Two African-American brothers shot by a white Olympia police officer in May have pleaded not guilty to assault charges.

Recreational marijuana use is legal in Washington state — but only for adults. And after the state's law was tweaked this summer, minors who break that rule risk felony charges. That's the case for three minors in Asotin County, who could now face up to five years in prison.

Students put flowers on a memorial for the shooting victims at Marysville-Pilchuck High School in October 2014.
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

The father of the shooter at Marysville-Pilchuck High School is scheduled to go on trial in a Seattle federal court next week.

Raymond Fryberg, Jr. faces charges of unlawful firearms possession. But his lawyers say any mention of how his gun was used would prejudice the jury.

Law gavel
Flickr Photo/Brian Turner (CC BY 2.0)/

Ross Reynolds talks with state Representatives Matt Manweller (R-Ellensburg) and Reuven Carlyle (D-Seattle) about a proposed initiative that would make state Supreme Court justices recuse themselves from cases involving donors who've given them more than $1,000.

A southwest Washington man has pleaded guilty to poaching bigleaf maple trees from U.S. Forest Service land. Ryan Anthony Justice entered his plea Thursday in federal court in Tacoma.

Lady Justice, law, court
Flickr Photo/Mark Treble (CC BY NC 2.0)

"I consider trial by jury as the only anchor ever yet imagined by man, by which a government can be held to the principles of its constitution." Thomas Jefferson, in a letter to Thomas Paine in 1789.

That sentiment begs the question: Would Jefferson recognize the United States justice system today?

Ninety-seven percent of criminal cases in the U.S. result in plea bargains that do not determine guilt or innocence. Only 3 percent go to trial by jury. 

Employees at Ike's Pot Shop in Seattle's Central District sell marijuana products on their opening day, Sept. 30, 2014.
KUOW Photo/Posey Gruener

David Hyde talks with Associated Press journalist Kristen Wyatt about new lawsuits aimed to take down the legal pot industry.

Foss Maritime tugs pull the Polar Pioneer past downtown Seattle on the way to Terminal 5 on Thursday, May 14, 2015.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Shell’s Polar Pioneer, briefly a resident at the Port of Seattle's Terminal 5,  is drilling for oil in the Chukchi Sea. The question is whether the rig can return to Seattle this fall -- and whether it can stay the winter. 

The Port of Seattle and Foss Maritime Co. are appealing a city decision to try to stop the rig. A city examiner is hearing arguments about what should happen next.

EA-18G Growlers from Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 132 taxi to the runway as they prepare to to depart Naval Air Facility Misawa for their home base of Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Wash.
Flickr Photo/U.S. Pacific Fleet (CC BY NC 2.0)

A federal judge has denied an injunction request from a Whidbey Island group that would have prevented Navy jets from landing at a strip near Coupeville, Washington.

The group says the noise from EA-18 Growler jet training flights is harmful.

In the spring they asked a federal judge to stop the landings until the Navy completes a new environmental assessment, which is due next year.

education kid school
Flickr Photo/jeweledlion (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Phil Talmadge, former Washington state Democratic legislator and former state justice, about the McCleary decision concerning education funding and how it's dividing government. 

Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson has won a $55,000 judgment against the backer of a Kickstarter campaign that failed to deliver. 

Guards wheel Monfort from the courtroom on Wednesday. Monfort is paralyzed from the waist down.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Closing arguments continue Thursday in the penalty phase of the trial of Christopher Monfort. Monfort ambushed two Seattle police officers in 2009, killing one of them. 

The state wants to see Monfort executed. The defense hopes Monfort gets life in prison without the possibility of parole.

Compost trash
Flickr Photo/Jason Tester Guerilla Futures (CC BY ND 2.0)

Ross Reynolds speaks with Brian Hodges, an attorney at the Pacific Legal Foundation. Hodges is suing the city of Seattle on behalf of eight Seattle residents who say inspection of their garbage to enforce food waste laws is an invasion of their privacy.

In Court, Your Face Could Determine Your Fate

Jul 17, 2015

Your face has a profound effect on the people around you. Its expression can prompt assumptions about how kind, mean or trustworthy you are. And for some people, a study finds, it could help determine their fate in court.

A jury in Colorado has found Aurora theater shooter James Holmes guilty of first-degree murder in the 2012 mass shooting that killed 12 people and injured 70 others. Holmes could now face the death penalty.

The jury of nine women and three men, who heard nearly three months of testimony in the case, deliberated for a day and a half before arriving at a decision on Thursday.

The verdict comes nearly three years to the day after the mass shooting on July 20, 2012, at the Century Aurora 16 theater.