India

Social Security
12:40 am
Mon April 14, 2014

A Gold Obsession Pays Dividends For Indian Women

The R.C. Jewelry Store in New Delhi. Indian women have always treasured gold for its beauty and for providing a measure of social security. Today it is also being used to give them a larger say in the family's finances.
Julie McCarthy NPR

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 4:24 pm

It's indestructible. It's fungible. It's beautiful. And for Indians, gold – whether it's 18-, 22- or 24-carat — is semi-sacred.

The late distinguished Indian economist I.G. Patel observed, "In prosperity as in the hour of need, the thoughts of most Indians turn to gold."

No marriage takes place without gold ornaments presented to the bride. Even the poorest Indian outfits girls in the family with a simple nose ring of gold.

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Microsoft's New CEO
9:29 am
Wed February 5, 2014

An Immigrant Success Story In Nadella's Rise

Satya Nadella is Microsoft's third chief executive.
Courtesy of Microsoft

Microsoft is celebrating a new leader: Satya Nadella is the company's third chief executive. Nadella likes cricket, and he quoted Oscar Wilde in his email to employees Tuesday. And for Seattle's Indian community, his appointment to the top job means a lot.

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India
9:33 am
Wed January 15, 2014

A Burned Baby: The Night That Changed Sister Kurien's Mission

Maher was established to help women and children from impoverished or abusive situations find a new home.
Credit From Maher's Facebook page.

Gaus Said was 6 and working as a mechanic in India when a social worker spotted him and connected him with Sister Lucy Kurien.

“Didi told me, 'You want to go to school?'” he said, using the affectionate name for an older sister in India. “And I was very happy. And I came to Maher. Didi took me with her that night.” Fourteen years later, Said said that night changed his life.

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11:21 am
Tue October 29, 2013

Silicon Valley Gets Linguistic Enlightenment From India

Lead in text: 
A reporter visits a pre-Diwali festival in Silicon Valley to explore the influence of Indian culture on the language used in high tech start ups.
Diwali, the Hindu festival of lights, will be celebrated around the world on November 3. In Silicon Valley, where Indian engineers make up one third of the tech workforce and have founded many successful startups, Diwali is an integral part of the culture and celebrations start early.
Read More: http://pri.org