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The New York Giants have released kicker Josh Brown over his admitted abuse of his then-wife, in a case that has previously raised questions about the NFL's willingness to punish players who commit acts of domestic violence.

"We believed we did the right thing at every juncture in our relationship with Josh," team President John Mara said in a statement. "Our beliefs, our judgments and our decisions were misguided. We accept that responsibility."

With the presidential election days away — and media attention at full force — let's take a moment to consider some random facts that are not about the election:

1. Seahorses are nearly unique in the animal kingdom in that males carry the fertilized eggs after breeding and eventually "give birth." The number of offspring can reach thousands.

New research finds little lies pave the way for big ones.

Courtesy of Alex Czopp

Earlier this month, a tape of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump bragging about groping women sent his campaign into turmoil.

But it's not just Trump on that recording. You can also hear Trump being encouraged by former Today Show host Billy Bush.

Bicycles are a type of vehicle so they belong on the road, right?

This is how the wheels turn in places such as New York City and San Francisco, where bicyclists older than age 13 are banned from riding on the sidewalk. Similar laws exist in many cities and towns throughout the country, such as Columbus, Ohio, and Chapel Hill, N.C.

That's not the case everywhere, though. In Boston and Washington, D.C., sidewalk cycling is allowed — with the exception of the downtown areas. But just because bicyclists are allowed to ride on the sidewalk doesn't mean they are welcome there.

(Clockwise from top left) Claire Miccio and baby John, Kris 'Sonics Guy' Brannon, Maliah Washington, Jessica Salvador, Lance Forshay and Andrew Scudder, and Paul Constantine.
KUOW Photos/John O'Brien

A question arose this election season, as it does periodically: How well do U.S. citizens and candidates for public office understand and value the contents of the Constitution of the United States?

Developmental psychologist Alison Gopnik
Wikimedia Photo/Kathleen King

The concept of "parenting" has only been around since the 1960s. Child development researcher Alison Gopnik believes our modern views on child raising do a disservice to children’s ability to thrive.

Gopnik is a professor of psychology and philosophy at University of California, Berkeley, where she directs the Gopnik Cognitive Development Lab. Her new book is “The Gardener and the Carpenter: What the New Science of Child Development Tells Us About the Relationship Between Parents and Children.”

She spoke at Town Hall Seattle on October 3. Sonya Harris recorded her talk.

Omar Ali with his family. Omar is standing fourth form the left holding his daughter.
Courtesy of Awal Ibrahim

Recently, my whole family got together to celebrate my sister’s graduation. Everyone was very excited.

But my family wasn’t always all together here in Seattle. My uncle Omar Ali is responsible for us being together at this exact moment.

For many of us, simply running a marathon is a serious challenge.

But Michal Kapral, a 44-year-old editor from Toronto, had a more difficult goal in mind. He wanted to run a marathon ... while juggling ... without dropping a ball even once.

And he did it at the Chicago Marathon on Sunday, at the brisk clip of 2 hours and 55 minutes. That's a pace of about 6:40 per mile.

Athit Perawongmetha/Reuters

The death of the world’s longest-reigning monarch should come as no surprise.

After all, at 88, King Bhumibol Adulyadej of Thailand was clinging to life. His public appearances had grown extremely rare and, when he did speak, his voice was woefully faint. His death, apparently from organ failure, was hardly unexpected.

Yet Thais are nevertheless reeling, not only with grief but with angst.

Gabriella Garrett, Colleen Andersonn Marci Oliveri went for a ride on the earthquake simulator Tuesday afternoon.
KUOW Photo/Katherine Banwell

The city of Seattle invited the public to a "Big Shaker" event Tuesday at Westlake Park to be part of an earthquake simulation and nudge people to prepare for the inevitable.

KUOW's Katherine Banwell went along for the ride and sent us this audio postcard featuring Dean Reese, CEO of Ready America; simulator participants Gabriella Garrett, Colleen Anderson and Marci Oliveri; and Matt Auflick of the Seattle Office of Emergency Management.

Matt Remle drafted the resolution adopted by the Seattle City Council recognizing the ongoing negative consequences of the American Indian boarding schools
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Monday is Seattle's third annual celebration of Indigenous People's Day. We asked members of our local indigenous community to share what it means to them. 

Last October, Goats and Soda began a series called #15Girls. The stories explored the lives of 15-year-olds who sought to take control and change their fate — despite daunting obstacles.

It's been a year, and we wanted to check back with the girls we profiled and see how their lives have changed. We weren't able to reach them all, but we did find out how five of the teens are faring in 2016.

With her infant son in a sling, Monique Black strolls through a weekend open house in the gentrified Shaw neighborhood of Washington, D.C. There are lots of factors to consider when looking for a home — in this one, Monique notices, the tiny window in the second bedroom doesn't let in enough light. But for parents like Black and her husband, Jonny, there's a more important question: How good are the nearby schools?

Issa Rae knows she is committing a revolutionary act by simply creating a TV show centered on an average black woman's life.

And she can't believe it.

"Isn't it sad that it's revolutionary?" says Rae, whose new comedy Insecure, debuts on HBO Sunday night. "It's so basic ... but we don't get to do that. We don't get to just have a show about regular black people being basic."