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life

technology computer keyboard
Flicker Photo/Leslee Lazar (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Bill Radke speaks with Claire Cain Miller, a reporter with Upshot for the New York Times, about her article that looks at the stereotype of tech workers as loner genius nerds and why it is dangerous to perpetuate that myth. 

Courtesy of Libby Lewis Photography

Since 1994, the Seattle Arts & Lectures Writers in the Schools (WITS) program brings professional writers into classrooms to help student writers find their voices and hone their skills. 

Bill Radke talks to Dave Zirin, sports editor for The Nation, about Seahawks player Michael Bennett's decision to sit during the national anthem at the Seahawks' first pre-season game against the San Diego Chargers. 

Here's what we've been told about passwords:

  • Make them complicated.
  • Use numbers, question marks and hash marks.
  • Change them regularly.
  • Use different passwords for each app and website.

These guidelines often leave users frustrated and struggling to remember them all.

Think about the last time you were bored — seriously and persistently bored.

Maybe you had to carry out some mind-numbing repetitive task for hours on end, or maybe you were just trapped at the airport or train station, waiting out a lengthy delay without a good conversational partner, book, or movie. You look at a clock and it seems to move at a surreal, glacial pace.

Mount Rainier, or Tahoma, Tacobet, Ti'Swaq or Pooskaus.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Washington state and federal officials want to make it easier for you to access the state's many parks and recreation areas.

Right now, there are about 20 different kinds of passes, leading to a lot of confusion for park goers. 

Phillip Chavira and Shontina Vernon
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks to Phillip Chavira, executive director of Intiman Theatre in Seattle, and Shontina Vernon, Seattle writer and musician, about what makes art inclusive.

Well-trained guide dogs are important for visually impaired people who rely on them. But many puppies bred to be guide dogs flunk out of training programs.

A study published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences suggests the way a puppy's mother raises it may be the key to the dog's success, or failure. A research team at the University of Pennsylvania found that puppies destined for guide dog training are more likely to fail if they're coddled by their mothers.

Courtesy of Larry Krackle

Last year around this time we presented a gathering of tales from a festival of storytelling at PowellsWood Garden, down in Federal Way, Washington. It was an ear-opening experience, not just for the occasional jet approaching Sea-Tac, but as a reminder of the power of well-told stories. 

Bill Radke speaks with hydroplane drivers Brent Hall and Jerry Hopp about their love of racing. Hall speaks about his childhood dreams of being behind the wheel of a hydroplane and what it was like to start racing at the age of 36. Hopp talks about his long hydroplane career, racing for almost fifty years. And both of them explain some of the finer points of Seafair's most popular sport. 

Lost in translation: growing up Latin-ish

Aug 2, 2017
KUOW photo/April Reyes

Radioactive’s Isabella Ortiz and Diego Villarroel discuss the complexities of ethnic and cultural identity, speaking from their own experiences as a part of the latinx community. Neither of them learned Spanish growing up, and they share how intimidating it can feel to discover their cultures as young adults.

KUOW Photo/ Bond Huberman

Bill Radke talks to Seafair's King Neptune, John Roderick, and Queen Alcyone, Angela Shen, about the cultural resonance of this decades old festival. Roderick is a Seattle musician and Shen is the founder and CEO of Savor Seattle Food Tours, in their day jobs.

Dumi Maraire, the hip hop artist better known as Draze, will be performing at Northwest Folklife Festival this weekend.
Facebook Photo/Draze

Seattle hip hop artist Draze is known for lamenting the gentrification of the Central District. Now, he has an idea for how to turn things around.  

He wants to help launch 100 African-American-owned businesses in one calendar year. 


File: Magnuson Park movie night, 2015.
Google Maps

If you were hoping to make it to movie night at Magnuson Park in the next few weeks, you're out of luck.

The outdoor movie series has been canceled part way through the season.

A woman was killed in a climbing accident in Washington’s North Cascades National Park over the weekend.




After we posted this story about the costs and implications of micromanagement, we received over 1,000 responses on Facebook, some of them sharing references to the 1990s cult classic movie Office Space and many of them relating their own stories of dealing with intense scrutiny from supervisors.

So we asked Steve Motenko, a Seattle-based executive coach, to give us some thoughts on your responses.

Hiking a trail off Snoqualmie Pass. But we're not telling you where, because the photographer wants to keep it to herself.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Bill Radke speaks with Fitz Cahall, host of the podcast The Dirtbag Dairies, and  Jill Simmons, executive director of the Washington Trails Association, about the impact that our region's growing population is having on hiking trails around Washington. 

Jim Schott had one goal when he abandoned academic life to start the company called Haystack Mountain: He wanted to make some of the finest goat cheese in the country. With cheese in hand, he visited supermarkets, trying to persuade them to sell his product. Some didn't take him seriously. But Whole Foods did.

"From the very beginning, they wanted to taste it," Schott recalls. "And they wanted to know the story. They wanted to know where the cheese came from; who was making it; where it was made."

The final scramble is on to see the total eclipse on Aug. 21 in the Northwest. Most hotels and campgrounds in the path of totality are booked.

But for those willing to do some research, or pay handsomely, there are still eclipse adventures to be had.

In an essay on Jane Austen, Virginia Woolf observed, "Of all great writers she is the most difficult to catch in the act of greatness."

To that double-edged and astute assessment, one can add, she is also the most difficult to catch in the act of tea-time.

This observation might seem irksomely contrarian to the legions of Janeites in hats and bonnets gathered around tea and scones to pay fealty to the novelist on the bicentenary of her death, which falls today.

Suham Albayati, right, originally from Baghdad, arranges items on her table at the Kent East Hill Farmer's Market on Friday, June 30, 2017, at Morrill Meadows Park in Kent.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

It's not easy to find quality produce in the East Hill neighborhood in Kent. For the low-income immigrants who live in the community, it's a trek to ride a bus or walk to and from a grocery store.

So Living Well Kent came up with the idea to start a farmer's market. Once a month the community-led organization partners with groups like Washington's Tilth Alliance to offer organic produce and locally made crafts.

Katherine Banwell of our Race and Equity team visited the market recently and has this audio postcard.


Texting or holding a phone to your ear while driving is already illegal in Washington state. But starting Sunday, Washington state troopers and local police will begin enforcing a toughened law against distracted driving.

When my editors asked me to report on forest bathing, I packed a swimsuit. I assumed it must involve a dip in the water.

It turns out, my interpretation was too literal.

I met certified Forest Therapy guide Melanie Choukas-Bradley and several other women who'd come along for the adventure at the footbridge to Theodore Roosevelt Island, a dense jungle of an urban forest along the Potomac River in Washington, D.C.

Teddy Fischer's first big scoop as a journalist started out as lark.

Arundhati Roy in 2017.
Flickr Photo/Chris Boland (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/www.chrisboland.com

When an acclaimed novelist publishes their first new work in 20 years, people take notice.

When the first book was Arundhati Roy’s “The God of Small Things,” the interest is especially intense. She was awarded the esteemed Booker Prize for the best novel in the English language in 1997.

Roy’s new work is “The Ministry of Utmost Happiness.” The novel concerns, as she suggests in the text itself, “the vast, violent, circling, driving, ridiculous, insane, unfeasible, public turmoil of a nation.”

Bill Radke speaks with Mary Mann, author of "Yawn: Adventures in Boredom." Mann discusses her research into why we get bored, the good that can come out of boredom and some of the ways people have tried to fight boredom through the years. One of those ways involves a study where people chose to give themselves electric shocks rather than sit silently in a room. 

Is it time for a change to King's Court?

Jul 11, 2017
King's Court at Safeco Field
Flickr Photo/Nekonomist (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/emf7pu

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Times sports columnist Larry Stone about why he thinks Mariners fans should change the King's Court, a special cheering section at Safeco Field for pitcher Felix Hernandez.  

Display at the Valentinetti Puppet Museum in downtown Bremerton, Washington.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Starting Monday it will only take half an hour to reach Bremerton if you take Kitsap Transit’s fast ferry. It runs from the King County dock just south of Colman dock – the one used by the water taxis – to a dock close to WSDOT’s car ferry terminal in Bremerton.

Until today, a car trip from downtown Seattle to Snohomish County took less time than a ferry trip to Bremerton. Now, the opposite is true. 

When Kelly Barrales-Saylor was a new mom, she got a lot of children's books as gifts. Most were simple books about shapes, colors and letters. There were none about science — or math.

"My editorial brain lit up and said there must be a need for this," says Barrales-Saylor, who works as an editor for a publishing company outside Chicago.

Halfway across the world, Chris Ferrie was similarly unsatisfied.

When reading to his kids, Ferrie noticed that most books used animals to introduce new words. In today's world, that just didn't make sense to him.

Ballard Locks under construction, 1913
FLICKR PHOTO/SEATTLE MUNICIPAL ARCHIVES (CC BY 2.0)/HTTPS://FLIC.KR/P/4TIHT9

This story originally aired in 2005. We loved it so much that we dug it out again in honor of the Ballard Locks' 100 year anniversary on July 4, 2017.

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