labor

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

UPDATE 12/09/13  5:30 PM PT:

Supporters of SeaTac's $15 an hour minimum wage are celebrating tonight after the initiative survived a hand recount of ballots cast in the race.

County elections officials spent a full day scrutinizing more than 6,000 ballots by hand, closely watched by observers from both sides of the issue.

The president of the St. Louis machinists union tells his hometown newspaper that he's “prepared and ready to sit down with Boeing” to discuss moving 777X production to Missouri. 

KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Fast food workers and advocates for a higher minimum wage marched from the City of SeaTac to Seattle today as a part of a national day of demonstrations.

Voters in SeaTac this fall narrowly passed a ballot measure to raise the minimum wage to $15 for some workers in transportation and hospitality businesses within city limits. Now, organizers of the march want that expanded to other areas too, and they have support beyond the workers.

The president of the machinists union in St. Louis says Boeing should build the 777X in Washington.

KUOW Photo/Jason Pagano

Marcie Sillman talks with Everett mayor Ray Stephanson about his efforts to bring Boeing and the machinist union back to the negotiation table.

The Planet Money men's T-shirt was made in Bangladesh, by workers who make about $3 a day, with overtime. The Planet Money women's T-shirt was made in Colombia, by workers who make roughly $13 a day, without overtime.

The wages in both places are remarkably low by U.S. standards. But the gap between them is huge. Workers in Colombia make more than four times what their counterparts make in Bangladesh. In our reporting, we saw that the workers in Colombia have a much higher standard of living than the workers in Bangladesh.

Wilcox Farms, where a man was buried under tons of corn on Monday when a silo gave way, was cited for six violations last summer that could have put workers in serious danger, according to inspection reports.

SeaTac Minimum Wage Earners: The Exception Or The Rule?

Nov 26, 2013
Flickr Photo/Transtator

Steve Scher asks Quoctrung Bui of NPR's Planet Money how SeaTac's (impending) $15 minimum wage fits in among national minimum wage trends.

Boeing handout.

Ross Reynolds and Steve Scher interview Huntsville, Ala., Mayor Tommy Battle and aviation reporter Daniel McCoy of the Wichita Business Journal about what their states are offering the Boeing company in exchange for the 777x.

Washington state hit a 'soft patch' in hiring and is looking at slow overall growth. That news comes from two new data points on the Washington economy out Wednesday.

From Diamond Knot Alehouse's Facebook page

David Hyde spoke with Diamond Knot Alehouse lead server Chris Pugh about how his business could be affected if Boeing moves the 777X program to another state.

Flickr Photo/West Annex News (CC-BY-NC-ND)

It’s Friday — time to talk over the week's news with KUOW's Steve Scher, The Stranger's Eli Sanders, Crosscut's Knute Berger and Joni Balter of the Seattle Times.

This week Boeing's machinists union voted against a proposed contract extension that came with a promise to build the new 777X in Washington state. Did they preserve the future of aerospace in Puget Sound or will Boeing's next move be to South Carolina or Southern California?

Challenger Kshama Sawant appears headed toward a victory over incumbent Seattle City Councilmember Richard Conlin after initially being several percentage points behind on election night. How will a socialist sit with City Hall? 

Plus, Live Wire host Luke Burbank marvels at the chutzpah of Toronto mayor Rob Ford.

Flickr Photo/Jetstar Airways

Ross Reynolds talks with Gary Chaison, professor of industrial relations at Clark University, about how the Boeing machinist vote will affect the future of labor negotiations in Washington and across the country.

KUOW Photo/Jason Pagano

In a vote that could ultimately move Boeing out of Washington state, Boeing's machinists rejected the company's proposed contract, with 67 percent of union members opposed.

KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Standing before a crowd of Boeing machinists on Thursday night, Tom Wroblewski, president of the Boeing machinists union, tore up a copy of the proposed contract and said he would try to stop it from coming to a vote.

“I know this is a piece of crap,” Wroblewski said, according to The Seattle Times.

The machinists before him were openly hostile to the eight-year deal, which would replace their health care costs and strip down their pensions.

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