life

New Horizons and Seattle's Union Gospel Mission are opening a new shelter downtown for youth only.
KUOW Photo/Jamala Henderson

As Seattle struggles through a homelessness crisis, more services are coming online to help meet additional need. 

A new privately funded young adult emergency shelter will open downtown starting Sunday.

Betu Allami (left) and Nayyef Hrebid (right) met in 2004, during the seige of Ramadi. Hrebid was a translator with the U.S. Marines, and Allami was an Iraqi soldier. "I saw him," says Hrebid, 'and I was like, oh my God, he is so handsome. He is perfect.'
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

This is a story about love and war; love lost and love found again.

In 2004, Nayyef Hrebid was an interpreter for the U.S. Marines in Iraq, and Betu Allami was a soldier with the Iraqi Army.

Ramadi General Hospital had been taken over by insurgents, and Hrebid and Allami were part of a mission to reclaim the hospital. It was a dangerous mission, in a dangerous city, at a dangerous time in the war. 

Hollywood producer Ross Putman says he's read thousands of scripts during his time working in the film industry in Los Angeles, and over the years, he began to find one pattern particularly problematic: the way female characters are introduced.

Here's a sampling: leggy, attractive, blonde, beautiful, hot, gorgeous, pretty, sexy.

The StoryCorps 'Finding Our Way' event at The Gates Foundation, Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Caroline Dodge

When StoryCorps came to Seattle’s New Holly neighborhood last summer, people from all over the city took the opportunity to visit with a friend or family member and record a conversation. Their stories can stop you in your tracks.

Who is among the least likely to use online dating sites?

A few years ago, you would have been correct to guess college students or those in their early 20s, a group surrounded by peers and in the prime of their bar-hopping years. But a newly released Pew Research Center study finds the use of online dating sites by 18- to 24-year-olds has nearly tripled just since 2013, making this group now the most likely to use the Web to find partners.

Lisa Sawyer and Steven Drogosz are living in a hotel in SeaTac
KUOW Photo/Kate Walters

Lisa Sawyer and Steven Drogosz have been together for about six years. They met volunteering at a food bank, they noticed each other and one thing led to another.

Flickr Photo/Christopher Cook (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/CHoGCh

Bill Radke talks to Onnie Rogers, research assistant professor at the University of Washington's Institute for Learning and Brain Sciences about her work on how stereotypes affect young black men. 

A toll area on Interstate 405.
Flickr Photo/SounderBruce (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/ruiWYC

Bill Radke talks with Debbie Jaksich, program manager for King County's Communities In Motion program about the benefits of carpooling.

There's been a male tilt to biomedical research for a long time.

The National Institutes of Health is trying to change that and is looking to bring gender balance all the way down to the earliest stages of research. As a condition of NIH funding, researchers will now have to include female and male animals in their biomedical studies.

As late as the 1990s, researchers worried that testing drugs in women who could be pregnant or become pregnant might lead to birth defects, so experimental drugs were mainly tested in men. Research in animals followed the same pattern.

Some people ride the bus to work. Some rent a bus to party on. So-called party buses have been in the news a lot in recent years because of accidents and deaths across the country.

 Running back Marshawn Lynch talks with reporters on Jan. 27, 2015.
Flickr Photo/WEBN-TV (CC BY ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/qXNecT

Bill Radke talks with Mike Pesca of Slate's "The Gist" podcast about Seattle Seahawks running back Marshawn Lynch's unusual retirement announcement on Sunday. Lynch took to Twitter during the Super Bowl to post a photo of a pair of cleats hanging from telephone wires. 

Nancy Pearl
KUOW Photo

When book-loving KUOW listeners are at a loss for what to read next, help is just a phone call away – as long as the call is to "Book Lust" author Nancy Pearl.

This week, Nancy and KUOW's Marcie Sillman help a listener in Clinton, Washington who loved the "The Bone Tree" by Greg Iles. 

Nancy's picks include: "Time's Witness" and "Uncivil Seasons" by Michael Malone, "Black Water Rising" and "Pleasantville" by Attica Locke, and Angela Flournoy's debut novel, "The Turner House."

Want Nancy Pearl to help pick your next great read? Call 206.221.3663 and tell us about a book you loved – one you wish you could read again for the first time – and we'll patch you through to Seattle's favorite librarian to see if she can guide you to your next book.

The Record: Monday, Feb. 8, Full Show

Feb 8, 2016
KUOW Photo

Poppycock and bullfeathers: That's the Governor's reaction to the firing of Washington state's transportation chief. We'll tell you what happened and what it means. Also, some of yesterday's Super Bowl ads featured local companies. Did they pull off what they were trying to do? And the first Washingtonian to get a life sentence and then get released will tell you his story.

Listen to the full show above or check out the individual stories:

File Photo: Gender neutral toilet sign in London.
Flickr Photo/Cory Doctorow (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/qUDxsQ

Bill Radke talks with Betsy White about why she's opposed to a bill that would prevent people from using bathrooms and lockers rooms that are consistent with their gender identities. White, a Spokane resident, is the mother of an 8-year-old transgender girl.

The problems with high lead levels in Flint, Mich.'s water started in April 2014, when the city switched water sources and began drawing its supply from the Flint River. The new water was harder, and government officials allowed it to corrode the city's pipes, leaching lead and other toxins into the tap water.

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