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life

KUOW Photo/Sonya Harris

When an acclaimed novelist publishes their first new work in 20 years, people take notice.

When the first book was Arundhati Roy’s “The God of Small Things,” the interest is especially intense. She was awarded the esteemed Booker Prize for the best novel in the English language in 1997.

Roy’s new work is “The Ministry of Utmost Happiness.” The novel concerns, as she suggests in the text itself, “the vast, violent, circling, driving, ridiculous, insane, unfeasible, public turmoil of a nation.”

KUOW Illustration/Kara McDermott

Some of us will do almost anything to avoid boredom. No, really — anything.

A University of Virginia study put a bunch of people in a room that was empty except for an electric shock machine. What they found was rather, well, shocking.

Is it time for a change to King's Court?

Jul 11, 2017
King's Court at Safeco Field
Flickr Photo/Nekonomist (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/emf7pu

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Times sports columnist Larry Stone about why he thinks Mariners fans should change the King's Court, a special cheering section at Safeco Field for pitcher Felix Hernandez.  

Display at the Valentinetti Puppet Museum in downtown Bremerton, Washington.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Starting Monday it will only take half an hour to reach Bremerton if you take Kitsap Transit’s fast ferry. It runs from the King County dock just south of Colman dock – the one used by the water taxis – to a dock close to WSDOT’s car ferry terminal in Bremerton.

Until today, a car trip from downtown Seattle to Snohomish County took less time than a ferry trip to Bremerton. Now, the opposite is true. 

When Kelly Barrales-Saylor was a new mom, she got a lot of children's books as gifts. Most were simple books about shapes, colors and letters. There were none about science — or math.

"My editorial brain lit up and said there must be a need for this," says Barrales-Saylor, who works as an editor for a publishing company outside Chicago.

Halfway across the world, Chris Ferrie was similarly unsatisfied.

When reading to his kids, Ferrie noticed that most books used animals to introduce new words. In today's world, that just didn't make sense to him.

Ballard Locks under construction, 1913
FLICKR PHOTO/SEATTLE MUNICIPAL ARCHIVES (CC BY 2.0)/HTTPS://FLIC.KR/P/4TIHT9

This story originally aired in 2005. We loved it so much that we dug it out again in honor of the Ballard Locks' 100 year anniversary on July 4, 2017.

Fake news has been on Maggie Farley's mind further back than 2016 when President Trump brought the term into the vernacular.

Farley, a veteran journalist, says we've had fake news forever and that "people have always been trying to manipulate information for their own ends," but she calls what we're seeing now "Fake news with a capital F." In other words, extreme in its ambition for financial gain or political power.

"Before, the biggest concern was, 'Are people being confused by opinion; are people being tricked by spin?' " Now, Farley says, the stakes are much higher.

music concert
FLICKR PHOTO/Avarty Photos (CC BY-SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/ffNvCc

You're living in a region with tons of good, new, local music. Too much to take it all in, so Bill Radke speaks with Jonathan Zwickel, who writes a City Arts Magazine column called Attractive Singles. Zwickel has picked out three local artists for you to get to know.

What local chefs think about food appropriation

Jun 27, 2017
Chefs Edouardo Jordan and Rachel Yang
KUOW Photo/Shane Mehling

Bill Radke speaks with Edouardo Jordan and Rachel Yang, chefs and Seattle restaurant owners. In light of two Portland women shutting down a burrito cart after being accused of food appropriation, Jordan and Yang discuss how they view culture and the sanctity of food. They also explain how they have been inspired by other cultures to create their signature dishes. 

The first book of the Harry Potter series went on sale in the U.K. 20 years ago today. It offers a convenient excuse to reacquaint yourself with a world before anyone on this side of the Atlantic had heard of muggles, horcruxes or pensieves, before tourists would crowd into London's Kings Cross railway station simply to peer wistfully at the space between Platforms Nine and Ten.

Here's the first story NPR ever aired about Harry Potter — a wonderful piece by the late Margot Adler, from All Things Considered in 1998.

Some gems, from that bygone era:

An Orcas Island, Washington, man has become the first person to complete the Race to Alaska on a standup paddleboard. Karl Kruger stroked 750 miles solo from Port Townsend up the Inside Passage, crossing the finish line in Ketchikan Sunday evening. 

Today we're going to update a story we first brought you back in 2004. That September, NPR set out to document what may be the most important day in any young child's life — the first day of kindergarten. For parents it's a day filled with hope, anxiety and one big question: Is our child ready?

The answer back then, as far as 5-year-old Sam Marsenison was concerned, was, "No, no, no!"

Streets signs on Broadway in Capitol Hill, where Seattle's PrideFest is taking on a neighborhood event Saturday.
KUOW Photo/Angela Nhi Nguyen

A Seattle Pride event that showcases Capitol Hill businesses will go on as planned Saturday, but with different organizers.

The so-called Bite of Pride was in question after the city refused to issue permits for the original backers.

baby kid
Flickr Photo/Tamaki Sono (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/224maX

Bill Radke speaks with artist, poet and mother of two, Natasha Marin, about the realization that she didn't have to become a mother. She says motherhood seemed like something she was always just supposed to do.

Radke also speaks with poet and curator Imani Sims about her decision to not have any kids.

Marin's story and this conversation on motherhood first appeared in an article by the Seattle Times.

Two years ago, Eqbal Dauqan was going to work in the morning as usual. She's a biochemistry professor. And was driving on the freeway, when suddenly: "I felt something hit my car, but I didn't know what it was because I was driving very fast," she says.

Dauqan reached the parking lot. Got out of the car and looked at the door. What she saw left her speechless.

"A bullet hit the car, just on the door," she says.

The door had stopped the bullet. And Dauqan was OK. She has no idea where the bullet came from. But it turned out to be an ominous sign of what was to come.

A naming rights agreement with Safeco Insurance and the Seattle Mariner's baseball field ends after the 2018 season.
Flickr Photo/Ashley Murphy (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/aeMMq5

Safeco Field, the home of the Seattle Mariners, will be getting a new name. Safeco Insurance and the ball club said they’re ending their agreement.

It doesn’t sound like people in Seattle are too concerned about the name change.

Author and filmmaker Sherman Alexie waits with dancers backstage for his turn on stage as the keynote speaker at a celebration of Indigenous Peoples’ Day Monday, Oct. 10, 2016, at Seattle's City Hall.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

In Sherman Alexie’s deeply personal memoir, “You Don't Have to Say You Love Me,” he tells the story of growing up as the son of Lillian Alexie on the Spokane Indian Reservation.

'Week in Review' panel C.R. Douglas, Joni Balter, Jonathan Martin and Essex Porter.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray says any future NBA team should play at Seattle Center and picks a development team that includes Hollywood producer Jerry Bruckheimer to renovate KeyArena.

Former FBI director James Comey tells a Senate investigative panel that he was fired because of the investigation he was leading into ties between Russia and President Trump's campaign.

Capitol Hill Pride Festival participants are demonstrating in two marches. One of them is described as, "the Pride version of the Women's March."
Courtesy of Capitol Hill Pride Festival March & Rally

The three-day Capitol Hill Pride Festival kicks off this weekend. However, organizers expressed frustration in not receiving all the city permits they requested for the event.

If you were worried you had cancer, who would you call for information? Chances are a federally-funded cancer helpline isn't the first place that pops into your mind.

But for 40 years, a helpline funded primarily by the National Cancer Institute has been answering people's questions about cancer.

Key Arena is home court for Sue Bird, a 9 time WNBA All-Star
Seattle Storm

Bill Radke speaks with Wally Walker, former general manager of the Seattle Sonics, about his support for a plan to build a NBA and NHL arena in Sodo.

However, Seattle Mayor Ed Murray chose an investor group to renovate KeyArena. He said he wants hockey and basketball in Seattle Center, not Sodo. 

Has the city now abandoned the Sodo idea? Walker says no.

KeyArena is the current home of the WBNA's Seattle Storm, and former home of the NBA's Seattle SuperSonics
Seattle Storm

It's the beginning of the end for Key Arena as we know it.

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray announced Wednesday the city is accepting a bid from Oak View Group to renovate the facility. Flanked by high-status members of the music, film and sports industries, Murray signed a contract with the OVG for them to renovate the arena.

Seven Gabels Theatre in Seattle's University District
Flickr Photo/ javacolleen (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)/ https://flic.kr/p/31fDJf

Bill Radke talks to KUOW arts reporter Marcie Sillman and Sean Nelson, arts and music editor at The Stranger, about the closing of two Landmark movie theaters in Seattle, Guild 45th and Seven Gables Theatre.  

It was time for Emily Harrington to make a choice.

Harrington is a professional climber. In 2014, she was trying to reach the top of the tallest peak in Southeast Asia, a little-known mountain called Hkakabo Razi that had been successfully climbed only once before.

We all know that cellphones and driving can be a dangerous mix, and yet a quick glance at the sound of a ping can be irresistible to many motorists.

So beyond turning off your cellphone or leaving it at home, Apple has a new solution aimed at keeping drivers' eyes off the screen and on the road. When Apple's iOS 11 update comes out this fall, it will include a "Do Not Disturb While Driving" mode.

When Anthony Planakis was going through the New York Police Academy, they told him to write his interests down on a little card.

"Beekeeping, of course I put that down," says 54-year-old Planakis, who is a fourth generation beekeeper. "And the very first job, the sergeant comes right up to me and I just look up and go, 'Hey, Sarge,' and he goes, 'Bees?' and I go, 'Yeah, where?' 'Harlem.' And I go, 'Cool.' That was it, that was the first job I handled," he says.

Cassie Chinn is the Deputy Executive Director of the Wing Luke Museum and Tam Nguyen is the owner of Tamarind Tree in Chinatown-International District
KUOW Photo/ Amina Al-Sadi

Bill Radke talks to Cassie Chinn, deputy executive director of the Wing Luke Museum, and Tam Nguyen, the owner of Tamarind Tree, about how Chinatown-International District is changing and what might be lost as the area faces the pressure of new development.  

Flickr Photo/Steven Santiago (CC-BY-NC-ND)/https://flic.kr/p/q4dpg6

Bill Radke and Monica Guzman, co-founder of the Seattle newsletter The Evergrey, take calls from listeners about moving to Seattle, expectations vs. reality and the question of when do you become a local.  

Writer Kate Lebo
Heather Malcom

Bill Radke speaks with Kate Lebo about why she left her life in Seattle to move to Spokane. We all know new people are flooding into this area, but as all these people move in, who are the people moving out? 

You probably have seen standup paddleboarders along your local shoreline. But can you imagine paddling one of those boards for 750 miles up the Inside Passage to Alaska?

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