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It's been a tough winter so far for many Cascade Mountains ski resorts. Five in Oregon and Washington have suspended operations until they get more snow.

Workers at the Summit at Snoqualmie are even gathering snow from parking lots and building edges and moving it uphill to keep a few runs open.

Nationally, the Pacific Northwest stands out for its low reliance on snowmaking, but that may change.

A ‘lifesaver’ for the resort

On the eve of the Super Bowl, Washington state lawmakers are considering whether to legalize fantasy sports contests.

12 seahawks
Flickr Photo/Yuri Levchenko (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Seahawks fever is alive and well across the state, with cities taking on nicknames in advance of the new name: Shermmamish, Pete Angeles, Hawkilteo. We could go on… and we will. Also, this week: Why did a Seattle police officer hassle a 69-year-old man over a golf club? Will Washington state abolish the death penalty? Should cyclists have to pay a toll to roll on the new 520 bridge? And why is Bill Gates worried about artificial intelligence?

Bill Radke makes sense of these stories and more with Crosscut's Knute Berger, The Stranger's Eli Sanders and news analyst Joni Balter.

Seahawks Legion of Boom members Jeremy Lane, Earl Thomas and Richard Sherman show off the trophy at the Super Bowl parade last January. The organization wans to trademark "boom" and the number 12.
Flickr Photo/Bernie Zimmermann (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with linguist Ben Zimmer about the Seattle Seahawks'  bid to trademark the number 12 and the word "boom."

Since his arrest last year, William Wingate, a 70-year-old veteran and retired bus driver, no longer stands up for the Seattle Police Department in conversations with his siblings.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

The Seattle Police officer involved in a case involving the arrest of a senior citizen has been reassigned to a job where she has no contact with the public.

The move follows public outcry over a dashboard video showing the arrest of William Wingate, an elderly black man who had been standing on a Capitol Hill corner, leaning on his golf club.

At a time when Americans consume, on average, only about one serving of fruit and one serving of vegetables a day when we're supposed to consume five to 13 servings, the appeal of juice and smoothies is pretty obvious.

Juice can be a convenient way to get more servings of fruit and veggies. And, hey, making your own juice concoctions at home can be fun.

So, here's the question: What's the better gadget, a juicer or a blender? Does one do a better job of boosting the nutrients in the fruit (and veggies)?

It’s long been against the law to text and drive in Washington, but the rules would get much stricter under a proposal introduced Wednesday in the legislature.

PHOTOS: Amazing Sculptures Made By A Student Who 'Didn't Know What She Was Doing'

Jan 29, 2015
Courtesy of Amal Ahmed

What makes an artist? A high school art student inadvertently stumbled upon a technique to make ridiculously cool, award-winning sculptures -- using something you have lying around the house. Listen in to learn how. 

Plus, a 15-year-old sculptor ponders the dilemma between making art for himself and making the Disney princesses his classmates want to buy. 

Flickr Photo/Philip Robertson

In recent weeks, the 12th Man has been more ubiquitous in Seattle than rainfall (actually, we’ve been having pretty mild weather).

The flying flags, Blue Fridays and produce displays actually have a psychological and evolutionary basis, according to Eric Simons, author of “The Secret Lives of Sports Fans.”

Author Wes Moore takes questions at an event with the American Library Association in January 2014.
Flickr Photo/ALA (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Troubled youth to Rhodes Scholar.

U.S. Army paratrooper to White House fellow.

Wall Street banker to author and television host.

That’s a brief synopsis of the life path of Wes Moore, so far. He came to fame in 2010 when his first book “The Other Wes Moore: One Name, Two Fates” became a New York Times best seller. 

File photo. apartment housing apt door
Flickr Photo/Matthew Piatt (CC-BY-NC-ND)

If you are looking for more evidence of a housing crisis in King County, here it is.

Officials at the King County Housing Authority report a flood of people applying for federal housing assistance.

On Wednesday, after a four year hiatus, the authority once again began accepting applications for the federal Housing Choice Voucher Program, more commonly called Section 8.

You want a cup of decaf. Your significant other is craving the fully caffeinated stuff. With the simple push of a button, Keurig's single-serving K-Cup coffee pods can make both of you happy.

But those convenient little plastic pods can pile up quickly, and they're not recyclable. And that's created a monster of an environmental mess, says Mike Hachey. Literally.

KUOW Photo/Hannah Burn

Ross Reynolds talks with e-sport champion Yiliang "DoubleLift" Peng about the hard path he took to becoming a professional gamer.

Flickr Photo/Kartik Ramanathan (CC-BY-NC-ND)

A night so black you can’t see your hand waving in front of your face. So dark you could just reach out and grab a star.

True darkness is daunting and mesmerizing. For city slickers, it can be terrifying. And according to author Paul Bogard, it is necessary.

Pope Francis over the weekend became the first pontiff to hold a private meeting with a transgender person. It’s one of many firsts for Pope Francis that have been seen as promoting greater inclusiveness in the church.

But what about women in the church? According to a Georgetown University study, 72 percent of nuns in the U.S. have left the church in the last five decades, compared with 35 percent of priests.

Just six years ago, the Vatican’s launch of an investigation into American nuns sparked outrage, but the release of the report in December was more warmly received.

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