marijuana

Taxes from marijuana sales continue to outpace expectations in Oregon. The state Department of Revenue Wednesday said the state has collected nearly $7 million in pot taxes so far this year.

Public opinion on marijuana has risen dramatically over the last couple of decades. In the mid-1990s, only around 25 percent of Americans thought pot should be legal, according to Gallup.

Today, it's around 58 percent.

Voters in two Oregon counties will decide in the May primary whether to allow marijuana-related businesses. County commissioners banned marijuana retailers and growers in unincorporated parts of Klamath and Grant counties last year.

When Tim McClure was 42 years old, he was convicted of illegally growing marijuana on his ranch near The Dalles, Oregon. And at this time last year, McClure was living with the shame of being a felon.

"I don't think it's the measure of me as a man,” McClure said 2015.

Now that recreational marijuana is legal in Oregon, some activists and entrepreneurs are taking the next step: They're running for office themselves.

Pot-infused edibles are big sellers in states that have legalized marijuana. The problem is, it's been tough to measure and regulate the potency of these ganja-laced gummy bears, lollies and brownies.

A lot of visitors to Colorado figure they might give the state's good ganja a try, but they might not be prepared for the effects. When it comes to bad weed trips, out-of-staters have been doing much worse than Colorado residents and are going to the ER more often since recreational sales of marijuana began in 2014.

Oregon and Washington state lawmakers are making another try at introducing a new crop to the Northwest: Industrial hemp, the non-drug cousin of marijuana.

'Week in Review' panel Mike McGinn, Joni Balter, Bill Radke and Paul Guppy.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

What's the way to help homeless citizens and protect the rights of neighborhood residents? Also, Seattleites hiring private security guards – necessary protection or needless fear? And is it time to extend marijuana rights further?

Bill Radke looks for answers with former Mayor Mike McGinn, Washington Policy Center’s Paul Guppy and Seattle Channel’s Joni Balter.

The Record: Monday, Jan. 25, Full Show

Jan 25, 2016
KUOW Photo

We've had legal marijuana for a while -- is it time for pot cafes? Have you seen the crowdsourced mao of Seattle for people with disabilities? And what is Macklemore going for with his new song “White Privilege II” – a nine-minute monument to inner conflict?

Listen to the full show above or check out the individual stories:

A line extends outside a crowded pot cafe on 'High Street' in Amsterdam.
Flickr Photo/Michael Delaney (CC BY-SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/di4HNo

Public consumption of pot continues to be illegal, but a new bill would let Seattle and other cities opt out of the ban and open up pot cafes. 

Seattle City Attorney Pete Holmes backs the effort.

Is the tax on legal marijuana in Washington too high?

Seattle officials say the city’s 24 marijuana delivery businesses are illegal and now outnumber its 19 licensed stores. To combat the problem, Seattle officials are pledging a crackdown as well as a new legal delivery option.

Solstice's Joe Santucci says new technologies reduce the need for power-hungry lights. But they aren't totally embracing LEDs.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Marijuana growers in the Northwest are going to use a lot of electricity in the next 20 years, enough to power up to 200,000 homes, according to a recent forecast.

That’s because a lighting module to grow four marijuana plants takes as much energy as 29 refrigerators.

Editors' note, Feb. 1, 2016: On Jan. 20, we reported on a statement from the American Psychological Association that a research paper, "Chronic Adolescent Marijuana Use as a Risk Factor for Physical and Mental Health Problems in Young Adult Men," had a statistical error. The APA now says that statement, which was titled "APA Corrects Article Regarding Teen Marijuana Use," should not have said there was an error in the paper. Jim Sliwa, a spokesman for the APA, told NPR: "There was no error.

Pages