.

Marijuana businesses in Washington may soon be able to open a bank account. 

Oregon lawmakers are considering two very different approaches to regulating marijuana this month.

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