LGBTQ

Alberto Pizzoli/Reuters

Argentina's Buenos Aires province passed a groundbreaking new law this week, believed to be the first of its kind worldwide.

The law requires the province fill at least 1 percent of government jobs with transgender people. The law only applies to Buenos Aires province, but USA Today reports that this sort of requirement is not in place anywhere else.

Updated at 1:39 p.m. ET

A federal judge found a Kentucky clerk at the center of the national debate over same-sex marriage in contempt of court after she defied the Supreme Court by refusing to issue marriage licenses in protest of such marriages.

Kentucky Public Radio's Ryland Barton reports that District Judge David L. Bunning ordered Kim Davis taken into custody by federal marshals "until she complies" with a court order.

Courtesy of Letibee

When 24-year-old Koki Hayashi first came out to his mom, he was a junior in college.

"I just kind of said it quickly, 'Hey, I’m gay,'" he recalls.

“Stop it. That’s disgusting,” she said, according to Hayashi. That really hurt.

Japan — unlike the US — doesn't have a Puritan history that says homosexuality is some kind of cardinal sin. And for years it wasn't uncommon to see a cross-dresser on TV giving fashion advice or a Japanese cartoon with gay characters.

You're probably at least a little bit racist and sexist and homophobic. Most of us are.

Capitol Hill rainbow crosswalk at 10th Ave & East Pike Street.
Flickr Photo/Gordon Werner (CC BY SA 2.0)

More rainbow crosswalks are coming to the hub of the Seattle gay community on Capitol Hill. That’s just one item in the mayor’s action plan to improve safety for LGBTQ people in the city. 

Eagle Scout Liam Easton-Calabria from Ballard, Seattle: 'it just made me pretty upset to learn that I wouldn’t be able to do what my dad was doing.'
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Boy Scouts and their families in the Seattle area are celebrating this week’s national decision to allow gay scout leaders. But not all local troops will be implementing the changes. 

Transgender people are not getting adequate health care, and widespread discrimination is largely to blame, according to a recent World Health Organization report. And the story is told most starkly in the high rates of HIV among transgender women worldwide.

JoAnne Keatley, one of the authors of that study, puts it plainly.

Ross Reynolds talks with Northwest News Network reporter Jessica Robinson about same sex marriage in Idaho.

Caitlyn Jenner is on a mission. Accepting the Arthur Ashe Courage Award at the ESPYs Wednesday night, she said she will be turning to advocating for transgender people.

"Trans people ... deserve your respect," she told the gathering of famous athletes.

In a video produced for the award ceremony, Jenner said she had come to a "revelation": "Out of all the things that I have done in my life, that maybe this is my calling." She added, "Maybe I can bring understanding on this subject. It's time that I do my best."

Is there such a thing as a "gay voice"? For gay filmmaker David Thorpe, the answer to that question is complicated. "There is no such thing as a fundamentally gay voice," Thorpe tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross. But, he adds, "there is a stereotype and there are men, to a greater or lesser extent, who embody that stereotype."

In his new film, Do I Sound Gay?, Thorpe searches for the origin of that stereotype and documents his own attempts to sound "less gay" by working with speech pathologist Susan Sankin.

Steven Durant, left, and Ed Malick were both married to women before coming out as gay.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

The Supreme Court ruling effectively legalizing same sex marriage nationwide has been seen as a huge victory for the lesbian, gay and transgender community.

But that doesn't mean LGBT people automatically have equal rights and protections - even in Washington state, where some equal protection laws have been on the books since 2006.

It's controlled after-school anarchy at the Christian-Carter household. Seven-year-old Chloe has rolled herself up in an exercise mat in the living room of the family's Oakland, Calif., home.

"Look I'm a burrito," Chloe shouts.

Her 4-year-old sister, Jackie, swoops in for a bite — and a hard push.

"Ow!" Chloe shouts. "Mom! Jackie pushed me!"

Gabby Turner, 19, and Eva Rozelle, 16, said they haven't experienced homophobia growing up in Seattle. In fact, they said coming out wasn't really necessary for their generation.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

On Sunday morning, ahead of Seattle Pride 2015, marchers gathered in a parking lot under the freeway. They blew balloons, lathered on sunscreen and told what Pride means to them.

Ross Reynolds speaks with Peter Nicolas, professor of law at the University of Washington, about what the Supreme Court ruling on same-sex marriage means for gay couples in Washington. Nicolas also looks at how the ruling might be challenged in states where gay marriage is banned.

Pages