kids

RadioActive's Guide To Making Friends In New Places

Feb 26, 2015
Kendra Hanna recruiting members for the Kendra Needs Friends Club at the University of Washington
KUOW Photo/Iman Mohamed

February is known as a month to focus on love and romance, but in this month's podcast, we focus on the people you lean on year round: your friends! We hear what friendship means to preschoolers and retired people and a timeless story of teenage adventure. 

Plus, you don't want to miss our story about one girl's unusual attempt to make friends in a new place.

RadioActive is KUOW's program for high school students. Listen to RadioActive stories, subscribe to the RadioActive podcast and stay in touch on Facebook and Twitter.

Dr. Stephen Tilles, the principle investigator for the peanut patch study in Seattle, with David Baty and his son Spencer, who suffers from a peanut allergy.
KUOW Photo/Amina al-Sadi

David Baty can remember the first time his son Spencer, then three years old, ate peanuts. He took the peanuts his dad gave him, and then he asked his dad for an ice pack. Spencer put it on his tongue as his cheeks started to get red.

Washington is under court order to keep foster youth from running away. So the state now has a team of “locators”--social workers whose job it is to find runaways and bring them back.

Rural Thurston County, Washington, is the kind of place people move to for a little elbow room. But if you’re a teenager from the suburbs, life can be less than exciting.

PHOTOS: Amazing Sculptures Made By A Student Who 'Didn't Know What She Was Doing'

Jan 29, 2015
Courtesy of Amal Ahmed

What makes an artist? A high school art student inadvertently stumbled upon a technique to make ridiculously cool, award-winning sculptures -- using something you have lying around the house. Listen in to learn how. 

Plus, a 15-year-old sculptor ponders the dilemma between making art for himself and making the Disney princesses his classmates want to buy. 

Flickr Photo/Barnaby Wasson (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Tonight on KUOW Spotlight, we present the latest episode of Reveal.

Part 1: The Murkiness Of American Day Care Reports

State inspection reports of day care providers are public record, but accessing them is still a problem for many parents. Washington state posts records online, but more than a dozen states don’t.

Cigarette tobacco smoke
Flickr photo/Ta Duc (Cc-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with anti-smoking advocate Vince Willmore about the public health benefits of raising the tobacco purchase age from 18 to 21. Willmore is vice president of communications for the Campaign For Tobacco Free Kids

When the children's television show Sesame Street first hit the air in 1969, many were deeply skeptical that you could use TV to introduce very young children to the basics of reading and math. But the experiment proved to be a remarkable success; Sesame Street has reached several generations of toddlers with its combination of educational content and pure entertainment. And now, Sesame Workshop is using new technology to reach the next generation.

Santa Is Magic And Can Be Any Race You Imagine

Dec 23, 2014
An Artherton Elementary School student sings for a Make-A-Wish child for National Believe Day at on Friday, Dec. 12, 2014, in Houston.
AP Photo/Aaron M. Sprecher

Ross Reynolds talks with Debra Sullivan, president of the Seattle chapter of the Black Child Development Institute, about why having multiracial Santa Clauses is good for children.

Somehow we're squeezing 16 people into our apartment for Thanksgiving this year, with relatives ranging in age from my 30-year-old nephew to my 90-year-old mother. I love them all, but in a way the one I know best is the middle-aged man across the table whose blue eyes look just like mine: my younger brother Paul.

The Perils Of Helicopter Parenting On Halloween

Oct 30, 2014
Flickr Photo/Jim Loter (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Peter Gray, research professor at Boston College, about how allowing children freedom while trick-or-treating helps them mature. Gray is the author of "Free to Learn: Why Unleashing the Instinct to Play Will Make Our Children Happier, More Self-Reliant, and Better Students for Life." 

What Poverty Can Do To A Baby's Brain

Oct 12, 2014
Courtesy of Neighborcare Health

“Myth or fact? Smoking anywhere around the baby can increase the risk of infant death.”

A half dozen pregnant women at the Columbia Public Health Center in South Seattle take turns reading statements about infant care and discussing whether they agree with the claims.

Courtesy of Highline Public Schools

In a modern kindergarten class, you rarely see one lesson underway at once.

At Bow Lake Elementary in SeaTac, these new kindergarteners are studying reading – and social skills – and how to work as a group.

PoorStart
KUOW Photo/Nick Danielson

Last year, Velma Chaney and her fiancé moved to Seattle from Mississippi with their three young children in search of a stronger job market. Her sister and nephew came too.

KUOW Photo/Ann Dornfeld

  On a sunny afternoon, 18-year-old Margaret Rim bounces her infant son on her knee in an empty classroom at South Lake High School.

A public health nurse, Emma Spohn, sits down next to her.

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