kids and parenting | KUOW News and Information

kids and parenting

Maile Pearl Bowlsbey is just over a week old and already she's helping force more change in the Senate than most seasoned lawmakers can even dream. She's doing it with the help of her mom, Illinois Democratic Sen. Tammy Duckworth.

Duckworth gave birth to Maile, her second child, on April 9, and she wants to keep her newborn nearby when she's doing her job as a senator. That would require a change in Senate rules that typically allow only senators and a handful of staff into the Senate chamber during votes.

Beezus Murphy, 13, poses for a portrait at her home on Tuesday, April 3, 2018, in Seattle.
KUOW photo/Megan Farmer

Eighth-grader Beezus Murphy has always loved Dr. Seuss.

Dr. Tara Westover, author of the new memoir "Educated," at the KUOW studios on April 2nd, 2018.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Your views on politics, your understanding of history, your personal identity: You feel pretty solid about them, right? But what if you didn't? 

Patricia Murphy for KUOW

This week Dow Constantine, the King County executive, agreed to a debate on the Seattle Channel about the new youth jail. On Friday, activist and attorney Nikkita Oliver tweeted that she wouldn’t participate without a live audience.

The Seattle School Board has announced the three finalists in the running to be the next Superintendent: Denise Juneau; Andre Spencer and Jeanice Swift.

Gregory Pleasant, 17, center, and Elijah Lewis, 18, right, raise their fists in the air before the start of March For Our Lives Seattle on Saturday, March 24, 2018, in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

It was a great awakening – thousands of people, many of them teens and preteens, marched through Seattle on Saturday morning. They joined tens of thousands more across the country calling for laws that would curb gun violence.

Reilly Donham, 18, of Mill Creek, Washington, attends the 'March for Our Lives' rally in Seattle on Saturday morning.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

We are at the 'March for Our Lives' in Seattle this morning where 50,000 students and their families are expected to rally. We will update this post as the march progresses.

When young kids get reading right, it pays off later

Mar 23, 2018
Volunteer Anthony Lee reads with Elizabeth Riff on Wednesday, January 24, 2018, at Sanislo Elementary School in West Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Mondays and Wednesdays are exciting days for Elizabeth Riff at Sanislo Elementary School in West Seattle. That's when the 6-year-old meets with a tutor to practice her reading skills.

As families around the country search for answers in the wake of school shootings in Parkland, Fla. and elsewhere, parents and children are having conversations that would've been almost unfathomable a generation ago.

Dezmond Floyd is a 10-year-old student in Houston. At StoryCorps, he and his mother, Tanai Benard, 34, talk about the active shooter drills in his fifth-grade classroom.

Three years ago, Betsy Deane's son was killed in an automobile accident. Now, the Pasco, Washington, grandmother hopes a new state law will allow her to reunite with the granddaughter she hasn’t been able to see since.

The Crab Nebula was one of the first objects that NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory examined with its sharp X-ray vision.
Flickr Photo/ NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (CC BY NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/249nNXy

As an undergrad at MIT, Emily Levesque discovered the three largest stars in the known universe. She was drawn to the project because of a long-seeded fascination with black holes.

That inspiration came from a book she read when she was eight — “A Wrinkle in Time,” which has now been released as a grand production for the big screen.

A Sony Walkman, belonging to a fictional character named Alex, holds a cassette mix tape.
GeekWire Photo/Kurt Schlosser

Let this segment take you back — WAY back.

We’re in your high school computer class. It's the 1980s: Walkmans in backpacks, satin jackets in lockers, Apple IIe computers running BASIC. Where is this nostalgic wonderland, you ask? 

High school students attend 'Hamilton' at the Paramount in Seattle, 2018.
Courtesy of STG/Christopher Nelson

What if the first live theater you ever saw was "Hamilton"?

That was the experience of many of the 2,800 students from low-income high schools across the state who got to see the hottest show in town on a field trip.


Wednesday morning, at 10 o'clock, students at schools across the country will walk out of their classrooms. The plan is for them to leave school — or at least gather in the hallway — for 17 minutes. That's one minute for each of the victims in last month's school shooting in Parkland, Fla.

The walkout has galvanized teens nationwide and raised big questions for schools about how to handle protests.

Parents: Be gardeners, not carpenters

Mar 8, 2018
Developmental psychologist Alison Gopnik
Wikimedia Photo/Kathleen King (CC BY-SA 3.0) http://bit.ly/2miDSmR

Bill Radke sits down with child psychologist Alison Gopnik, author of the new book "The Gardener and the Carpenter." Gopnik explains her problems with modern parenting and how to better face the unexpected that comes with raising a child. 

An exterior view of Green Hill School in Chehalis, Wash. on Wednesday, May 10, 2017.
KUOW Photo/Dan DeLong

Every person was born in this world with a certain purpose. Some people say you don't know your purpose until it's too late. I believe that because a lot of my brothers died under age 21, before they had a shot at life. This is the story of my life: 18 years of anger, sadness and mixed emotions.

Could you teach computer class without a computer?

For Owura Kwadwo Hottish, 33, an information and communications technology teacher in Ghana, it's his only option. At the middle school where he works, there are no computers. So using colored chalk, he painstakingly draws a version of the computer screen onto the blackboard.

Paid time off to care for a new child or a sick family member used to be a part of the Democratic Party platform. Now, Republicans are making paid family leave a legislative policy.

"Let's support working families by supporting paid family leave," President Trump urged Congress in his State of the Union address last month.

Author Shaun Scott.
Photo by Christopher Grunder


Filmmaker, author and professional millennial Shaun Scott has a bone to pick about participation trophies. They're just one of many broad brushes with which millennials are painted. But, Scott reminds us, millennials weren't the ones giving out the trophies. The parents were.

A grocery store's baby formula aisle often stocks an overwhelming number of options. Aside from different brands of pastel-hued tins and tubs, there are specialized formulas — some for spit-up reduction, gas or colic. And in the past decade or so, companies have introduced formulas meant for toddlers who are leaving bottles behind.

For much of the past half-century, children, adolescents and young adults in the U.S. have been saying they feel as though their lives are increasingly out of their control. At the same time, rates of anxiety and depression have risen steadily.

What's the fix? Feeling in control of your own destiny. Let's call it "agency."

"Agency may be the one most important factor in human happiness and well-being."

Seattle Preschool Program teacher Hien Do, center, dances with her students on Wednesday, June 28, 2017, at the ReWA Early Learning Center at Beacon, in Seattle, Washington.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

When former Seattle Mayor Ed Murray pitched his $81 million subsidized preschool program to voters in 2014, this was his promise: high-quality, affordable early learning that would help bridge the opportunity gap between rich and poor, black and white.

When author Judy Blume first broached topics like puberty and adolescent sexuality in her writing, it was long before those questions could be asked in a quick Google search.

Yet for those who read her now, her tales of adolescence remain modern – so much so that many of her young readers are surprised to learn Blume's books aren't brand new.

"They don't know that I wrote them generations ago. They think I wrote them yesterday for them, for the most part," Blume, who turns 80 on Monday, tells NPR's Rachel Martin.

Flickr Photo/Emory Maiden (CC-BY-NC-2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/avtfVU

Kim Malcolm talks with Northshore School District Superintendent Dr. Michelle Reid about her district's new approach to assessing students for giftedness. In January, the district implemented a universal screening process for its Highly Capable program.

Four months after having her second baby, Jessica Porten started feeling really irritable. Little things would annoy her, like her glider chair.

"It had started to squeak," she says. "And so when I'm sitting there rocking the baby and it's squeaking, I would just get so angry at that stupid chair."

Today on The Record we're looking at the #MeToo and Time's Up movements here in Washington state. How did we get here and what we can do next?

At the start of the new year, parents may encourage their teens to detox from social media, increase exercise, or begin a volunteer project. While kids may bristle at the thought of posting fewer selfies, surveys indicate 55 percent of adolescents enjoy volunteering. And according to a recent study, when it comes to helping others, teens may benefit psychologically from spending time helping strangers.

Stephan Blanford, former Seattle School Board member
KUOW photo/Megan Farmer

Stephan Blanford was the only black person on the Seattle School Board. He decided not to run again this year.

At the end of 2017, KUOW's Race and Equity Team asked him what pressing problem he saw in the city's schools. His answer: 4,000 homeless students.

A pair of underwear sold by Tiger Underwear, a Seattle-area company that has come under scrutiny for marketing images of boys wearing the underwear.
KUOW Photos/Megan Farmer

The story of how a Washington state company used boys in underwear to draw customers and the man with a secret past who tried to stop them.

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