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life

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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They're odds. That's all they are. Not fate, just probabilities. Lauren Weinstein, cartoonist, is having a baby, and she's told — out of the blue — that she and her husband are both carriers of the gene that causes cystic fibrosis. They are sent to a genetic counselor. What happens next — told in five beautifully drawn, emotionally eloquent cartoons — tells what it's like to walk the edge for a few weeks. She's so many things (sad, funny, scared, puzzled), and then there's the ender. Take a look.

For one week back in 2012, Facebook scientists altered what appeared on the News Feed of more than 600,000 users. One group got mostly positive items; the other got mostly negative items.

Scientists then monitored the posts of those people and found that they were more negative if they received the negative News Feed and more positive if they received positive items.

Marcie Sillman talks with the Technology Access Foundation's David Harris about his idea to get more kids and teens of color interested in tech careers: the Central District Hackathon.

Courtesy Ed Murray

Last week, ahead of Pride Weekend, I sat down for a morning chat with Mayor Ed Murray and his husband to discuss their dear friend Cal Anderson.

Flickr Photot/Sounder Bruce (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Seattle City Light hired an online reputation management firm and now the utility would like its money, and its repuation, back. The State Liquor Control board filed emergency marijuana rules. And why does Seattle love soccer, a sport where losing can end happily?

KUOW's Bill Radke kicks those stories and more around with Joni Balter, Knute Berger and Eli Sanders.

KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Four people live in a cozy home on Capitol Hill, which they call WOW, for Wild Old Women.

Or that’s what they used to call it; now they call it Wild Old Women And One Young Man, since a godson of one member joined a year ago.

KUOW Photo/Ross Reynolds

While visiting Germany for a journalism fellowship, KUOW’s Ross Reynolds reports on what's changed and what's stayed the same in the 25 years since the fall of the Berlin Wall.

Imagine being able to walk into a public library and check out a Wi-Fi hot spot as if it were just another book. Soon, patrons in two major U.S. cities won't have to imagine it.

The public library systems in New York and Chicago won funding from the Knight Foundation to experiment with the idea of hot-spot lending. Both say they hope the move will help them expand Internet access among low-income families.

Outliving Our Pets: A Tribute To Pilar

Jun 27, 2014

Poppy, the world's oldest known cat, died earlier this month in England at the age of 24.

Near San Francisco, a homeless woman named Roza Katovitch and a cat named Miss Tuxedo met in a cemetery and bonded with each other, changing both of their lives for the better.

New federal population figures out Thursday show the nation’s youngest county is in the Northwest. And it’s not in an urban area. Madison County, Idaho, is in the midst of eastern Idaho's potato country.

Giorgio Chiellini, the Italian defender whose shoulder bore teeth marks after a clash with Uruguay's Luis Suarez during a World Cup match Tuesday, says FIFA's four-month ban of Suarez is too harsh. Chiellini released a statement on his website saying his thoughts are with the star striker and his family.

Flickr Photo/harry_nl (CC-BY-NC-ND)

While visiting Germany for a journalism fellowship, KUOW’s Ross Reynolds shares some firsthand observations of the World Cup fever he’s witnessed during his stay in Berlin, where every game — whether Germany is playing or not — is big.

Reynolds said public viewing areas are all over the city, from the giant public viewing space near the Brandenburg Gate created for some 50,000 people, to the small, neighborhood convenience stores that set out chairs and TVs for customers. Wherever you are watching, he said, the beer and Curryvurst probably isn’t too far away.

“Fun fact about the World Cup here,” Reynolds told fellow Record host Marcie Sillman in a phone interview. “It’s being broadcast by the public television network! Imagine if PBS had the franchise on running the World Series; that’s what it’s like here in Germany.”

The Secret Messages In Gay Men's Pockets

Jun 26, 2014

Marcie Sillman talks with Jeff Henness, owner of Doghouse Leathers on Capitol Hill, about the history of the "hanky code," a system devised by gay men to communicate sexual preferences.

Marcie Sillman talks with Jason Berry, author of "Lead Us Not Into Temptation" and contributor to the National Catholic Reporter, about the long history of sex abuse in the Catholic church and one organization that is crumbling in the wake of sex abuse settlements.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

KUOW Photo/Patricia Murphy

Twenty-three years ago, acting Captain Steve Strand was patrolling Columbia City on a mountain bike, busting alleyway crack dealers. The officers under his charge are still patrolling on mountain bikes, but the neighborhood landscape has changed.

Among the great promises of the Internet were free expression and community — that you or I can make things and share them with ease, and that we can more easily connect with weirdos just like us.

Marcie Sillman interviews Anna Steffeney, founder and CEO of LeaveLogic, about President Obama's working families summit and the current state of family leave policies at the federal, state and local levels.

Flickr Photo/Nathan Forget (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Clint Dempsey and the U.S. Men's National Soccer Team need only a tie against Germany to advance to the second round of the 2014 FIFA World Cup. Bill Radke asks BBC soccer analyst Steve Crossman what we need to know to enjoy the match.

AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell

A flood of immigrant children arriving at the border with Mexico could end up in Washington state at Joint Base Lewis-McChord near Tacoma.

We eat first with our eyes. When strawberries are perfectly red, they seem to taste sweeter. When chicken is painted blue, it's disturbing. The ancient Romans understood that, and certainly today's top chefs exploit it when they plate their food.

A 56-year-old man is having lunch with his wife at a seafood restaurant just outside Boston when he develops crushing chest pain. He refuses an ambulance, so the man's wife drives him to the ER.

What happens next says a lot about the difference that being a doctor or a patient can make in how one feels about the health care system.

First, how did the patient and his wife see the trip to the hospital?

How Washington Is Working To Increase Latino Fishers

Jun 25, 2014

WENTACHEE, Wash. -- About 150 people line the shoreline at the Beehive Reservoir in north central Washington. Spanish and English mix, as anglers plunk lures into the lake. And just as quickly as the lures sink to the bottom, rainbow trout bite down on the chartreuse-colored bait.

"You've got a bite," someone on the shoreline shouts.

The small reservoir is about a 20 minute drive from downtown Wenatchee. But Norma Gallegos said it’s a trip made by only a few of the city’s Hispanic residents.

Underneath the charm of Martha's Vineyard's picturesque beaches, peaceful woods and luxury homes is a problem: Since August, there have been six overdose deaths on the island.

"That's a phenomenal rate for a community of 16,000 people — and that's not to mention the overdoses that haven't been fatal," says Charles Silberstein, an addiction specialist and psychiatrist at Martha's Vineyard Hospital. "We've had overdoses for years, but I don't think we've ever seen this kind of number or frequency."

A Methodist minister in Pennsylvania, who was defrocked last year for presiding over his son's same-sex wedding, has been reinstated by the church.

A nine-person appeals panel of the United Methodist Church ordered Frank Schaefer's pastoral credentials restored, saying "the jury that convicted him last year erred when fashioning his punishment," according to The Associated Press.

What To Binge Watch This Summer

Jun 24, 2014
Flickr Photo/C.P.Storm (Cc-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman gets summer television recommendations from IMDB TV editor, Melanie McFarland.

Finding an address on a map can be taken for granted in the age of GPS and smartphones. But centuries of forced relocation, disease and genocide have made it difficult to find where many Native American tribes once lived.

Aaron Carapella, a self-taught mapmaker in Warner, Okla., has pinpointed the locations and original names of hundreds of American Indian nations before their first contact with Europeans.

Marcie Sillman speaks with Medina Mayor Michael Luis, author of "Century 21 City: Seattle's Fifty Year Journey from World's Fair to World Stage," who says that Seattle -- WTO riots and the $15 minimum wage notwithstanding -- has a pattern of indulging radicals and then returning to business as usual.

KUOW Photo/Daniel Berman

When John Reese moved from northern Illinois to Seattle last year he kept hearing people talking about the Seattle Freeze. So far he hasn’t seen any sign of it. In fact, he says people are nicer here than they are back home.

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