Over the summer, the Texas Forensic Science Commission, which sets standards for physical evidence in state courts, came to an unsettling conclusion: There was something wrong with how state labs were analyzing DNA evidence.

It seemed the labs were using an outdated protocol for calculating the probability of DNA matches in "mixtures"; that is, crime scene samples that contain genetic material from several people. It may have affected thousands of cases going back to 1999.

KUOW reporter Ruby de Luna interviews David Whedbee about the challenges of navigating a wheelchair around bad curb cuts in Seattle.
Courtesy of Disability Rights Washington

Crossing Seattle streets can be hazardous for people with disabilities. That’s because curb cuts are either missing, broken or poorly placed.

Disability Rights Washington, an advocacy group for people with disabilities, wants to change that and has filed a class action suit against Seattle.

Disability Rights Washington announced Thursday that it will delay the filing of a lawsuit against the state of Washington on behalf of mentally disabled sex offenders on McNeil Island at the request of the state.

Another Washington state juvenile killer sentenced to serve life without parole will be set free next year. This follows a U.S. Supreme Court ruling and passage of a new Washington state law.

Employees at Ike's Pot Shop in Seattle's Central District sell marijuana products on their opening day, Sept. 30, 2014.
KUOW Photo/Posey Gruener

Ross Reynolds interviews Hal Snow, the head of cannabis practice at the law firm Garvey Schubert Barer. It’s legal to buy and sell marijuana in some states, but the legal picture is far from clear. Cannabis is still illegal under federal law, although tolerated by the attorney general as long as states follow certain rules. But that makes most bankers leery about providing financial services to marijuana businesses. Will a new president and Congress in January 2017 change the picture? 

Washington anti-tax activist Tim Eyman could face civil or even criminal sanctions for alleged campaign finance violations.

Two African-American brothers shot by a white Olympia police officer in May have pleaded not guilty to assault charges.

Recreational marijuana use is legal in Washington state — but only for adults. And after the state's law was tweaked this summer, minors who break that rule risk felony charges. That's the case for three minors in Asotin County, who could now face up to five years in prison.

Students put flowers on a memorial for the shooting victims at Marysville-Pilchuck High School in October 2014.
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

The father of the shooter at Marysville-Pilchuck High School is scheduled to go on trial in a Seattle federal court next week.

Raymond Fryberg, Jr. faces charges of unlawful firearms possession. But his lawyers say any mention of how his gun was used would prejudice the jury.

Law gavel
Flickr Photo/Brian Turner (CC BY 2.0)

Ross Reynolds talks with state Representatives Matt Manweller (R-Ellensburg) and Reuven Carlyle (D-Seattle) about a proposed initiative that would make state Supreme Court justices recuse themselves from cases involving donors who've given them more than $1,000.

A southwest Washington man has pleaded guilty to poaching bigleaf maple trees from U.S. Forest Service land. Ryan Anthony Justice entered his plea Thursday in federal court in Tacoma.

Lady Justice, law, court
Flickr Photo/Mark Treble (CC BY NC 2.0)

"I consider trial by jury as the only anchor ever yet imagined by man, by which a government can be held to the principles of its constitution." Thomas Jefferson, in a letter to Thomas Paine in 1789.

That sentiment begs the question: Would Jefferson recognize the United States justice system today?

Ninety-seven percent of criminal cases in the U.S. result in plea bargains that do not determine guilt or innocence. Only 3 percent go to trial by jury. 

Employees at Ike's Pot Shop in Seattle's Central District sell marijuana products on their opening day, Sept. 30, 2014.
KUOW Photo/Posey Gruener

David Hyde talks with Associated Press journalist Kristen Wyatt about new lawsuits aimed to take down the legal pot industry.

Foss Maritime tugs pull the Polar Pioneer past downtown Seattle on the way to Terminal 5 on Thursday, May 14, 2015.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Shell’s Polar Pioneer, briefly a resident at the Port of Seattle's Terminal 5,  is drilling for oil in the Chukchi Sea. The question is whether the rig can return to Seattle this fall -- and whether it can stay the winter. 

The Port of Seattle and Foss Maritime Co. are appealing a city decision to try to stop the rig. A city examiner is hearing arguments about what should happen next.

EA-18G Growlers from Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 132 taxi to the runway as they prepare to to depart Naval Air Facility Misawa for their home base of Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Wash.
Flickr Photo/U.S. Pacific Fleet (CC BY NC 2.0)

A federal judge has denied an injunction request from a Whidbey Island group that would have prevented Navy jets from landing at a strip near Coupeville, Washington.

The group says the noise from EA-18 Growler jet training flights is harmful.

In the spring they asked a federal judge to stop the landings until the Navy completes a new environmental assessment, which is due next year.