marijuana

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Today, some 30,000 people will converge in Denver, Colo. for the 5th annual Cannabis Cup, a marijuana festival and tradeshow. It's the first time the event is being held after legal marijuana sales went into effect January 1 of this year. To learn more about the event, we're joined by Ricardo Baca. He's the editor of "The Cannabist" blog at the Denver Post. Thanks so much for being with us, Ricardo.

RICARDO BACA: Hey. Thank you.

Flickr Photo/Coleen Whitfield (CC BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Dominic Corva, executive director of the Center for the Study of Cannabis and Social Policy, about the implications for pot bans and moratoriums in Washington state.

Young adults who smoke marijuana at least once a week showed changes in the size and shape of two key brain regions, according to a new study of 20 pot smokers and 20 non-pot smokers between 18 and 25.

This is the first time recreational marijuana use has been connected to significant brain changes.

The findings, a collaboration between Northwestern University and Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, were published in The Journal of Neuroscience.

Ever since recreational marijuana became legal in Colorado in January, some school officials say they’re seeing more students using it. They also say heavy weed smokers generally miss more class and get lower grades.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Jenny Brundin of Colorado Public Radio looks at a pilot program at a high school in outside of Denver that is now offering drug treatment alongside of biology and Spanish.

Some drivers from Washington and Colorado say they're being targeted by police when they cross into Idaho.

KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Ross Reynolds talks with academic and activist Roger Roffman about his involvement with marijuana and public policy for 45 years. His latest book is "Marijuana Nation: One Man’s Chronicle of America Getting High: From Vietnam to Legalization."

The timeline for when Washington’s first marijuana retail stores will open has slipped from June to early July, according to state Liquor Control Board staff.

All In The Family: Bringing Cannabis Business To Port Townsend

Mar 26, 2014
Flickr Photo/Patrick Nelson (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Port Townsend father-son duo, Martin Gay and Dakota Sandoval, eagerly anticipate the fate of their marijuana business as Washington State Liquor Board starts issuing licenses next month.

Gay and Sandoval’s business, Jefferson County Cannabis Company, was among more than 7,000 applications that were submitted in December to legally grow pot in the state.

KUOW Photo/Ross Reynolds

Ross Reynolds talks with Bellevue Mayor Claudia Balducci about a possible ban on marijuana businesses in the fifth largest city in Washington.

Flickr Photo/Scott Beale (CC BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde talks with Alison Holcomb, ACLU of Washington's criminal justice director, about her recent trip to the United Nations.

Report: Pot Cases Plunge After Marijuana Legalization In Washington

Mar 20, 2014
Flickr Photo/Brett Levin (CC BY-NC-ND)

Steve Scher talks with Mark Cooke, policy advocate with the ACLU of Washington, about the organization's findings that the number of marijuana possession filings have dropped significantly since Washington legalized pot.

Washington Governor Jay Inslee says he’s surprised and disappointed medical marijuana regulation died in the state legislature this year.

Flickr Photo/Cannabis Culture (CC BY-NC-ND)

Steve Scher talks with UCLA public policy professor Mark Kleiman about why Washington and Colorado are taking the wrong approach to legalizing marijuana. He says the current system could lead to increased drug abuse among minors.

State lawmakers adjourn in Olympia, Seattle's $15 minimum wage gets more scrutiny and President Obama tries comedy to pitch the Affordable Care Act to young Americans. 

Steve Scher reviews these stories and more with Eli Sanders of The Stranger, news analyst Joni Balter, Crosscut's Knute Berger and Livewire host Luke Burbank.

Flickr Photo/Rusty Blazenhoff (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Jenny Durkan, U.S. Attorney for the Western District of Washington, about the state failing to pass medical pot regulations and what the federal government might do about it.

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