law

Mentally ill inmates continue to languish in Washington jails despite a recent federal judge’s ruling that the practice is unconstitutional.

This undated handout photo provided by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office shows the StingRay II, manufactured by Harris Corporation, of Melbourne, Fla., a cellular site simulator used for surveillance purposes.
U.S. Patent and Trademark Office

Ross Reynolds speaks with Nate Wessler, staff attorney with the ACLU's Speech, Privacy, and Technology Project, about how a new law on the books in Washington will protect residents from a powerful surveillance devices known as Stingrays.

blind justice law court
Flickr Photo/Scott* (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman speaks with Paula Littlewood, executive director of the Washington State Bar Association, about a unique Washington program designed to provide more affordable access to legal advice.

Pharmacy prescription
Flickr Photo/Mike Mozart (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with University of Washington pharmacy professor Don Downing about a new law that changes how pharmacists will operate in Washington state and why he worked for 15 years to get it passed.

Marcie Sillman talks with Lara Zarowsky, policy director for The Innocence Project Northwest, about why she wants to reform how police departments conduct eye witness identifications.

Flickr Photo/Elvert Barnes (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to Sara Rankin, law professor at Seattle University, about the how city ordinances and laws affect the homeless in Washington cities. 

File photo of the Supreme Court.
Flickr Photo/Mark Fischer

You’re driving through another state with your same-sex spouse and have a serious accident – and a hospital won’t grant you the same visitation rights that a heterosexual couple would have.

Or you and your same-sex spouse retire in a state that doesn’t recognize your marriage, and when you apply for Social Security benefits, there’s a problem.

blind justice law court
Flickr Photo/Scott* (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to Jeffery Robinson, a Seattle criminal defense attorney about his new job as the director of the ACLU's Center For Justice. 

In this 2012 file photo, Troy Kelley, the Democratic candidate for state auditor at the time, takes questions at a debate.
Flickr Photo/Daniel Brunell (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with KUOW Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins and local attorney Bob Chadwell about the unfolding story of Washington state auditor Troy Kelley's indictment and what the legal ramifications could be.

A measure moving through the state legislature would give rape victims in Oregon more time to come forward to report an attack.

Supreme Court SCOTUS
Flickr Photo/Kjetil-Ree (CC BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks to Alexandra Gutierrez of the Alaska Public Radio Network about the decision by Alaska's attorney general to sign a letter with 15 other states advising the Supreme Court to uphold state bans on same-sex marriage. 

Flickr Photo/krupp (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Science fiction writer Isaac Asimov came up with three laws of robotics: a robot may not harm a human, a robot must obey humans and a robot must protect its own existence.

The Washington State Senate thinks even more regulating laws are necessary. On Wednesday senators voted unanimously to outlaw ticket bot computer software that buys up to 40 percent of the tickets for a concert before the public gets a stab at them.  This is only the latest effort to regulate robots and robotic software.

A federal judge in Seattle Thursday ordered the state of Washington to provide mental health evaluations to jail inmates within seven days.

Jeff Coats kidnapped David Grenier and stole his car in Tacoma, Washington on September 6, 1994. Coats was 14 years old, and was sent to adult prison. Now, Coats is a successful real estate agent who speaks on issues of imprisonment and rehabilitation.
Provided courtesy of Katherine Beckett, University of Washington

Ross Reynolds speaks with University of Washington sociology professor Katherine Beckett about the story of Jeff Coats who, along with two 17-year-old friends, robbed and kidnapped Tacoma resident David Grenier on Sept. 6, 1994. Beckett helped produce a full-length audio documentary about Coats, who she believes has rehabilitated himself.

When Online Rants Become Criminal Acts

Mar 20, 2015
Flickr Photo/Matthew (CC BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds speaks with David Green, First Amendment attorney for the Electronic Frontier Foundation, about social media rants and when online comments cross the line from hyperbole to a criminal act. 

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