Internet | KUOW News and Information

Internet

Listeners Reflect As World Wide Web Turns 25

Mar 12, 2014
Flickr Photo/Will Clayton (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman and Steve Scher take calls from listeners as they recount their early Internet memories in celebration of the World Wide Web's 25th birthday.

Flickr Photo/Bogdan Zaharie (CC BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Doug Shadel, fraud expert and director of AARP Washington, about whom con artists are targeting and how to avoid falling victim to Internet scams.

Life Without Reliable Internet Access

Mar 11, 2014
A previous attempt at providing broadband service through a public-private partnership fell apart in 2013.
Flickr Photo/Steve Rhode (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Steve McCullough, superintendent of Curlew School District, about the lack of adequate Internet access in the small, northeastern Washington town.

About 200 students attend the school, which houses the classrooms from preschool through high school. McCullough also serves as the school's principal. The district is currently the only place with the fastest and most reliable Internet access in town.

Flickr Photo/Morten Wulff (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Frieda Ray from Washington State Broadband Office about Internet access and why her office wants every Washingtonian to go online.

Janet Abbate's book "Inventing the Internet."

Steve Scher talks with Janet Abbate, associate professor of Science and Technology In Society at Virginia Tech, about the history and early users of the Internet. Abbate is also the author of, "Inventing the Internet."

KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

David Hyde talks with author danah boyd (who prefers to write her name in lowercase) about her book "It's Complicated: The Social Lives of Networked Teens" and the misconceptions of online dangers.

Flickr Photo/Ian Britton (CC BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Maggie Reardon, senior writer for CNET News, about the Federal Communications Commission's decision to forgo an appeal of the court ruling that threw out net neutrality rules. The FCC has announced it will rewrite the existing rules instead.

Flickr Photo/Mr. T in DC (CC BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde talks with Bill Schrier, City of Seattle's former chief technology officer, about the $45 billion merger of Comcast and Time Warner Cable.

(We put a new top on this story at 9:25 a.m. ET and added an update at 10:15 a.m. ET.)

As NPR's David Folkenflik pointed out earlier today, Comcast's proposed $45 billion purchase of fellow cable company Time Warner will receive some scrutiny from federal officials. Here's some more about that part of the story:

Politico writes that:

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode The End Of Privacy.

About Hasan Elahi's TED Talk

When Hasan Elahi's name was mistakenly added to the U.S. government's watch list, he fought the assault on his privacy by turning his life inside-out for the world to see.

About Hasan Elahi

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode The End Of Privacy.

About Mikko Hyppönen's TED Talk

Virtually every international Internet user is being watched, says hacker and cyber security expert Mikko Hyppönen. He calls for digital privacy in the age of government surveillance.

About Mikko Hyppönen

Flickr Photo/Matthew (CC BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with activist Charlotte Laws about her daughter's experience as a revenge porn victim.

Flickr Photo/Jonathan Moreau (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with CNET News senior writer Maggie Reardon about Tuesday's federal appeals court decision that says Internet service providers aren't required to treat all Internet traffic equally.

Courtesy of CondoInternet

Network engineer Lee Kirk was working for Comcast when a friend of his tried to hire him away to Gigabit Squared Seattle for a partnership between the company and the city to improve Internet service in the area.

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Finally today, we want to take a look at the world of Internet media. Now we often hear that the Internet is the brave new world where things like race and gender don't matter. Everybody can be who they want to be and have equal access and equal say. But we also know that there is an ugly side to the Internet, and that's something you may have experienced yourself, particularly if you are a girl or a woman.

KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

One of Mayor Mike McGinn’s campaign promises when he ran in 2009 was to extend high-speed Internet in Seattle. Now the city is partnering with  Gigabit Squared to extend high-speed service that, while initially limited to a few neighborhoods, could compete favorably with Comcast.

Biographies In The Age Of Email

Aug 7, 2013
Flickr Photo/pennstatenews

For centuries, biographers relied on handwritten letters to bring historical figures to life, from Ghandi to Catherine The Great. But email, texts and Outlook have changed how historians work. For example, we know from emails how Microsoft executives reacted to Apple’s early success with iTunes: “We were smoked.”

Full list of stories from KUOW Presents, August 7:

KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

When Mike McGinn ran for mayor in 2009, he campaigned on the promise of high-speed internet for all of Seattle. But once elected, he struggled to implement anything close to that. Four years later McGinn still presides over a city of internet haves and have-nots.

Jaron Lanier Asks: Who Owns The Future?

Jul 12, 2013
Jaron Lanier's book "Who Owns the Future?"

Jaron Lanier is a pioneer in virtual reality and the Internet. But in recent years he’s become more and more skeptical of the promises of the Web.  Ross Reynolds talks to Jaron Lanier about his new book, "Who Owns the Future."

This program originally aired May 31, 2013.

Fresh reports about the massive amount of electronic data that the nation's spy agencies are collecting "raise profound questions about privacy" because of what they say about how such information will be collected in the future, NPR's Dina Temple-Raston said Friday on Morning Edition.

Flickr Photo/g4ll4is

You are under surveillance when you go online. The information gatherers include the government, advertising companies and brokers who sell your data. Christopher Soghoian, chief technologist for the national ACLU, explains that the constantly updating world of technology has  also changed the government's ability to spy Internet communications and mobile telephones.  

Berkman Center for Internet & Society

The Mechanical Turk was a fake chess playing robot that fooled Napoleon and Benjamin Franklin. Today the Mechanical Turk is a service Amazon provides, linking workers with people who need tasks done. Some pay as little as a penny. Critics call Mechanical Turk a digital sweatshop. Ross Reynolds talks with Jonathan Zittrain, co-director of the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard Law School, about working for points, Mechanical Turk and artificial-artificial intelligence.

Seattle is launching a pilot project to bring ultra high-speed broadband service the city. The city is working with the University of Washington and the tech company, Gigabit Squared, to launch the new service.

There will be 12 “demonstration fiber projects” in neighborhoods around the city. Ross Reynolds talks with Ed Lazowska, who holds the Bill & Melinda Gates Chair in computer science and engineering at the UW, about the pilot program.

OLYMPIA, Wash. – Cyber Monday was expected to generate $1.5 billion in internet sales nationwide. That’s great for on-line retailers, but not so good for tax coffers in states like Washington and Idaho. That’s because many cyber retailers still don’t collect sales tax. And Congress is unlikely to close that loophole anytime soon.

Pages