How To Market Marijuana

Apr 20, 2015

Marcie Sillman talks with Harvard School of Business professor John Quelch about marketing marijuana.

It appears the days are numbered for Washington’s sprawling and largely unregulated medical marijuana marketplace.

Flickr Photo/North Cascades National Park

Marcie Sillman talks with KUOW Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins about the future of medical pot in Washington state. 

California is four years into a historic drought, and water for human use is vying with the water needs of wildlife, such as threatened salmon.

In parts of northern California, an explosive and unregulated increase in marijuana cultivation is contributing to the problem. Now, a study says the impact of pot grows on fish-bearing streams is threatening their survival.

Researchers monitoring water levels in streams in Humboldt and Mendocino Counties last summer say the water impacts of cannabis grow operations are dramatic.

Legislation to bring together Washington’s two dueling marijuana systems is moving forward. As KUOW’s Amy Radil reports, the challenge may come in deciding which medical dispensaries get to stay open.

Flickr Photo/North Cascades National Park

Ross Reynolds talks to Alexandra Gutierrez of the Alaska Public Radio Network about the Alaska State Legislature's debates over new marijuana regulation laws.

The divide between Republicans and Democrats on pot politics is narrowing, President Barack Obama said in an interview Monday.

Oregon's pot law allows up to four pot plants per home.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Marcie Sillman talks to Roger Roffman, University of Washington professor emeritus, about new legislation that would allow researchers in Washington state to apply for a marijuana research license.

marijuana joint pot
Flickr Photo/Dann Cove (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman speaks with University of Washington researcher Kevin Haggerty, who says confusion over the state's marijuana law gets in the way of important conversations about teen drug use. 

Josh Etzler, left, and colleague Jeff Stewart break for lunch in Tulalip. Etzler says marijuana retail stores could be undercut by tribes.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

In Les Parks’ perfect world, the Tulalip Tribes would not only legalize marijuana but fund research into its medical benefits.  

“I see Tulalip leading the country and being on this frontier for what this plant can do for mankind, basically,” said Parks, the Tulalips’ vice chairman and a longtime supporter of legalization, speaking from the tribe’s gleaming new government building, with sweeping views over Puget Sound.

Ross Reynolds speaks with North Bonneville Mayor Don Stevens about their city's pot store. It will become the  first government-owned pot store in the nation, possibly the world, when it opens on Saturday.

Legal recreational marijuana will become a reality in Oregon on July 1.

That's expected to create new market opportunities for large-scale indoor marijuana producers who rely on powerful grow lights.

“They’re energy hogs. They use an ungodly amount of electricity,” says Ashland City Administrator Dave Kanner.

Alaska's voter initiative making marijuana legal takes effect Tuesday, placing Alaska alongside Colorado and Washington as the three U.S. states where recreational marijuana is legal. The new law means people over age 21 can consume small amounts of pot — if they can find it. It's still illegal to sell marijuana.

"You can still give people marijuana, but you can't buy it — or even barter for it," Alaska Public Media's Alexandra Gutierrez reports. "So, it's a pretty legally awkward spot. That probably won't stop people from acquiring it, though."

Like many schools across Colorado, Arapahoe Ridge High School in Boulder has seen an increase in overall drug incidents since recreational marijuana became legal.

While public schools aren't required to report marijuana incidents separately from other drugs such as cocaine, evidence compiled by Rocky Mountain PBS I-News suggests more students are using marijuana.

Flickr Photo/Goodiez (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with state Sen. Steve Hobbs, D-Lake Stevens, about a bill he has introduced that would add PTSD to the list of conditions that could be treated by medical marijuana.

Reynolds also talks with Harborview Medical Center psychiatrist Dr. Doug Zatzick about marijuana as a treatment for PTSD.