kids and parenting | KUOW News and Information

kids and parenting

Remember running around the playground when you were a kid? Maybe hanging from the monkey bars or seeing who could swing the highest?

It wasn't just a mindless energy burn. Many have called play the work of childhood. Play teaches children how to make friends, make rules and navigate relationships.

But for kids whose disabilities keep them from using playgrounds, those opportunities can be lost.

Does Fewer Kids Mean Less Kid Friendly? Raising Children In Jet City

Aug 13, 2013
Flickr Photo/Michael Hanscom

 Seattle has one of the lowest populations of children in the United States. What does it mean when a city goes from a playground for kids to a playground for the rich? Ross Reynolds talks with Ali Modarres, professor of urban geography at California State University and co-author of a new report on the Childless City. And listeners answer the questions: Do you think is a bad place to raise kids? Did you leave the city to raise your kids in Shoreline or Bellevue? 

Wind energy
Flickr Photo/Alex Abian

MLB Suspensions
Major League Baseball has handed down lengthy suspensions to more than a dozen players for using performance enhancing drugs, among them: former Seattle Mariner (and current New York Yankee) Alex Rodriguez. He was suspended for the remainder of this season and all of next season. A player in the Mariners’ minor league system was also suspended: Tacoma Rainiers catcher Jesus Montero. What do these suspensions say about the state of drug use in baseball?

Technology-Enabled Sexual Landscape
Technology has changed when and how kids are exposed to sexual activity.  Gone are the dirty magazines under the mattress.  On average, kids are exposed to full action, hardcore sexual activity by age 10.  How is this changing the behavior and expectations of teenagers?  How can you help your kids navigate a technology-enabled sexual landscape?

Climate Change And The Republican Party  
Former head of the Environmental Protection Agency and former co-chair of the Puget Sound Partnership, William Ruckelsaus explains why the Republican Party needs to take action on climate change.

The Weather and Hike of the Week
Michael Fagin suggests a hike that matches the week’s weather forecast.
 

Nancy Pearl's Young Reader Recommendations

Jul 8, 2013

If you are looking for a good book to keep young readers interested, Nancy Pearl recommended a few on Weekday with Marcie Sillman.

Nancy Pearl’s Suggestions:

“The Diary Of A Wimpy Kid,” by Jeff Kinney

“The Great Brain,” by John D. Fitzgerald

“Keeping The Castle,” by Patrice Kindl

“A Brief History Of Montmaray,” by Michelle Cooper

“Code Name Verity,” by Elizabeth Wein

US Daycares Fail To Make The Grade

Jul 1, 2013
Flickr Photo/U.S. Army

  About 8.2 million kids under five in the United States spend at least part of their week in the care of someone other than a parent. And that number is even higher in the summer. Of those child care operations, the majority are rated “fair” or “poor” quality  according to a 2007 study by the National Institute of Child Health Development.

Washington state however is one of the all-stars. The state was ranked number three in the nation for quality of child care center requirements and oversight in a 2013 study by the non-profit resource organization Child Care Aware. Ross Reynolds talks to Elizabeth Bonbright, the director of Child Care Aware of Washington, about why she says that’s still nothing to write home about.

Only Children: Lonely And Selfish?

Jun 21, 2013
Lauren Sandler's book "One and Only."

There are long held stereotypes that children who grow up without siblings are selfish, lonely and spoiled — and they stay that way their entire lives.  It is a stereotype that has existed for decades, penetrated many generations and has not only held in America but in other countries as well.

Lauren Sandler looked at the stereotypes and researched the experiences of only children while writing her book, “One and Only: The Freedom of Having Only One Child and the Joy of Being One.” Throughout her research she came across the belief held by many that you are a bad person if you are an only child and you are a bad person if you choose to have only one child. But what does that look like inside the family? Sandler tells Jeannie Yandel about what it really means to be an only child.

Seattle Police are warning parents to keep their young children within sight after a rash of apparent kidnapping attempts involving 3- and 4-year-old boys.

The latest incident happened Monday morning outside Coe Elementary School in Seattle’s Queen Anne neighborhood. Seattle Police spokeswoman Renee Witt says a woman told police she had left her 4-year-old son inside her parked car while she walked her daughter to the school.

Monica Wesolowska Discusses "Holding Silvan"

May 16, 2013
Monica Wesolowska's book "Holding Silvan."

When Monica Wesolowska’s newborn child wouldn’t stop crying, he was taken in for observation. Soon Wesolowska and her husband had to make a tough decision about their son’s life. She shares her experiences and insight with David Hyde.

The Best And Worst Advice From Mothers

May 10, 2013
Flickr Photo/Kevin Dooley

Mother’s Day is Sunday! Ross asks listeners about advice from their mothers.

Can You Defeat A Bully With Empathy?

Apr 29, 2013

Forty-nine states now have laws on bullying. Schools have policies and punishments. But Slate senior editor Emily Bazelon says there’s a risk that searching for solutions to bullying can do more harm than good.

Ross Reynolds sits down with Bazelon to talk about Washington policies and her new book, "Sticks and Stones: Defeating the Culture of Bullying and Rediscovering The Power of Character and Empathy."

How To Make Sure Your Kids Are Good With Money

Apr 23, 2013
Flickr Photo/Shana

In Washington state there are no requirements to include financial education in school curriculum. As a result, most kids graduate high school financially illiterate.

While parents often give their children an allowance to teach financial responsibility, there is little emphasis on what to do with that allowance. Should it be school’s responsibility to teach financial education? What should parents be doing?

Advergaming: The Unregulated World Of Marketing To Kids

Apr 23, 2013
Flickr Photo/Seth Werkheiser

Regulation exits for television marketing aimed at children that mixes entertainment with advertising. That regulation does not exist for advergaming, a form of online entertainment that integrates advertising into a video game format.

These advergames are often targeted to children who at their age, have difficulty differentiating between advertising and other content.

Skeptical Kid
Flickr photo/Sharyn Morrow

Don’t run with scissors! If you keep making that face, it will get stuck like that. We had to take your dog to a ranch so it could have room to run.

Did you ever hear any of those lines from your parents? A recent study published in the Journal of Psychology found that 84 percent of parents in the US lie to their children.

Ross Reynolds gathered stories from listeners and local Jeopardy champion and author, Ken Jennings. 

How Children Succeed: Paul Tough

Feb 20, 2013
Flickr Photo/Jeff Meyer

Coming up on The Conversation, February 20 at noon.

Why do some children succeed and others fail? Paul Tough went looking for the answer to that question, and in the process learned the answer is changing. He joins Ross Reynolds for a conversation about childhood success.

george ruiz / Flickr

According to a 2012 study by the CDC, Washington had the seventh highest rate of home births in the country. Overall, home births have been on the rise since 2004. But as of 2009 they still represented less than 1 percent of total births in the United States.

Dan Pearce / Flickr

According to the most recent census, there are more than 1.7 million single fathers in the US and more than 175,000 stay-at-home dads, and their numbers are on the rise. David Hyde spoke to single and stay-at-home dads to ask them what it's like: the highs, the lows, parenting styles, the trials and tribulations of combing a little girl's hair, and even the dating perks.

The Case For Not Having Kids

Feb 4, 2013
Baby v. dog
Flickr photo/Fernando Garcia

In Seattle, more people have cats than have kids. Same goes for dogs. In fact, Seattle is the second-most childless city in the US, just behind San Francisco. Deciding to have a child is a big decision; so is deciding not to. Seattle Times columnist Sharon Pian Chan recently addressed the issue in an editorial titled “Why I’m Not Having Kids.” Have you made the same decision? What conversations did you and your partner have? What reaction did you get from friends and relatives? We'll talk with Sharon Pian Chan and hear your take. Call us during the program: 206.543.5869 or write to weekday@kuow.org

Poet Suzanne Edison
Seedison.com

Poet Suzanne Edison knows the ups and downs of chronic illness too well. Her daughter has juvenile myositis, a rare autoimmune disorder. Today she reads two poems about the way her child’s illness affects her parenting: “Betrayal” and “Bloodwork.”

Associated Press

Russian President Vladimir Putin recently signed a law prohibiting US citizens from adopting Russian children. The US adopted 748 children from Russia in 2012, with roughly 8,600 adoptions from foreign countries in total. Every year, hundreds of families adopt children from places that are drastically different — socially, politically, and economically — from the United States. So our question is: How important is it to preserve the cultural identity of adopted children? Ross Reynolds takes your questions and discusses international adoption with Spring Hecht from the World Association for Children and Parents.

education kid school
Flickr Photo/jeweledlion (CC-BY-NC-ND)

By law, children in Washington state don’t have to attend school until they’re 8 years old. In every other state, besides Pennsylvania, children have to attend school when they’re younger — usually 6 or 7, sometimes even 5. Now a group of lawmakers wants to lower Washington’s compulsory age of education from 8 years old to 6 years old. The bill’s preliminary hearing is scheduled for tomorrow morning and today Ross talks to the main sponsor of the bill, Renton Democrat and state Representative Marcie Maxwell.

Poet Suzanne Edison
Seedison Designs

Learning that your child has a serious, chronic illness is like falling off a cliff, without knowing how — or if — your feet will ever find the ground again, says poet Suzanne Edison.

Travis S. / Flickr

Marijuana is now legal in Washington state and many parents are wondering how to explain this to their children. Ross Reynolds speaks with one of the proponents of Initiative 502, Alison Holcomb, as well as Roger Roffman, professor emeritus in the school of social work at the University of Washington, and chief of adolescent medicine at Seattle Children’s Hospital, Dr. Leslie Walker, about discussing marijuana legalization with children.

Parent with child
Flickr photo/Dimitris Papazimouris

KUOW has assembled advice from health care professionals and child advocates on how to manage the many emotions that may arise from tragic events, like the explosions at the Boston Marathon.

Parents tell their children a lot of things, but how much of it is actually true? Jeopardy! champ and author Ken Jennings peels back the curtain on parental warnings and advice in his new book, "Because I Said So! The Truth Behind the Myths, Tales and Warnings Every Generation Passes Down to its Kids." Join us, and wait at least 30 minutes after listening before going swimming.

Medicating Children

Dec 3, 2012
Pink Sherbet Photography / Flickr

Kids and drugs don't mix, unless you're talking about antipsychotic medication. Then they go together like peanut butter and jelly.

From 2001 to 2007, the number of preschool-age kids on such drugs increased by almost half. Between 1996 and 2005, school-age kids using anti-depressants increased even more. Experts disagree on whether we're overmedicating our youth.

“The apple never falls far from the tree,” the saying goes. But what happens when it does? Our guest today tells the stories of children whose identities are very different from their parents, such as dwarfs who are born to parents of average stature.  How do parents and children navigate these differences?  And what do these children have in common?

"How Children Succeed" With Paul Tough

Oct 22, 2012

Character, not IQ, is the most important predictor of a child's success. That's what Paul Tough argues in his new book, "How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity, and the Hidden Power of Character."


Tough uses research in neuroscience, economics and psychology to advocate a new way of thinking about children's success. He spoke at Seattle's Town Hall on September 20, 2012.

Why Have Kids?

Oct 17, 2012

Feminist author and blogger Jessica Valenti takes a critical look at motherhood in her new book, "Why Have Kids?" Valenti talks with David Hyde about the pros and cons of raising kids in the 21st century and listeners weigh in.

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