LGBTQ

During Pride weekend, Seattle’s Capitol Hill neighborhood will host a march and party specifically for transgender people - the T in LGBT.

From Queensryche's Facebook page.

President Obama Visits Africa
President Obama is making his third and longest trip to Africa, his first visit since winning reelection. The president intends to “reinforce the US' commitment to expanding economic growth” in Africa. We talk with Witney Schneidman, nonresident fellow with the Africa Growth Initiative.

Art Of Our City: Dueling Queensrÿches
Fans of the Seattle band Queensrÿche have a lot be psyched about this week: a brand new album and two live shows. Queensrÿche performed last night at The Crocodile, and they’ll perform again this Saturday night at The Moore. Problem is, it’s actually two different bands, both using the name Queensrÿche. Following a huge fight last summer, the band split in two. What’s going on here? Decibel Magazine editor-in-chief Albert Mudrian helps us sort it out.

Seattle Transgender Pride
The Supreme Court struck down the Defense of Marriage Act this week, paving the way for same-sex married couples to receive the same federal rights and protections afforded to heterosexuals. The ruling is celebrated within the LGBT community as a huge step towards equality. But for transgender people – the T in LGBT – discrimination and inequality is still a very real and pressing threat across the country.

Idaho's conflicting views on gay rights is playing out in the northern part of the state. A committee in Coeur d'Alene Tuesday advanced an anti-discrimination ordinance. Meanwhile the sheriff of the same county is threatening to drop a Boy Scout charter because the group voted to allow gay members.

Same Sex Marriage: What Happens Next?

May 1, 2013
AP Photo/Brennan Linsley

Last November Washington became the first state to legalize same sex marriage at the polls but today we want to check in on what is happening with the same-sex marriage debate in and out of the Evergreen State.

Coming Out: The Mavericks

May 1, 2013
AP Photo/Elise Amendola

“I’m a 34-year-old NBA center. I’m black. And I’m gay.”

So started the essay by active NBA player Jason Collins, the first openly gay NBA player. In fact, Collins is the first openly gay male athlete who is still active in a major American team sport. 

Aaron Jackson took inspiration from a 9-year-old kid who stood up to Westboro Baptist Church protesters.

As Mark wrote last year, Josef Miles stood in front of protesters carrying signs that read "God Hates [Gays]" with his own sign that read "God Hates No One."

Today, Jackson is following through on a project that started about six months ago when he decided to buy a house across the street from the infamous church in Topeka, Kan.

Mapping The Human Brain

Feb 28, 2013
Brain scans
Flickr Photo/David Foltz

In his State of the Union address, President Obama proposed a massive scientific endeavor to map the human brain. It's a multi-billion dollar, multi-year project that's meant to do for neuroscience what the Human Genome Project did for DNA. How will scientists actually achieve it? We talk with Dr. Christof Koch from the Allen Institute for Brain Science and Dr. Patricia Kuhl from the UW Institute for Learning and Brain Science.

House Bill Would Regulate Conversion Therapy

Feb 21, 2013
Marko Liias
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

A new House bill proposed by State Representative Marko Liias would establish a panel to investigate the effects of sexual orientation conversion therapy -- also known as 'straight camp' -- for minors in Washington state. Liias is one of several openly gay legislators in Washington, and he said in a press release that conversion therapy has “no basis in science or medicine, and it is vital that we bring together the proper health experts to better understand the impacts.”

Odd pair
Flickr photo/Fixeche

Anna Muraco calls the relationships between gay men and straight women, and straight men and gay women, "intersectional friendships." By interviewing many intersectional friendships, Muraco found the stereotypical reason these relationships are formed is false and limiting in the way we view family, friendship and social norms. Muraco spoke at the University Book Store on January 16, 2013.

Phyllis Fletcher / KUOW Photo

It’s estimated that in King County, around 700 people under the age of 25 don’t have permanent housing. Among adolescents in general, LGBTQ youths are more vulnerable to health and psychological problems than heterosexual youths. Many are victims of parental physical abuse, turn to substance abuse, and have both mental and general physical health problems.

Ross Reynolds sits down with three people currently living without permanent housing to talk about what issues they have had to deal with as homeless youth.

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