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Malaysia Airlines

A final report on Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 says the fate of the vanished aircraft may never be known, despite years of searching and more than $150 million in costs.

The report, which includes hundreds of pages of technical appendices, contains new details about the search. Perhaps most significantly, it provided more detail about a crew member's flight simulator that contained a route similar to the one investigators think the missing plane took.

Who can solve the mystery of flight MH370?

Aug 1, 2016

Bill Radke speaks with Seattleite Blaine Alan Gibson about the mysterious disappearance of Malaysian Airlines Flight 370 over the Gulf of Thailand in 2014. Gibson thinks he can solve the mystery. 

Malaysian officials say what they believe to be airplane seat cushions and window panes have been found washed up on Reunion Island, the same spot in the Indian Ocean where a wing fragment was found last week. The Malaysians say that fragment is from the missing Flight MH370; French investigators say they're almost — but not quite — certain.

The piece of a jet that's believed to be from a Boeing 777 — the same model of a Malaysia Airlines plane that went missing last year — is now in France, where it will be examined in a government laboratory near Toulose.

After the large piece of debris was discovered on the French island of Reunion in the Indian Ocean this week, Malaysia Airlines said it "is almost certainly part of a Boeing 777."

The airline also says that MH370 "is believed to be the only 777 to have crashed south of the equator since the jet came into service 20 years ago."

This post was updated at 5:00 p.m. ET.

Audie Cornish talks with reporter Noah Sneider, who's at the crash site of the Malaysian airliner in eastern Ukraine's Donetsk region.

This post was last updated at 6:40 p.m. ET.

A Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777 with 298 passengers and crew aboard has crashed in eastern Ukraine in an area of the country that has been wracked by a separatist insurgency.

Flickr Photo/Adventures of KM&G-Morris

Ross Reynolds talks to Joseph Janes, University of Washington professor from the information school, about the origins of the black box in airplanes. Janes is host of the podcast "Documents That Changed The World."

Australian officials are dismissing reports by a marine exploration company that wreckage from the missing Malaysia Airlines jet might have been located in the Bay of Bengal, thousands of miles north of the search area where the plane is presumed to have gone down.

GeoResonance, a private firm based in Australia, said earlier this week that in its own search for Flight 370, which disappeared from radar March 8, it had had found what appeared to be plane wreckage near Bangladesh.

Calling it the "most promising lead" so far, the leader of the search for a missing Malaysia Airlines jetliner says ships have again detected a signal on the same frequency used by "black box" emergency beacons. But Angus Houston also reiterated that it's too early to draw conclusions.

This post was updated at 8:14 p.m. ET.

Malaysia's Prime Minister Najib Razak said Monday that new analysis of the flight path of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 showed that it "ended in the southern Indian Ocean."

This post is being updated.

Satellite images showing objects floating in the Indian Ocean have focused the search for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 and the 239 people who were on board to an area about 1,500 miles southwest of Perth, Australia.

Flickr Photo/Aero Icarus (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Wall Street Journal aerospace reporter Jon Ostrower about the Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777 and how its makeup can provide clues to finding the missing aircraft.

We're updating this post as new information comes in.

There's still no sign of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 or the 239 people on board.

The plane went missing March 8, less than an hour after taking off from Kuala Lumpur on what was supposed to be about a six-hour flight to Beijing.

Update at 10:20 a.m. ET: After Flight MH370 Disappeared, It Kept Telling Satellites 'I'm Awake':

Communications satellites continued to receive signals from the missing Malaysia Airlines plane for at least 5 1/2 hours after it disappeared over the Gulf of Thailand, a source familiar with the investigation tells NPR's Frank Langfitt.

Frank, reporting from Shanghai, writes that:

"Flight MH370's last known communication came after 1 o'clock last Saturday morning, local time, according to Malaysian officials.

This post has been updated.

There's no sign yet of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 — the Boeing 777 with 239 people aboard that disappeared early Saturday while on a flight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing.

At the same time, there is confusion as to where authorities last spotted the jet.

We'll be updating this post throughout the day on Monday.

Nearly three days after the disappearance of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370, there's still no definitive trace of the Boeing 777 or the 239 people who were on board.

As of Monday evening in Malaysia, none of the clues so far had led searchers to the plane.