Listening Tour | KUOW News and Information

Listening Tour

Amy Walgamott at her home in Shoreline, where homes have been rezoned so that developers may erect 70-foot apartment buildings.
Courtesy of Amy Walgamott

Sound Transit's light rail expansion project is changing neighborhoods.

People who use the train generally like to live near the station.


KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Everywhere, people are deserting the public space.

They’re not standing in line at the bank: They’re banking online. They’re not shopping for clothes at the mall: They’re getting clothes mailed to them at home. The internet is enabling people to meet their needs without going out.

The impacts of population growth are visible all around the Puget Sound area: thicker traffic, rising rents. It's also leading to more crowded classrooms, as some families with school kids know.

North of Seattle, Bothell schools in particular are experiencing growing pains. Schools and daycares are nearly filled to the brim.

Anna Ponder teaches a dance called stepping at the Steppers Unite Dance Studio - built in her garage. Ponder dances here with her student, Askia Heru.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Gentrification: It’s what happens when the people living in a low-income neighborhood get pushed out by new people with more money.

But some long-time residents manage to stay in gentrifying neighborhoods and thrive, like Anna Ponder, who teaches a dance style called stepping in Seattle's Columbia City neighborhood.

As Shoreline's planning commission met Thursday night, people in the Ridgecrest neighborhood hold the biggest event on their calendar: their annual ice cream social. Shoreline mayor Chris Roberts, in green, is serving ice cream.
KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Shoreline’s planning commission has approved the rezoning of a large area around the future 145th Street light rail station near the city’s border with Seattle.

It happened as its citizens learned that more residents would be displaced than previously thought.