marijuana

marijuana
Flickr Photo/North Cascades National Park

Ross Reynolds talks to Alexandra Gutierrez of the Alaska Public Radio Network about the Alaska State Legislature's debates over new marijuana regulation laws.

The divide between Republicans and Democrats on pot politics is narrowing, President Barack Obama said in an interview Monday.

Oregon's pot law allows up to four pot plants per home.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Marcie Sillman talks to Roger Roffman, University of Washington professor emeritus, about new legislation that would allow researchers in Washington state to apply for a marijuana research license.

marijuana joint pot
Flickr Photo/Dann Cove (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman speaks with University of Washington researcher Kevin Haggerty, who says confusion over the state's marijuana law gets in the way of important conversations about teen drug use. 

Josh Etzler, left, and colleague Jeff Stewart break for lunch in Tulalip. Etzler says marijuana retail stores could be undercut by tribes.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

In Les Parks’ perfect world, the Tulalip Tribes would not only legalize marijuana but fund research into its medical benefits.  

“I see Tulalip leading the country and being on this frontier for what this plant can do for mankind, basically,” said Parks, the Tulalips’ vice chairman and a longtime supporter of legalization, speaking from the tribe’s gleaming new government building, with sweeping views over Puget Sound.

Ross Reynolds speaks with North Bonneville Mayor Don Stevens about their city's pot store. It will become the  first government-owned pot store in the nation, possibly the world, when it opens on Saturday.

Legal recreational marijuana will become a reality in Oregon on July 1.

That's expected to create new market opportunities for large-scale indoor marijuana producers who rely on powerful grow lights.

“They’re energy hogs. They use an ungodly amount of electricity,” says Ashland City Administrator Dave Kanner.

Alaska's voter initiative making marijuana legal takes effect Tuesday, placing Alaska alongside Colorado and Washington as the three U.S. states where recreational marijuana is legal. The new law means people over age 21 can consume small amounts of pot — if they can find it. It's still illegal to sell marijuana.

"You can still give people marijuana, but you can't buy it — or even barter for it," Alaska Public Media's Alexandra Gutierrez reports. "So, it's a pretty legally awkward spot. That probably won't stop people from acquiring it, though."

Like many schools across Colorado, Arapahoe Ridge High School in Boulder has seen an increase in overall drug incidents since recreational marijuana became legal.

While public schools aren't required to report marijuana incidents separately from other drugs such as cocaine, evidence compiled by Rocky Mountain PBS I-News suggests more students are using marijuana.

Flickr Photo/Goodiez (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with state Sen. Steve Hobbs, D-Lake Stevens, about a bill he has introduced that would add PTSD to the list of conditions that could be treated by medical marijuana.

Reynolds also talks with Harborview Medical Center psychiatrist Dr. Doug Zatzick about marijuana as a treatment for PTSD.

marijuana
Flickr Photo/North Cascades National Park

Ross Reynolds talks to Anthony Broadman, a partner with the Seattle law firm Galanda Broadman, about how local tribes can sell marijuana on reservations.

Left to right: Bob Ferguson, Pete Holmes, Joni Balter and Larry Hubbell at a marijuana forum at Seattle University.
Courtesy of Danielle Potter

In 2012 Washington voters’ approved Initiative 502. Passage of the measure set in place a licensing and regulation scheme and rescinded state laws criminalizing recreational marijuana use and possession. It legalized the production, sale and taxation of small amounts of marijuana-related products for adults 21 and over.

marijuana joint pot
Flickr Photo/Dann Cove (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Roger Roffman, University of Washington professor emeritus, about the links between high potency marijuana and psychotic episodes.

When voters in four U.S. states — Colorado, Washington, Alaska and Oregon — approved recreational marijuana sales, part of the appeal was the promise of a new revenue source to buoy cash-strapped cities and states.

But tensions are growing in those four states over how the tax rewards from pot sales should be divided. Local governments want to get what they say is their share of pot tax revenue.

The Washington state Senate voted unanimously Wednesday to make hemp farming legal. The measure now goes to the state House for further consideration.

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