life | KUOW News and Information

life

Nearly 2,000 people in New Zealand are gearing up to spread a little joy by giving a gift to a stranger.

When it comes to assessing the possible risks and benefits of science and technology, who is the relevant authority?

University scientists? Industry scientists? Religious organizations?

Kale Is About To Have An Identity Crisis

Nov 28, 2016

Kale is getting a makeover, and the very essence of kaliness may hang in the balance.

To develop a new variety of kale tailored to American palates, horticulture professor Philip Griffiths of Cornell University College of Agriculture and Life Science and graduate student Hannah Swegarden are soliciting consumers' kale reflections — the good, the bad, and the ugly. The scientists face a philosophic question for the ages. Asks Swegarden:

When you gaze long into an abyss, the abyss also gazes into you.

Flickr Photo/dcJohn (CC BY NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/7iCjJU

Bill Radke speaks with  Luke Burbank, host of the public radio show Live Wire, about how he plans to handle family, politics and stuffing this Thanksgiving. They also listen to calls from listeners about how they are tackling a fraught holiday.

The annual turkey pardon is a silly tradition, and President Obama knows it. On Wednesday, before pardoning turkeys named Tater and Tot, Obama summed up his feelings about this particular duty.

"It is my great privilege — well, it's my privilege — actually, let's just say it's my job to grant them clemency this afternoon," Obama said.

Gov. George Wallace, left, attempts to block integration at the University of Alabama on June 11, 1963.
By Warren K. Leffler, U.S. News & World Report Magazine [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Hundreds of hate crimes have been reported since the recent presidential election, including several incidents in the greater Seattle area.  Many people are scared and uncertain about where things are headed next.

But University of Washington professor Margaret O’Mara says studying history gives her reason to hope.


Kids are writing letters to president-elect Trump
Facebook Photo/Dear President Trump: Letters From Kids About Kindness

Any way you dice it, the election of Donald Trump has brought on a lot of feelings. 

Many adults have expressed those feelings online, on social media and through taking to the streets. But what about our kids?

On election night, did you already have a bad feeling about your family Thanksgiving? One Northwest brother and sister did. Jessica Brady and Jeremy Holmes both voted for Hillary Clinton. Their parents didn’t.

Dana and Dave Verellen fled Seattle for Tacoma.
KUOW Photo/Jeannie Yandel

Bill Radke talks to Dave and Dana Verellen, owners of Zodiac Supper Club in Tacoma, about why they decided to move from Seattle. 

Every holiday season, things get a "bit tricky," says Risa Greene, 53, from New York City. "You have one child who is a human garbage disposal and will eat anything you put in front of him, and you have another child who is more restricted than [the] TSA."

Greene's son is an omnivore — he eats everything. Her daughter, Jessica, is a vegan. She stopped eating meat when she was in high school years ago, then dropped dairy products and eggs in college and eventually gave up gluten, too.

'Week in Review' panel Sydney Brownstone, Bill Radke, Chris Vance and Sherman Alexie.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

We're back with the first Week In Review since the election and let's be honest: We're not going to talk about much else this hour. 

What will you do now that Donald J. Trump is president-elect? What will a Trump presidency mean for liberal cities like Seattle? And are you brave or foolish enough to talk politics this Thanksgiving?

Lars Ulrich is the son of a Danish tennis pro — and he might have actually had a promising career in that sport himself. But at age 9, he saw something that would change his direction forever. He was at a tennis tournament in Copenhagen with his dad, and the hard rock band Deep Purple had invited all of the players at the tournament to their show.

Many, many Thanksgivings ago, my fiance took me home to Allentown, Pa., to be inspected by his family. During our visit, my mother-in-law-to-be served a relish so delicious that I married her son.

Ever since, I've shared the recipe with NPR listeners right before Thanksgiving. Now, supportive listeners may be shocked to learn that over the years, I've gotten a good deal of grief about this recipe — especially from my NPR colleagues, many of whom have never bothered to taste it!

Courtesy of the Seattle Post-Intelligencer Collection, MOHAI

Seattle's food scene is booming.

Not only is it doing well economically, but people come from all over the world to try our oysters and berries and stroll Pike Place Market.


Meals cooked at home keep getting cheaper, and Thanksgiving dinner will be a real bargain this year.

That's what two separate measures of food prices showed on Thursday.

One gauge, the Consumer Price Index done in October by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, showed that the cost of food at the supermarket — known as "food-at-home" prices — fell for the sixth straight month. Such prices are now down 2.3 percent from the same time last year.

President Obama has announced the last group of people to whom he will award the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor.

The group of 21 luminaries includes athletes Michael Jordan and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, musicians Diana Ross and Bruce Springsteen and actors Robert De Niro, Tom Hanks, Robert Redford and Cicely Tyson.

The group also honors inspiring people who may not be household names, such as Native American community leader and advocate Elouise Cobell and computer code pioneer Grace Hopper, both of whom are deceased.

Thanks to improved health care, the Native American populations around the country are growing. But the number of homes hasn't kept up. That's especially true of the Northern Arapaho on Wyoming's Wind River Indian Reservation.

Northern Arapaho elder Kenneth Shakespeare raised seven children in a house with views of mountains and hayfields surrounding it. But now he has dementia and it's his kids turn to take care of him in the same four-bedroom, two-bath house they grew up in.

Fans at a Seattle Seahawks match.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

It's been almost two years since the Seattle Seahawks lost the Super Bowl to the New England Patriots. This Sunday, the two teams meet for the first time since then in a game that's being called a Super Bowl rematch. 

Sports writer Dave Zirin said for some fans in Seattle, which voted overwhelmingly against Donald Trump, it will also be political grudge match.  


Bill Radke speaks with Harborview psychiatrist Doug Zatzick about what ordinary Americans can do to get through the final hours of the election; including whether or not it is OK to spend the rest of election day in a kiddie pool full of Jell-O shots.

There may be nothing more American than mom and apple pie – but mom and cake come pretty close.

Ask Anne Byrn, the Nashville-based best-selling author and baker whose romance with cake started when she was tall enough to reach for the box of Hershey's cocoa.

People take part in a 'Black Lives Matter' demonstration.
Flickr Photo/Joe Brusky (CC BY NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/pscnno

You may have heard the term “white fragility.” Dr. Robin DiAngelo coined the expression to describe the defensive positions white people often take when confronted with the facts of racism.

This talk details the realities of our racist society today and points towards possible remedies.

As the cat-tentious — or rather, contentious — political season winds down, there's something afoot that may help voters relax: cat yoga. Animal shelters in Illinois, Louisiana, Michigan, New York, Texas and other states across the country are partnering with yoga studios to raise money and increase adoptions.

In the small town of Sunderland, Mass., is a 300-year-old, family-run plot of land that fuses fine art and farming.

Mike Wissemann's 8-acre cornfield maze is a feat of ingenuity, with carefully planned and executed stalk-formed replicas of notables such as the Mona Lisa, Albert Einstein and Salvador Dalí.

The New York Giants have released kicker Josh Brown over his admitted abuse of his then-wife, in a case that has previously raised questions about the NFL's willingness to punish players who commit acts of domestic violence.

"We believed we did the right thing at every juncture in our relationship with Josh," team President John Mara said in a statement. "Our beliefs, our judgments and our decisions were misguided. We accept that responsibility."

With the presidential election days away — and media attention at full force — let's take a moment to consider some random facts that are not about the election:

1. Seahorses are nearly unique in the animal kingdom in that males carry the fertilized eggs after breeding and eventually "give birth." The number of offspring can reach thousands.

New research finds little lies pave the way for big ones.

Courtesy of Alex Czopp

Earlier this month, a tape of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump bragging about groping women sent his campaign into turmoil.

But it's not just Trump on that recording. You can also hear Trump being encouraged by former Today Show host Billy Bush.


Bicycles are a type of vehicle so they belong on the road, right?

This is how the wheels turn in places such as New York City and San Francisco, where bicyclists older than age 13 are banned from riding on the sidewalk. Similar laws exist in many cities and towns throughout the country, such as Columbus, Ohio, and Chapel Hill, N.C.

That's not the case everywhere, though. In Boston and Washington, D.C., sidewalk cycling is allowed — with the exception of the downtown areas. But just because bicyclists are allowed to ride on the sidewalk doesn't mean they are welcome there.

(Clockwise from top left) Claire Miccio and baby John, Kris 'Sonics Guy' Brannon, Maliah Washington, Jessica Salvador, Lance Forshay and Andrew Scudder, and Paul Constantine.
KUOW Photos/John O'Brien

A question arose this election season, as it does periodically: How well do U.S. citizens and candidates for public office understand and value the contents of the Constitution of the United States?

Pages