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Islam

Eat With Muslims co-founders Fathia Absie and Ilays Aden
KUOW Photo/Andy Hurst

Fathia Absie wants you to come to dinner. The Somali-American filmmaker and writer is co-founder of a Seattle-based project called Eat With Muslims, where Muslim families host dinners for people of all faiths and cultures.

On March 4, about 25 people gathered in the community space of a Belltown apartment building. The dinner was hosted by Absie and co-founder Ilays Aden. The mood was light and fun — like a dinner party.

Guests gathered to talk, but it wasn't a question-and-answer style event. Instead they answered questions as a group, like, "What's the most beautiful thing in the world?" and "What's the first thing that comes to mind when you think of Muslims?" 

When is a guest list more than a guest list? When politicians bring a plus-one to a presidential address before a joint session of Congress.

Each member of Congress can invite a guest to tonight's speech, and many members will use the occasion to send a pointed political message to President Trump and the public about the issues that matter to them.

Jasmin Samy is th civil rights manager at CAIR-Washington State, a chapter of America's largest Muslim civil liberties and advocacy organization. She says it's often difficult to get people to speak up when they think they're being discriminated against.
KUOW Photo/Patricia Murphy

When people of color try to rent housing in Seattle, they’re treated differently from white people.

The Washington state Capitol in Olympia.
Flickr Photo/amishrobot (CC-BY-NC-ND)/https://flic.kr/p/4PxvK4

Kim Malcolm talks with Washington state Senator Joe Fain (R-Auburn) about why he's co-sponsoring a bill that would prohibit the state from sharing information about someone's religious affiliation with the federal government.

Days after fire destroyed the Victoria Islamic Center in Victoria, Texas, donations to rebuild the mosque have passed $1 million. And that's only one part of the support the mosque has received: Four churches and a synagogue say Muslims are welcome to hold services in their buildings.

Updated at 1:30 p.m. ET

Police in Quebec City have arrested a suspect following a shooting at a mosque there that left six people dead and wounded eight others Sunday night. After initially saying they had two suspects in custody, police said Monday that they determined one of the men was instead a witness.

According to Canadian authorities, a gunman opened fire inside the Quebec City Islamic Cultural Centre around 8 p.m. ET, as about 40 people were gathered for evening prayers.

Gordon Wilson sits next to Tanvir Rahman at the KUOW Studios.
KUOW PHOTO/ISOLDE RAFTERY

A couple of weeks ago, a fire destroyed a Bellevue mosque. So their neighbors stepped up.

Members of the Mormon Church next door offered to share their building to give their Muslim neighbors a place to pray.

Aneelah Afzali speaking at Womxn March Seattle in Judkins Park
Courtesy of Jack Storms

Bill Radke talks to Aneelah Afzali, executive director of MAPS-AMEN (American Muslim Empowerment Program), about how marchers at Saturday's Womxn March can continue to stay politically and socially involved. Afzali was one of the speakers at the march in Seattle. She has provided an action sheet for those interested in combating Islamophobia

A fire on Saturday morning burned down a large part of the Islamic Center of the Eastside, a mosque in Bellevue.
Bellevue Fire Department

Updated 8:42 p.m.

A fire burned down most of a mosque in Bellevue early on Saturday morning, just one day after a man was charged with a hate crime for threatening members of that mosque in October.

There were no injuries.

The Muslim Association of Puget Sound, which is the largest mosque in the Puget Sound area, received a threat after the Orlando shooting on Sunday, June 12.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Police chiefs from six cities on the Eastside met with community members Tuesday night.

They held a safety forum at the Muslim Association of Puget Sound (MAPS), the largest mosque in the Northwest, to address concerns in the local Muslim and immigrant communities.

Hand prints at the base of the new sign outside the Muslim Association of Puget Sound
KUOW Photo/Kate Walters

The largest mosque in the Northwest put up an unexpected sign on Friday: Not a promotional banner, but a response to what the community calls an act of hate.

Just a couple of weeks ago, Mahmood Khadeer arrived at the Muslim Association of Puget Sound to see their granite sign cracked and damaged. It had been vandalized overnight.

To Donald Trump, one of President Obama's major failings was his refusal to identify "radical Islam" specifically as America's top adversary.

"Anyone who cannot name our enemy is not fit to lead this country," Trump told a crowd in Ohio in August. "Anyone who cannot condemn the hatred, oppression and violence of radical Islam lacks the moral clarity to serve as our president."

Washington Democratic Congresswoman Suzan DelBene
Flickr Photo/Ronald Woan (CC by NC 2.0) / https://flic.kr/p/qihx7g

U.S. Representative Suzan DelBene (D-Wash.) is proposing legislation that would prohibit the federal government from creating a registry of Muslim Americans.

President-elect Donald Trump voiced support for the idea during the campaign, saying it could help guard against domestic terrorism. And the notion has picked up steam recently after a supporter for Trump suggested that such a registry would be legal.

DelBene sees it differently, and tells KUOW that the idea is disturbing.

Flickr Photo/WarzauWynn (CC BY-NC 2.0) http://bit.ly/2e4FXO7

A little girl went home in tears recently: She had been called "a Trump" at her school in Seattle.

A first-grade boy, the son of a KUOW employee, asked his mother if his Muslim classmates would have to move away if Donald Trump, the Republican presidential nominee, were elected.


UW student Varisha Khan at the Democratic National Convention in July
KUOW PHOTO/David Hyde

Donald Trump has replaced his earlier call for a total ban on Muslims entering the U.S.

Now he demands ideological tests on immigrants. “I call it extreme, extreme vetting,” Trump said in a speech Monday in Ohio.


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