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life

The Luminata lantern parade begins with a performance on Thursday, September 21, 2017, at Green Lake in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Lanterns of all colors, shapes and sizes illuminated Green Lake on Thursday for the Luminata lantern parade. The parade, hosted by the Fremont Arts Council, signifies the autumn equinox and the beginning of fall. 

Courtesy of Darrell Smart

“I love hearing a lawyer embracing risk.”

Those affirmative words came from professional climbing guide Dallas Glass, speaking with climber Darrell Smart, whose day job is as a litigator.

KUOW Photo/Daniel Berman

Bill Radke and Monica Guzman talk to newcomers about the things that surprised them when they moved to the Seattle area. Guzman is the co-founder of The Evergrey.

Courtesy of Zuheera Ali

My mom, my Hooyo, has a special way of teaching you so much about the world and so little about herself.

She tells you the parts of her life that are going to push you to succeed the way she did, without letting you see the struggles she went through.


Many readers of this blog told us they were inspired by the first story in our series on #nostringscash aid — about a ground-breaking experiment in Kenya to test the benefits of giving poor people a steady stream of cash in place of traditional aid.

But some questioned the ethics of studies like this.

Don’t expect to take in the stellar views from the top of Angel’s Rest anytime soon.

That's just one of popular hiking trails in the Columbia River Gorge that lies inside the perimeter of the Eagle Creek wildfire (see complete list below).

Rachel Pawlitz of the Gorge National Scenic Area says some of the best-known trails in the Gorge – including Multnomah and Wahkeena Falls, Larch Mountain and, of course, Eagle Creek – will be off limits at least until spring.

Flickr photo/Bill Holmes (CC BY-ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/tujYE

Bill Radke talks to Coral Garnick, retail reporter for the Puget Sound Business Journal, about the latest move Nordstrom is making in retail and what is says about the changing industry.

We don't usually think of adorable puppies as disease vectors, but they might actually be making people sick. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is investigating a Campylobacter outbreak in people and its link to puppies purchased from a chain of pet stores.

Latoya Peterson is a gamer, a SJW, and Deputy Editor for Digital Innovation at ESPN's The Undefeated, where she produces stories about the intersection of race, sports and culture.

"You're just data and data doesn't bleed."

Hailey Dawson's favorite thing to do is throw out the first pitch at a baseball game, and thanks to a majority of all the MLB teams, she's going to be doing quite a bit of that in the future.

The first pitch seven-year-old Hailey threw out was at a University of Nevada, Las Vegas Rebels game. The UNLV engineering department had made it possible.

Author and filmmaker Sherman Alexie waits with dancers backstage for his turn on stage as the keynote speaker at a celebration of Indigenous Peoples’ Day Monday, Oct. 10, 2016, at Seattle's City Hall.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Who better to talk sex with than self-described "old, gray-haired dads" Sherman Alexie and Daniel Handler? KUOW’s Bill Radke sat down with the two authors to talk about how adolescence has gone from treehouses in the woods to porn on phones.

A wild Pacific salmon, left, next to an escaped farm-raised Atlantic salmon, right, on Aug. 22 at Home Port Seafoods in Bellingham.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Jeannie Yandel talks to Renee Erickson, Seattle chef, author and owner of The Walrus and The Carpenter, and Barton Seaver, author, chef and the director of the Sustainable Seafood and Health Initiative at Harvard University, about farming seafood and the future of salmon consumption. 

Courtesy of WSDOT/Ally Barrera

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Ally Barrera and Mike Allende, the minds behind two of Washington Department of Transportation's Twitter accounts, @wsdot and @wsdot_traffic. They are known for posting gifs, memes and hand drawn maps to make Seattle area traffic just a little less awful. 

It's not just what you say that matters. It's how you say it.

Take the phrase, "Here's Johnny." When Ed McMahon used it to introduce Johnny Carson on The Tonight Show, the words were an enthusiastic greeting. But in The Shining, Jack Nicholson used the same two words to convey murderous intent.

The statue of Vladimir Lenin in Seattle's Fremont neighborhood.
Flickr Photo/Martin Deutsch (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/o6EKZs

Jeannie Yandel speaks with multiple people about the statue of Vladimir Lenin in the Fremont neighborhood. 

Courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech

Jeannie Yandel talks to University of Washington associate professor Joe Janes about the Golden Records, a NASA project that compiled sounds and images from earth to send up with NASA's Voyager spacecraft in the hopes of it reaching extraterrestrial life.

Confederate flag
Flickr Photo/pixxiestails (CC BY NC 2.0)

Jeannie Yandel talks to Melanie McFarland, T.V. critic for Salon, and Mike Pesca, host of The Gist, about a proposed HBO show called Confederate. The show imagines a world where the South won the Civil War, slavery still exists in parts of the United States and the country is on the brink of it's third civil war. 

technology computer keyboard
Flicker Photo/Leslee Lazar (CC-BY-NC-ND)

There’s a stereotype of tech workers that’s been circulating for some time now. It says the programmer checklist goes something like this:

Glasses repaired with tape.

Wears shorts and sandals at all times.

Works alone, possibly from parents’ basement.

Courtesy of Libby Lewis Photography

Since 1994, the Seattle Arts & Lectures Writers in the Schools (WITS) program brings professional writers into classrooms to help student writers find their voices and hone their skills. 

Bill Radke talks to Dave Zirin, sports editor for The Nation, about Seahawks player Michael Bennett's decision to sit during the national anthem at the Seahawks' first pre-season game against the San Diego Chargers. 

Here's what we've been told about passwords:

  • Make them complicated.
  • Use numbers, question marks and hash marks.
  • Change them regularly.
  • Use different passwords for each app and website.

These guidelines often leave users frustrated and struggling to remember them all.

Think about the last time you were bored — seriously and persistently bored.

Maybe you had to carry out some mind-numbing repetitive task for hours on end, or maybe you were just trapped at the airport or train station, waiting out a lengthy delay without a good conversational partner, book, or movie. You look at a clock and it seems to move at a surreal, glacial pace.

Mount Rainier, or Tahoma, Tacobet, Ti'Swaq or Pooskaus.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Washington state and federal officials want to make it easier for you to access the state's many parks and recreation areas.

Right now, there are about 20 different kinds of passes, leading to a lot of confusion for park goers. 

Phillip Chavira and Shontina Vernon
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks to Phillip Chavira, executive director of Intiman Theatre in Seattle, and Shontina Vernon, Seattle writer and musician, about what makes art inclusive.

Well-trained guide dogs are important for visually impaired people who rely on them. But many puppies bred to be guide dogs flunk out of training programs.

A study published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences suggests the way a puppy's mother raises it may be the key to the dog's success, or failure. A research team at the University of Pennsylvania found that puppies destined for guide dog training are more likely to fail if they're coddled by their mothers.

Ijeoma Oluo
Courtesy of Ijeoma Oluo

Editor's note: Salty language ahead.

We are now less than two months away from the ascendency of the Great Orange Hate Clown. 

Courtesy of Larry Krackle

Last year around this time we presented a gathering of tales from a festival of storytelling at PowellsWood Garden, down in Federal Way, Washington. It was an ear-opening experience, not just for the occasional jet approaching Sea-Tac, but as a reminder of the power of well-told stories. 

Bill Radke speaks with hydroplane drivers Brent Hall and Jerry Hopp about their love of racing. Hall speaks about his childhood dreams of being behind the wheel of a hydroplane and what it was like to start racing at the age of 36. Hopp talks about his long hydroplane career, racing for almost fifty years. And both of them explain some of the finer points of Seafair's most popular sport. 

Lost in translation: growing up Latin-ish

Aug 2, 2017
KUOW photo/April Reyes

Radioactive’s Isabella Ortiz and Diego Villarroel discuss the complexities of ethnic and cultural identity, speaking from their own experiences as a part of the latinx community. Neither of them learned Spanish growing up, and they share how intimidating it can feel to discover their cultures as young adults.

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