kids

Somehow we're squeezing 16 people into our apartment for Thanksgiving this year, with relatives ranging in age from my 30-year-old nephew to my 90-year-old mother. I love them all, but in a way the one I know best is the middle-aged man across the table whose blue eyes look just like mine: my younger brother Paul.

The Perils Of Helicopter Parenting On Halloween

Oct 30, 2014
Flickr Photo/Jim Loter (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Peter Gray, research professor at Boston College, about how allowing children freedom while trick-or-treating helps them mature. Gray is the author of "Free to Learn: Why Unleashing the Instinct to Play Will Make Our Children Happier, More Self-Reliant, and Better Students for Life." 

What Poverty Can Do To A Baby's Brain

Oct 12, 2014
Courtesy of Neighborcare Health

“Myth or fact? Smoking anywhere around the baby can increase the risk of infant death.”

A half dozen pregnant women at the Columbia Public Health Center in South Seattle take turns reading statements about infant care and discussing whether they agree with the claims.

Courtesy of Highline Public Schools

In a modern kindergarten class, you rarely see one lesson underway at once.

At Bow Lake Elementary in SeaTac, these new kindergarteners are studying reading – and social skills – and how to work as a group.

PoorStart
KUOW Photo/Nick Danielson

Last year, Velma Chaney and her fiancé moved to Seattle from Mississippi with their three young children in search of a stronger job market. Her sister and nephew came too.

KUOW Photo/Ann Dornfeld

  On a sunny afternoon, 18-year-old Margaret Rim bounces her infant son on her knee in an empty classroom at South Lake High School.

A public health nurse, Emma Spohn, sits down next to her.

PoorStart
KUOW Photo/Nick Danielson

Preschool can look like fun and games.

But high-quality preschools use play to teach children the academic, social and developmental skills that they’ll need for kindergarten.

Flickr Photo/Mara (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Kirsten Johansen, senior director of clinical operations at Planned Parenthood of the Great Northwest, about today's recommendation from the American Academy of Pediatrics that teenage girls who have sex should use intrauterine devices or hormonal implants.

Opening arguments began today in the trial of 12 Atlanta educators charged in an alleged cheating conspiracy that came to light in 2009.

Prosecutors claim there was widespread cheating on state tests throughout the city's public schools, affecting thousands of students.

The case has brought national attention to the issue, raising questions about whether the pressures to improve scores have driven a few educators to fudge the numbers, but also about broader consequences.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This next item will be especially painful for Gen X-ers and even some Millennials. Saturday morning cartoons are officially a thing of the past.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "LOONEY TUNES")

People are lining up to buy legal marijuana in Washington state. Now the question is how to convince kids not to touch the stuff.

Depression is common in teenagers, with 11 percent being diagnosed by age 18, and many more having depressive symptoms. Social and academic stress can trigger depression, and rates of depression tend to peak in adolescence around the age of 16.

It doesn't help that stressed-out teens often fall into hopelessness, says David Yeager, an assistant professor of psychology at the University of Texas at Austin. "When kids have hard things happen to them, they think it'll be like that way into the future."

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Dr. Danielle Zerr, head of pediatric infectious diseases at Seattle Children’s Hospital, about how to recognize and prevent enterovirus D68, a rare and potentially severe respiratory virus.

Marcie Sillman talks with KUOW's Ruby DeLuna about the spread of enterovirus D68 in King County.

How To Make The Most Of Your 10 Minutes With Teacher

Sep 18, 2014

So you finally get the chance to meet one on one with your child's teacher — now what?

Like a good Boy Scout, be prepared: Educators agree that doing your homework before a parent-teacher conference can make a big difference.

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