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We meet Eleanor Flood, the main character of Maria Semple's new novel, on a day when she has resolved to change some things about her life:

She wants to take pictures of happiness.

That's one of the goals that Fati Abubakar set when she started her Instagram feed bitsofborno last year.

Borno is a state in the troubled northeast of Nigeria, where the extremist group Boko Haram began operating. The capital city, Maiduguri, birthplace of the insurgency, is where this 30-year-old nurse lives and works as a project manager for a malnutrition project as well as a documentary photographer.

Ten years ago, a gunman barricaded himself inside a one-room Amish schoolhouse near Lancaster, Pa. Then he opened fire.

Charles "Charlie" Roberts killed five children and injured five others before killing himself.

The Amish community responded in a way that many found surprising: They forgave the shooter. And, in the years since, they have grown close to his family.

"I will never face my Amish neighbors again"

The Supreme Court has decided to hear a case that might decide whether the government can deny Washington's NFL team a trademark because it has deemed the team name is offensive.

The court granted certiorari on Lee V. Tam. If you remember, The Slants, an Asian-American rock band, sued the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office because it refused to trademark their name saying it proved offensive.

Bill Radke speaks with local independent podcast producer Marlo Mack about how she came to accept that the child she thought was her son was actually her daughter. Mack, who goes by a pseudonym to protect her child, has joined with KUOW to collaborate on a new season of How To Be A Girl, a podcast about raising a transgender daughter. 

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Check out this bhangra by the beach, Nova Scotia style

Sep 28, 2016
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Facebook Screenshot

Bhangra is a style of both music and dance that's popular in the Punjab region of India.

But a new bhangra video that went viral has a distinctly different backdrop: Peggy's Cove, in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia. 

Alaina Caldwell, Gerald Elliott, Jodi White, Alissa Wehrman, Eula Scott Bynoe, Matthew Brasco and Jasmine Jackson.
KUOW Photo/Brie Ripley

It’s all over the news and social media: A person of color is shot and killed by police, there’s a protest, and an investigation, then another shooting. What does this seemingly endless cycle say about racism in America? 

This summer, Speakers Forum recorded an event called “Black Lives in America: Healing and Moving Forward.” It was hosted by the crew at HellaBlackHellaSeattle, a podcast focused on creating community for people of color in Seattle. 

We've all been there — having fun relaxing with friends and family, when someone says something a little racially off. Sometimes it's subtle, like the friend who calls Thai food "exotic." Other times it's more overt, like that in-law who's always going on about "the illegals."

In any case, it can be hard to know how to respond. Even the most level-headed among us have faltered trying to navigate the fraught world of racial awkwardness.

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Lucas Jackson/Reuters

For the millions of Spanish-speaking Americans who caught the presidential debate on Univision Monday night, there was a familiar voice: Vicente de la Vega.

De la Vega was the simultaneous interpreter for Donald Trump during the debate broadcast — a role he's played at various times during the campaign. He's also the president and CEO of Precision Translating Services.

For decades, artifacts of life and work from the Manhattan Project and Cold War era at Hanford have been locked away. Now, these historical items are being trucked off the southeast Washington nuclear site and curated at Washington State University Tri-Cities.

Courtesy of Michelle Kaufman

Bill Radke speaks with writer and humorist Dave Barry about what it's like to live in a state that's relevant during presidential elections. While Hillary Clinton will almost certainly get Washington's electoral votes, Florida, per usual, is up for grabs. 

Barry, whose new book is "Best. State. Ever.: A Florida Man Defends His Homeland," tells Radke about the origins of Florida's wacky reputation (the 2000 election), what he thinks of Seattle and what we can all learn this election season from Florida's legendary electoral foibles. 

Emily Fox talks with journalist Maureen O'Hagan about the mystery surrounding the true identity of a deceased Texas woman who went by the name Lori Ruff. She stole the identity of a Washington girl who died in a house fire in the 1970s. Last week, it was revealed that Ruff was born Kimberly McLean, who ran away from her Pennsylvania home when she was 18.

KUOW photo/Bond Huberman

After last week’s announcement by Seattle Mayor Ed Murray to put the plans for the new North Precinct building on hold, protesters interrupted a City Council meeting. What new issues are they raising with the city?

Courtesy of Seattle University/Yosef Chaim Kalinko

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar is known for his record-setting feats in the NBA and as a best-selling author and cultural critic. His new book is “Writings on the Wall: Searching for a New Equality beyond Black and White.”

He spoke with journalist Art Thiel on September 8 at Seattle University. Jennie Cecil Moore recorded their talk.

KUOW Photo/Caroline Chamberlain

Bill Radke sits down with Sean Liming, a Capitol Hill resident who is attending the neighborhood's first ever renters summit. At the summit, he'll be calling for renters in Capitol Hill, who make up 80 percent of the neighborhood's residents, to unite to create policy ideas to combat skyrocketing rents. 

Week 2 of the NFL season is now complete, and what once would have been unimaginable is now becoming commonplace.

I'm talking about protests — player protests — visible, controversial, much-talked-about displays during the playing of the national anthem, before NFL games, in stadiums, around the country.

These protests began nearly a month ago when San Francisco 49ers backup quarterback Colin Kaepernick chose to sit rather than stand while The Star-Spangled Banner was being played during a preseason game.

3,000-Year-Old Cooking Fail Found At A Danish Dig Site

Sep 21, 2016

Denmark currently holds the title of world's happiest country. But we could imagine at least one Norseman back in time who, after a failed cooking attempt, probably felt little of the famed Danish hygge.

In a hilly wetland north of Silkeborg, archaeologists have unearthed a wholly intact Bronze Age clay pot containing a cheesy and charred residue burned to its inside.

Isha Devi hails from Agra, home of the Taj Mahal, built by a grieving king for a beloved queen. Isha now lives three hours and a world away from any such romantic ideals.

Renting a small dingy room, this mother of a 12- and 14-year-old has come to the outskirts of New Delhi to live close to her fertility clinic. Isha, 30, is six months pregnant with someone else's twins. Her room opens onto a noisy alleyway of families in similarly cramped quarters all sharing a single bathroom. Isha groans, shifts uncomfortably on her cot and rearranges her pink floral sari.

Bill Radke talks to Washington State University professor Deborah A. Christel about a recent study she co-authored on plus-sized women and athletic clothing. In the study, she found that a majority of plus-sized women, or women who wear the size 16 and over, had to shop in the mens' clothing section to find athletic clothing that fit them. 

Flickr Photo/Lynn Friedman (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/d1c4F3

Bill Radke speaks with Benjamin K. Bergen about his new book, "What the F." In the book, Bergen explains why we find profanity so shocking, but also so appealing at the same time. Bergen is a professor of cognitive science at University of California San Diego. 

Amy Pittman received a box with sample formula from a company that got her information from a pregnancy app. Pittman had already miscarried when the box arrived.
Courtesy of Amy Pittman

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Amy Pittman about her miscarriage and how the internet missed one of the biggest moments in her life. Pittman wrote an essay for the New York Times' Modern Love column about her experience. She tells Yandel what reaction she's received and how she thinks differently about big data. 

Don Buchla believed in the humanity of wires. The modular synth pioneer created an instrument like none other, one that relied on intuition, learning and, most importantly, human touch. He died September 14 after a long battle with cancer at the age of 79.

It was the night of the small-screen giants. And none stood taller at the 2016 Emmys than the HBO juggernauts Game of Thrones and Veep, which won for best drama and comedy series, respectively. The People v. O.J. Simpson also won the Emmy for outstanding limited series.

Game of Thrones and VEEP may have pulled off repeat wins at Sunday's Emmy Awards, but there was also plenty of room for fresh faces in the winner's circle.

More people from across the globe than ever are seeking to transform themselves on the Pacific Crest Trail from Mexico to Canada. And as fall comes, the through-hiker season is wrapping up.

From left, Zaki Hamid, Eli Sanders, Ijeoma Oluo and Bill Radke.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray has announced that the plans for the new North Precinct building will be put on hold. He says the city needs to consider the cost of the building and impact it will have on communities of color. What should happen as the city re-draws the plan?                

Pokemon Go trainers will do almost anything for a rare find, including getting into a car and speeding around to catch them. And then they tweet about it. According to a study, there were over 113,000 social media messages in 10 days last July that showed people getting into potentially unsafe traffic situations while trying to catch cute virtual monsters.

Every year, libraries around the country observe Banned Books Week, to remind the public that even well known and much loved books can be the targets of censorship. This year, Washington, D.C.'s public library came up with a clever idea to focus attention on the issue: a banned books scavenger hunt.

Courtesy of Julia Harrison

Bill Radke speaks with food anthropologist Julia Harrison about how Washington state became the king of apple production in America. 

An example of recent treasures hidden on Mercer Island.
Facebook Photo/Mercer Island Rocks!

Bill Radke talks with Richard Ronald about the game his family started playing on Mercer Island beaches: collecting and painting rocks and then hiding them for others to find

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