Las Vegas shooting | KUOW News and Information

Las Vegas shooting

In the wake of the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history, most Americans — regardless of party — favor tightening restrictions on firearms, according to a new NPR/Ipsos poll.

But significant partisan divides remain — and perhaps relatedly, they exist alongside divides in knowledge about guns in America.

Eight-in-10 Americans told the pollsters they favor bans on assault weapons, high-capacity ammunition magazines and "bump stocks," an accessory used by the Las Vegas shooter that allows a semi-automatic rifle to fire like an automatic weapon.

A week after the shooting that took 58 lives and changed many more, Las Vegas is picking up the pieces.

For the first time since the barrage of gunfire tore through the Route 91 Harvest Festival last Sunday night, some of those who attended the event can pick up belongings that were left behind as they fled for safety.

KUOW PHOTO/ Kara McDermott

This week one man killed 58 and wounded hundreds of people in Las Vegas using legal weapons — semiautomatic rifles modified with devises that make them act more like machine guns. Will this shooting change our gun laws? 

Updated at 4:50 p.m. ET

Investigators in Las Vegas are sifting through evidence they've gathered from the homes of the man who sprayed a concert crowd with gunfire. They've begun to interview his girlfriend. They've learned quite a bit about Stephen Paddock's past and preparation, but there is still no explanation for why he damaged and destroyed so many lives.

Police officers advise people to take cover near the scene of a shooting near the Mandalay Bay resort and casino on the Las Vegas Strip, Sunday, Oct. 1, 2017, in Las Vegas.
AP Photo/John Locher

In the wake of the Las Vegas attack, King County and Seattle law enforcement are considering training officers to deal with an elevated shooter situation.

Gunman Stephen Paddock killed 58 people at an outdoor music festival Sunday and wounded hundreds more.

In the wake of the horrific shooting in Las Vegas this week, the White House faced questions about whether President Trump would support stricter gun legislation.

Press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders didn't give a definite response to these questions, but her statement showed a White House hesitant to create new regulations.

In this Dec. 9, 2015, photo, a sales associate walks past semiautomatic rifles at Bullseye Sport gun shop in Riverside, Calif.
AP Photo/Jae C. Hong

There are renewed calls for gun reform in Washington state this week in the aftermath of the Las Vegas shooting in which 58 people were killed and hundreds more were injured.

Authorities say among the gunman’s weapons were bump-stocks, devices to make semi-automatic guns shoot more rapidly.


It took just over an hour.

At about 10:08 p.m. local time Sunday, the first reports of gunfire surfaced on dispatch radio for the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department. By about 11:20 p.m., law enforcement had used explosives to bust down the door of a hotel room in Mandalay Bay, where they would soon report their suspect dead, surrounded by firearms.

Updated at 5:28 p.m. ET

President Trump solemnly addressed the nation Monday morning about Sunday night's mass shooting in Las Vegas, saying Americans are "joining together in sadness, shock and grief."

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Updated at 6:09 p.m. ET

A gunman holed up in a hotel room high above the Las Vegas Strip fired down upon thousands of people attending a music festival Sunday night, in a brutal attack blamed for at least 59 deaths, a law enforcement official says. In the mass shooting and panic that ensued, 527 people were injured.