life | KUOW News and Information

life

'Week in Review' panel C.R. Douglas, Joni Balter, Jonathan Martin and Essex Porter.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray says any future NBA team should play at Seattle Center and picks a development team that includes Hollywood producer Jerry Bruckheimer to renovate KeyArena.

Former FBI director James Comey tells a Senate investigative panel that he was fired because of the investigation he was leading into ties between Russia and President Trump's campaign.

Capitol Hill Pride Festival participants are demonstrating in two marches. One of them is described as, "the Pride version of the Women's March."
Courtesy of Capitol Hill Pride Festival March & Rally

The three-day Capitol Hill Pride Festival kicks off this weekend. However, organizers expressed frustration in not receiving all the city permits they requested for the event.

If you were worried you had cancer, who would you call for information? Chances are a federally-funded cancer helpline isn't the first place that pops into your mind.

But for 40 years, a helpline funded primarily by the National Cancer Institute has been answering people's questions about cancer.

Key Arena is home court for Sue Bird, a 9 time WNBA All-Star
Seattle Storm

Bill Radke speaks with Wally Walker, former general manager of the Seattle Sonics, about his support for a plan to build a NBA and NHL arena in Sodo.

However, Seattle Mayor Ed Murray chose an investor group to renovate KeyArena. He said he wants hockey and basketball in Seattle Center, not Sodo. 

Has the city now abandoned the Sodo idea? Walker says no.

Seattle's Key Arena is the former home of the NBA's Seattle Sonics, and current home of the WBNA Storm
Seattle Storm

It's the beginning of the end for Key Arena as we know it.

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray announced Wednesday the city is accepting a bid from Oak View Group to renovate the facility. Flanked by high-status members of the music, film and sports industries, Murray signed a contract with the OVG for them to renovate the arena.

Seven Gabels Theatre in Seattle's University District
Flickr Photo/ javacolleen (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)/ https://flic.kr/p/31fDJf

Bill Radke talks to KUOW arts reporter Marcie Sillman and Sean Nelson, arts and music editor at The Stranger, about the closing of two Landmark movie theaters in Seattle, Guild 45th and Seven Gables Theatre.  

It was time for Emily Harrington to make a choice.

Harrington is a professional climber. In 2014, she was trying to reach the top of the tallest peak in Southeast Asia, a little-known mountain called Hkakabo Razi that had been successfully climbed only once before.

We all know that cellphones and driving can be a dangerous mix, and yet a quick glance at the sound of a ping can be irresistible to many motorists.

So beyond turning off your cellphone or leaving it at home, Apple has a new solution aimed at keeping drivers' eyes off the screen and on the road. When Apple's iOS 11 update comes out this fall, it will include a "Do Not Disturb While Driving" mode.

When Anthony Planakis was going through the New York Police Academy, they told him to write his interests down on a little card.

"Beekeeping, of course I put that down," says 54-year-old Planakis, who is a fourth generation beekeeper. "And the very first job, the sergeant comes right up to me and I just look up and go, 'Hey, Sarge,' and he goes, 'Bees?' and I go, 'Yeah, where?' 'Harlem.' And I go, 'Cool.' That was it, that was the first job I handled," he says.

Cassie Chinn is the Deputy Executive Director of the Wing Luke Museum and Tam Nguyen is the owner of Tamarind Tree in Chinatown-International District
KUOW Photo/ Amina Al-Sadi

Bill Radke talks to Cassie Chinn, deputy executive director of the Wing Luke Museum, and Tam Nguyen, the owner of Tamarind Tree, about how Chinatown-International District is changing and what might be lost as the area faces the pressure of new development.  

Flickr Photo/Steven Santiago (CC-BY-NC-ND)/https://flic.kr/p/q4dpg6

Bill Radke and Monica Guzman, co-founder of the Seattle newsletter The Evergrey, take calls from listeners about moving to Seattle, expectations vs. reality and the question of when do you become a local.  

Writer Kate Lebo
Heather Malcom

Bill Radke speaks with Kate Lebo about why she left her life in Seattle to move to Spokane. We all know new people are flooding into this area, but as all these people move in, who are the people moving out? 

You probably have seen standup paddleboarders along your local shoreline. But can you imagine paddling one of those boards for 750 miles up the Inside Passage to Alaska?

Melissa Tizon is the widow of Alex Tizon.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

On the day that journalist Alex Tizon died, editors at The Atlantic decided to put his story, “My Family’s Slave” on the cover of the magazine. The story went viral, receiving praise and criticism.

Browse through some turn-of-the-century American cookbooks, and it's obvious that popular tastes have changed (such as the presence of fried cornmeal mush and the absence of cilantro). But more striking than the shift in flavors and ingredients is the focus on feeding those who are sick — or, to use the parlance of the time, "cooking for invalids."

tained glass from Blessed Sacrament church in Seattle.
Flickr Photo/Fr Lawrence Lew, O.P. (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/RD1oUp

Bill Radke speaks with Rod Dreher about his new book, "The Benedict Option: A Strategy for Christians in a Post-Christian Nation." Dreher shares his views on what could happen in America if Christianity fades away and how Christians should live to hold on to their religious identity. 

On Saturday a former Washington state prison inmate will graduate magna cum laude from Seattle University School of Law. But her criminal record may prevent her from practicing law as a licensed attorney.

Courtesy of Morgen Schuler Photography

Have you heard about Ignite Seattle? It’s a volunteer-powered event that started back in 2006.

The concept is simple: People, most of them not public speakers, go on stage in front of 700 or so other people to share part of their life for five minutes.

alcohol beer taps
Flickr Photo/Arvind Grover (CC BY SA 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1SmmftY

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Kendall Jones, from the Washington Beer Blog, and Robyn Schumacher, co-owner and brewer at Stoup Brewing in Ballard, about Washington's longstanding love story with beer. We have more craft beer makers here than any other region in America — 174 of in the Seattle-Tacoma area, according to market researcher Datafiniti. 

A conceptual rending of what the Upstream Music Fest will look like.
Courtesy of Upstream Music Fest

Bill Radke speaks with Rock and Roll Hall of Fame DJ Marco Collins about the Upstream Music Festival. The three day festival in Pioneer Square is the brain child of Microsoft's Paul Allen. This is his way of bringing together local technology and local music. Collins is curating his own stage at the festival and shares some of the music he is excited for this weekend. 

Mackenzie Tolliver and Elisha Edlen, players on the Seattle Majestics.
KUOW Photo/Jeannie Yandel

Jeannie Yandel speaks with two members of the undefeated women’s tackle football team the Seattle Majestics. Elisha Edlen and Mackenzie Tolliver discuss the difficulties in playing and promoting football for women while being overshadowed by the Seahawks (and the local lingerie football league). They also talk about how far the sport has come in recent years and encouraging signs that more and more women are learning that they too can play tackle football.

Meredith Heuer

Bill Radke speaks with Daniel Handler, aka Lemony Snicket, and his wife Lisa Brown about their new book, "Goldfish Ghost." Handler wrote the story and Brown did the illustrations. And as you might guess from the title, it's a kid's story about a dead goldfish. Handler and Brown discuss the new book, why we don't really want happy endings, and the need for loneliness and bewilderment in our daily lives. 

FLICKR PHOTO/Chip Griffin(CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/4xNLFK

Bill Radke speaks with Bremerton Police Chief Steven Strachan about a controversial crossword puzzle published in the New York Times.

Nordstrom's flagship store in Downtown Seattle
flickr photo/ Prayitno (CC BY 2.0)/ https://flic.kr/p/93yEzy

Bill Radke talks to Cal McAllister, co-founder and executive creative director of The Wexley School For Girls, about Nordstrom's expensive, faux mud-caked jeans. 

Jeannie Yandel talks with "Feminist Fight Club" author Jessica Bennett and Harvard Business School doctoral candidate Lizzie Baily Wolf about why getting upset at work is so risky, and Wolf's new research finding co-workers are more tolerant of outward emotion if it's framed as passion for the work. 

Courtesy of Mosaic Voices

Human beings have depended on mythology since the beginning of our existence. Myths told us how the world began, how to understand its trials and wonders, and how it might end.

Yet now, when many of us believe something is not true, we call it a myth. What happened?

Titleist golf ball
FLICKR PHOTO/Tord Sollie(CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/5t5b8M

Bill Radke speaks with Zak Kozuchowski, editor in chief at Golf WRX, about a legal battle over golf balls between Titleist and Costco. The local discount giant has become a major player in the golf world. Costco has sold out of its Kirkland Signature golf balls after online reviews said golfers could save $30 over Titleist brand balls, and these cheaper balls were just as good. Now, Titleist is accusing Costco of patent infringement and false advertising.

USA Women's Hockey Team vs. Finland
FlICKR PHOTO/Alyson Hurt (CC BY-NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/6V3tLR

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Storm co-owner Ginny Gilder about the clash between social justice and economics when it comes to women's sports. The conflict has been in the news with the story of the U.S. Women's Hockey team. After months of ugly public negotiations, the women's team finally is being paid a salary and will receive equal benefits to those on the men's hockey team.  

Do you believe the stars influence your life?

Mar 23, 2017
starry night
Flickr photo/Csaba Berze (CC BY 2.0) HTTP://BIT.LY/2nNkTTz

Some people check their horoscopes and where the planets are positioned every day, while others think it's all "quack babble." 

RadioActive youth producers Livi Thrift and Mimi Hubbard explore what has drawn people to zodiac signs for thousands of years across different cultures. 


Photo courtesy of Nikki Barron

What difference can a day make? For half of the world’s population who struggle with social, economic, and political inequity, a day honoring women may be only symbolic, but could be life changing.

Pages