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life

When you push through the pumpkin-orange door into the cozy, diner-shaped Florence Pie Bar, you're likely to find a table of new moms with their babies or another of old friends: Groups delighting in neighborly conversation, old-fashioned community and a slice of comfort.

Author Celeste Ng at KUOW in October, 2017.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Celeste Ng’s sophomore novel, "Little Fires Everywhere," is set in her hometown of Shaker Heights, Ohio. But she sees more than a few commonalities between her town and ours.

“Seattle, like Shaker Heights, tries to live with its eyes on the world,” Ng said, speaking with Bill Radke on KUOW's The Record

Light shines through a poster with a photograph of a displaced child as students from Morningside Academy gather around the Forced From Home exhibit on Tuesday, October 3, 2017, at the South Lake Union Discovery Center in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

As the Trump administration plans to reduce the number of refugees entering the country, Doctors Without Borders wants to show you just what it's like to be driven out of your home, and forced to find a new place to live. 

Oren Etzioni and Max Tegmark in the KUOW Green Room.
KUOW PHOTO/JASON PAGANO

Tesla CEO Elon Musk made headlines when he urged leaders to intervene in the quest for artificial intelligence, saying the technology “is a fundamental existential risk for human civilization.”

Musk painted a frightening picture of a future where an AI arms race could lead to apocalyptic outcomes for humanity. But KUOW’s Bill Radke recently talked with two AI experts who take a more optimistic view on the role intelligent machines can play in our future.

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Courtesy of Alan Berner

The cover article of this year’s June issue of The Atlantic magazine concerned a woman called Lola. “My Family’s Slave” was written by Alex Tizon, a Pulitzer Prize-winning Filipino-American writer.

Lola had lived with the Tizon family and cared for them since before Alex Tizon was born. She had come with them from the Philippines to the United States. To Tizon and his siblings, it had always seemed like she was part of the family, until it didn’t.

1 In 5 Teens Reports A Concussion Diagnosis

Sep 26, 2017

Concussions have gotten a lot of attention in recent years, especially as professional football players' brains have shown signs of degenerative brain disease linked with repeated blows to the head. Now, a new analysis confirms what many doctors fear — that concussions start showing up at a high rate in teens who are active in contact sports.

This story comes from NPR's Rough Translation podcast, which explores how ideas we wrestle with in the U.S. are being discussed in the rest of the world.

Sophia Lierenfeld didn't set out to give dating advice to Syrian refugees.

Bill Radke talks with sportswriters Percy Allen and Michael-Shawn Dugar about the protests that rippled across the entire NFL schedule after President Trump said he'd love to see owners fire players for disrespecting the national anthem.

The Luminata lantern parade begins with a performance on Thursday, September 21, 2017, at Green Lake in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Lanterns of all colors, shapes and sizes illuminated Green Lake on Thursday for the Luminata lantern parade. The parade, hosted by the Fremont Arts Council, signifies the autumn equinox and the beginning of fall. 

Courtesy of Darrell Smart

“I love hearing a lawyer embracing risk.”

Those affirmative words came from professional climbing guide Dallas Glass, speaking with climber Darrell Smart, whose day job is as a litigator.

KUOW Photo/Daniel Berman

Bill Radke and Monica Guzman talk to newcomers about the things that surprised them when they moved to the Seattle area. Guzman is the co-founder of The Evergrey.

Courtesy of Zuheera Ali

My mom, my Hooyo, has a special way of teaching you so much about the world and so little about herself.

She tells you the parts of her life that are going to push you to succeed the way she did, without letting you see the struggles she went through.


Many readers of this blog told us they were inspired by the first story in our series on #nostringscash aid — about a ground-breaking experiment in Kenya to test the benefits of giving poor people a steady stream of cash in place of traditional aid.

But some questioned the ethics of studies like this.

Don’t expect to take in the stellar views from the top of Angel’s Rest anytime soon.

That's just one of popular hiking trails in the Columbia River Gorge that lies inside the perimeter of the Eagle Creek wildfire (see complete list below).

Rachel Pawlitz of the Gorge National Scenic Area says some of the best-known trails in the Gorge – including Multnomah and Wahkeena Falls, Larch Mountain and, of course, Eagle Creek – will be off limits at least until spring.

Flickr photo/Bill Holmes (CC BY-ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/tujYE

Bill Radke talks to Coral Garnick, retail reporter for the Puget Sound Business Journal, about the latest move Nordstrom is making in retail and what is says about the changing industry.

We don't usually think of adorable puppies as disease vectors, but they might actually be making people sick. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is investigating a Campylobacter outbreak in people and its link to puppies purchased from a chain of pet stores.

Latoya Peterson is a gamer, a SJW, and Deputy Editor for Digital Innovation at ESPN's The Undefeated, where she produces stories about the intersection of race, sports and culture.

"You're just data and data doesn't bleed."

Hailey Dawson's favorite thing to do is throw out the first pitch at a baseball game, and thanks to a majority of all the MLB teams, she's going to be doing quite a bit of that in the future.

The first pitch seven-year-old Hailey threw out was at a University of Nevada, Las Vegas Rebels game. The UNLV engineering department had made it possible.

Author and filmmaker Sherman Alexie waits with dancers backstage for his turn on stage as the keynote speaker at a celebration of Indigenous Peoples’ Day Monday, Oct. 10, 2016, at Seattle's City Hall.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Who better to talk sex with than self-described "old, gray-haired dads" Sherman Alexie and Daniel Handler? KUOW’s Bill Radke sat down with the two authors to talk about how adolescence has gone from treehouses in the woods to porn on phones.

A wild Pacific salmon, left, next to an escaped farm-raised Atlantic salmon, right, on Aug. 22 at Home Port Seafoods in Bellingham.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Jeannie Yandel talks to Renee Erickson, Seattle chef, author and owner of The Walrus and The Carpenter, and Barton Seaver, author, chef and the director of the Sustainable Seafood and Health Initiative at Harvard University, about farming seafood and the future of salmon consumption. 

Courtesy of WSDOT/Ally Barrera

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Ally Barrera and Mike Allende, the minds behind two of Washington Department of Transportation's Twitter accounts, @wsdot and @wsdot_traffic. They are known for posting gifs, memes and hand drawn maps to make Seattle area traffic just a little less awful. 

It's not just what you say that matters. It's how you say it.

Take the phrase, "Here's Johnny." When Ed McMahon used it to introduce Johnny Carson on The Tonight Show, the words were an enthusiastic greeting. But in The Shining, Jack Nicholson used the same two words to convey murderous intent.

The statue of Vladimir Lenin in Seattle's Fremont neighborhood.
Flickr Photo/Martin Deutsch (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/o6EKZs

Jeannie Yandel speaks with multiple people about the statue of Vladimir Lenin in the Fremont neighborhood. 

Courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech

Jeannie Yandel talks to University of Washington associate professor Joe Janes about the Golden Records, a NASA project that compiled sounds and images from earth to send up with NASA's Voyager spacecraft in the hopes of it reaching extraterrestrial life.

Confederate flag
Flickr Photo/pixxiestails (CC BY NC 2.0)

Jeannie Yandel talks to Melanie McFarland, T.V. critic for Salon, and Mike Pesca, host of The Gist, about a proposed HBO show called Confederate. The show imagines a world where the South won the Civil War, slavery still exists in parts of the United States and the country is on the brink of it's third civil war. 

technology computer keyboard
Flicker Photo/Leslee Lazar (CC-BY-NC-ND)

There’s a stereotype of tech workers that’s been circulating for some time now. It says the programmer checklist goes something like this:

Glasses repaired with tape.

Wears shorts and sandals at all times.

Works alone, possibly from parents’ basement.

Courtesy of Libby Lewis Photography

Since 1994, the Seattle Arts & Lectures Writers in the Schools (WITS) program brings professional writers into classrooms to help student writers find their voices and hone their skills. 

Bill Radke talks to Dave Zirin, sports editor for The Nation, about Seahawks player Michael Bennett's decision to sit during the national anthem at the Seahawks' first pre-season game against the San Diego Chargers. 

Here's what we've been told about passwords:

  • Make them complicated.
  • Use numbers, question marks and hash marks.
  • Change them regularly.
  • Use different passwords for each app and website.

These guidelines often leave users frustrated and struggling to remember them all.

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