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international trade

Rep. Dave Reichert, R-Wash., speaks with the media after testifying before the Senate Law and Justice Committee about Green River serial killer Gary Ridgway on Friday, Nov. 20, 2015, in Olympia, Wash.
AP Photo/Rachel La Corte

Kim Malcolm talks with U.S. Rep Dave Reichert about why he's opposed to President Trump's tariffs on steel and aluminum. The tariffs affect imports from the European Union, Canada and Mexico.

Apples at the Olympia Farmers Market.
Flickr Photo/WSDA (CC BY-NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/ZsGd1C

U.S. tariffs on steel and aluminum went into effect Friday for Canada, the European Union and Mexico. That decision by the Trump Administration could now hurt one of Washington state's signature exports: apples. 


Boeing’s Shared Services Group (SSG) is set to move to the southwest state by 2020.
Flickr Photo/Chuck Taylor (CC BY-NC-ND)/https://flic.kr/p/7C1E9w

Bill Radke talks to Andrew McIntosh, aerospace reporter for The Puget Sound Business Journal, about the effect China's new tariffs will have on Boeing and the Puget Sound area's aerospace community. 

Washington is the top cherry producing state in the country.
Flickr Photo/beautifulcataya (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/6KiQQK

New tariffs on exports to China could have a big impact on Washington state. Tariffs went into effect Monday on 128 American products, including fruit, pork and metal pipes, in retaliation for proposed U.S. tariffs on Chinese steel and aluminum.


Cranes at the Port of Seattle
KUOW photo/Gil Aegerter

The ships, trains and trucks that haul cargo around Puget Sound are pumping out less of the soot, sulfur dioxide and other things you don’t want to breathe.

Air pollution from the ports of Seattle and Tacoma has dropped over the past decade, according to long-term monitoring released by the ports Thursday.

Apples at the Olympia Farmers Market.
Flickr Photo/WSDA (CC BY-NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/ZsGd1C

Last week, President Trump slapped tariffs on imports of aluminum and steel. As the most trade-dependent state in the country, what's the potential impact of a trade war on Washington?

Kim Malcolm sat down with Debra Glassman, senior lecturer in business economics at the University of Washington to discuss.

Amazon employee Andrea Neri stacks boxes in the back of a delivery truck on the ship dock at an Amazon fulfillment center on Friday, November 3, 2017, in Kent.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Seattle's impact on the climate in recent years could be a lot worse than the city acknowledges.

A new report from C40, a global coalition of large cities including Seattle, says the cities' greenhouse gas emissions are 60 percent higher than previously reported.

President Trump's promise to impose hefty tariffs on U.S. imports of steel and aluminum sent markets around the globe into a tailspin and prompted anger and threats of retaliation from major U.S. trading partners, raising the specter of a full-fledged trade war.

Washington DNR

The Canadian owner of an Atlantic salmon farm that collapsed last summer near Anacortes vows to use the North American Free Trade Agreement to save its fish farms in Puget Sound. New Brunswick, Canada-based Cooke Aquaculture says it will pursue mandatory arbitration under NAFTA if the Washington legislature tries to phase out Atlantic salmon farming.

Washington recyclers are worried they could soon have no place to send your discarded paper and plastics. That’s because China has decided the U.S. is letting food and garbage contaminate too much of its unwanted milk jugs and other recyclables.

China is the biggest buyer of recyclable plastic, paper and metal from the U.S. Starting next year, China will no longer take our recyclables. They say those materials are coming over with food scraps or types of plastic that can’t be recycled.

More than 1,500 dairy cows embarked on a long voyage Friday from the Pacific Northwest to Vietnam. 

The Trump administration announced this week it would levy up to 24 percent tariffs on Canadian softwood. It’s the latest chapter in an ongoing dispute between the two countries.

USA flag, China flag
Flickr Photo/USDA (CC BY 2.0)

Bill Radke talks to Gary Locke, former Washington State Governor and Ambassador to China about the relationship between the U.S. and China and what China means to the Pacific Northwest. 

In a surprising move, China's commerce ministry has announced that the country would be suspending its coal imports from North Korea. China released a statement Saturday saying that the freeze in imports will begin Sunday and will be in place through the end of the year.

Canada Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.
Flickr Photo/John McCallum (CC BY ND 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1QPN3Sh

Bill Radke talks to Stephen Quinn, the host of CBC radio's On The Coast about the news out of Canada this week. They discuss Prime Minister Trudeau's trip to the U.S., Canada's trade deal with Europe and  refugees crossing the Canadian border. 

Canada flag American flag
Flickr Photo/Bruno Casonato (CC-BY-NC-ND)/https://flic.kr/p/c1MdB

Bill Radke talks to Vaughn Palmer, columnist for the Vancouver Sun, about the meeting between Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and President Donald Trump. 

Gary Locke is former U.S. ambassador to China and former Governor of Washington State
KUOW Photos / David Hyde

Gary Locke worries the Trump administration is lurching toward a twofold disaster in its China policy.

But he's also hopeful that disaster can be avoided.

Brian Wahlberg gives daughter Luciena a good view of the proceedings as the crowd sings at Cal Anderson Park in Seattle.
KUOW photo/Gil Aegerter

In the liberal bastion that is Seattle, the response to the election was acute. People cried openly on buses and in cafes. Some took time off work to mourn in bed. It wasn't that their candidate had lost, we heard again and again, it was that they feared for the future.

Canada flag American flag
Flickr Photo/Bruno Casonato (CC-BY-NC-ND)/https://flic.kr/p/c1MdB

Bill Radke speaks with Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer about a new trade deal between Canada and the European Union, and about the U.S. presidential elections.

Sen. Bernie Sanders went out of his way Sunday to find praise for the Democratic party's platform drafting committee, but there is one major sticking point: The Trans-Pacific Partnership.

Sanders wants the final platform to unequivocally oppose the free-trade deal that was negotiated by the Obama administration, saying it "threatens our democracy" in an op-ed published in The Philadelphia Inquirer on Sunday.

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee and Japanese Ambassador to the U.S. Kenichiro Sasae signed a Memorandum of Cooperation Tuesday to strengthen trade between the Evergreen State and Japan.

For small businesses in Washington state, the Export-Import Bank has been crucial when they do business overseas. But the credit agency’s ability to help them is at risk: Its federal charter has expired and renewal legislation has bogged down in Congress.

Yakama Nation and Lummi Nation tribal members protest in May 2014 against the proposed coal export facility in Boardman, Ore. A Pacific Rim trade agreement raises questions about whether investors could challenge state decisions to stop such facilities.
COURTNEY FLATT, NWPR/EARTHFIX

After more than five years of negotiations and much secrecy, the Obama Administration released the full text of a controversial Pacific Rim trade deal Thursday. The Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement streamlines business between 12 Asia-Pacific countries, including the United States.

President Barack Obama and U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack Tuesday hailed a pending trade deal called the Trans-Pacific Partnership. The deal would span 12 countries in the Asia Pacific region including Canada and Mexico.

Even though President Obama has not yet released details of the Trans-Pacific Partnership announced Monday, supporters and opponents are making their voices heard — at full volume.

Business leaders and interest groups hope their impassioned pleas will sway Congress, which must vote on the proposed deal next year.

This is what the cheers sounded like:

Software giant Microsoft had several chances Wednesday to impress Chinese leaders with the company's vision of a "free and open" Internet.

Washington’s second largest industry, agriculture, is looking for a place at the negotiation table Tuesday with Chinese President Xi Jinping.

This post was updated at 1 p.m. ET

Senate leaders were all smiles Wednesday after they broke a 24-hour impasse and announced they had reached a deal on how to move forward on a fast-track trade negotiating bill. That legislation would give the president expedited authority to enter into a trade agreement with Pacific Rim countries, otherwise known as the Trans-Pacific Partnership, or TPP.

But how senators will vote on this bill depends largely on how they feel about TPP. And there's one problem.

If you think trade deals are just about business, think again. They can also have a sweeping effect on how people eat. Take all those avocados, watermelon and cervezas from Mexico we now consume, and the meat and feed corn for livestock we send there in exchange.

A summit with leaders of the member states of the Trans-Pacific Strategic Economic Partnership Agreement in 2010.
Wikipedia Photo

Marcie Sillman talks with Tacoma Mayor Marilyn Strickland about why she supports the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

Then, Ross Reynolds talks with Seattle City Councilmember Mike O'Brien about why he's raising concerns about the TPP.

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