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immigration

South Lake Union neighborhood, home to many Seattle tech companies
Flickr Photo/Ted Eytan (CC BY-SA-2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/agMkfy

Kim Malcolm talks with Puget Sound Business Journal reporter Ashley Stewart about Tuesday's immigration inspection of the Redmond cloud company Sysgain. Some lawyers are worried that immigration raids of tech firms will become more common under the Trump administration.

week in review mcginn balter mckenna radke
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Is it a big deal for a member of Congress to skip a town hall with angry voters? Will the Trump Administration go after Washington state's legal marijuana business? Should Seattle tax soda and other sugary drinks? And is America's national pasttime too slow and boring?

In the cavernous basement of St. Thomas Aquinas community center in South Philadelphia, a mock immigration raid is underway.

As one woman yells "Help! Help!" — pretending to be taken by federal immigration officers — volunteers being trained to disrupt a raid begin singing and sit down as one, blocking the officers' path.

KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Braced for more troubling news, immigrants around the country nervously await version two of President Trump’s travel ban. The revised executive order is expected next week.

Farm in Skagit Valley, WA
Flickr Photo/liquid crash (CC BY-SA-2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/pkebdP

As the Trump administration rolls out new rules on immigration enforcement this week, a bipartisan coalition of business leaders and mayors has launched a new data project that highlights the economic impact of immigrants in the United States.

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee signed an executive order Thursday in response to President Donald Trump’s crackdown on undocumented immigrants. The Democrat said the state will not participate in “mean-spirited policies” on immigration.

The proposed border wall between the U.S. and Mexico would run right through Native lands, and tribal leaders in the region say it would desecrate sacred sites.

"Over my dead body will we build a wall," says Verlon Jose, vice chairman of the Tohono O'odham Nation. "It's like me going into your home and saying 'You know what? I believe in order to protect your house we need some adjusting.' And you're going to say, 'Wait a minute, who are you to come into my house and tell me how to protect my home?' " he says.

The Department of Homeland Security this week released further details on the Trump administration’s immigration policy. It calls on local law enforcement for assistance. But not all Northwest cities are willing to comply.

This week, Trump’s Department of Homeland Security announced an aggressive plan to deport people who are in the United States illegally and who run afoul of the law.

On a visit to Olympia on Wednesday, U.S. Senator Patty Murray described the policy as “very wrongheaded.”

Ever since Donald Trump entered the presidential race, his comments on illegal immigration have been pored over in the press — from vows to deport millions of people to promises that any enforcement plan would have "a lot of heart." Observers asked, again and again, how rhetoric would translate into actual policy.

Now activists and experts have the policies themselves to examine.

KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

At the moment, border patrol agents can quickly deport someone within 100 miles of the southern border, and within 14 days of their arrival in the U.S. 


President Donald Trump
Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/9hKraP

Bill Radke talks to former Congressman Jim McDermott and former chairman of the Washington State Republican Party Chris Vance about the first 100 days of Donald Trump's presidency. They discuss immigration, Russia and the future of the Republican Party.  

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray in the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Seattle officials are threatening to sue the Trump Administration if they don't get detailed information about the president's immigration policies.

Mayor Ed Murray made the threat during the state of the city address Tuesday.

Updated 5:25 p.m. ET

The Trump administration is releasing more on its plans to crack down on illegal immigration, enforcing the executive orders President Trump issued in late January. Those orders called for increased border security and stricter enforcement of immigration laws.

The Department of Homeland Security issued the new rules on Tuesday, laid out in two documents signed by Secretary John Kelly.

The cellphone video is vivid. A Border Patrol agent aims his gun at an unarmed 15-year-old some 60 feet away, across the border with Mexico, and shoots him dead.

On Tuesday, the U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments in a case testing whether the family of the dead boy can sue the agent for damages in the U.S.

Between 2005 and 2013, there were 42 such cross-border shootings, a dramatic increase over earlier times.

Mohamed Rashid Mohamed has lived in Dadaab for more than 20 years. He hopes to move to Seattle, where he has relatives.
Courtesy of Rwaida Gharib

DADAAB REFUGEE CAMP, KENYA — Mohamed Rashid Mohamed has lived in the Dadaab refugee camp for more than two decades. It’s a sprawling desert camp, home to more than 265,000 refugees.

Courtesy Ramirez's lawyers

UPDATE: 2/17/17, 3:30 p.m. PT

A federal judge in Seattle declined to immediately release Daniel Ramirez Medina, as his attorneys requested Friday in U.S. District Court. Instead, Magistrate Judge James P. Donohue directed that Ramirez get a bond hearing in immigration court within a week.

Caption by photographer Dorothea Lange: Ester Naite, an office worker from Los Angeles, operates an electric iron in her quarters at Manzanar, California, a War Relocation Authority center where evacuees of Japanese ancestry will spend the duration.
Dorothea Lange/Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Division Washington, DC 20540 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print

It’s not often that we look back on ugly times in our nation’s history. We’re not very good at that as Americans.

But the Japanese internment has been coming up a lot lately.

Day Without Immigrants rally in Washington, D.C., February 16, 2017
Flickr Photo/Lorie Shaull (CC BY-SA 2.0) https://flic.kr/p/RXtwud

Blanca Rodriguez owns the Greenbridge Cafe in Seattle. On Thursday, she closed her doors to take part in A Day Without Immigrants, a national campaign that encouraged immigrants to stay home from work and school, close their businesses, and not go shopping.


Refugees are freezing to flee the US for Canada

Feb 17, 2017

Winters in Canada get cold. Really, really cold.

So people would have to be pretty desperate to walk across the wide expanses of deep snow separating Canada from the US.

But that’s what’s happening.

world relief refugees immigration immigrant
KUOW Photo/Ruby de Luna

The effects of President Trump’s travel ban have not been limited to immigrants entering the U.S. Nonprofit groups that resettle refugees are also facing uncertainty.

ijeoma knute erica barnett bill radke
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

The U.S. Supreme Court might be the next stop for a Richland florist who refused to arrange flowers for a same-sex wedding.

An undocumented "dreamer" picked up by federal immigration authorities in Seattle sues the government for his release. 

On Jan. 25, President Trump signed an executive order instructing construction to begin on a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. Environmentalists and civil rights activists say the proposed wall on the southern border with Mexico is a threat to the environmental rights of the people who live on both sides of the border.

Royal Canadian Mounted Police are reporting a flurry of illegal crossings into Canada in recent months. Officials say Quebec province has seen the highest influx of people seeking asylum, with many crossing in snowy, remote areas in northern New York.

One illegal crossing area that has become particularly popular among immigrants is in Champlain, N.Y., in the northeast corner of the state.

Immigrants and refugees in King County could soon benefit from more free legal services and education. This week King County Executive Dow Constantine proposed $750,000 in new legal defense funds.

Felimon Pineda (left), vice president of the union Familias Unidas por La Justica, marches from Burlington toward Mount Vernon on Sunday.
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Mike Youngquist has just about had it with Donald Trump on immigration. And with Democrats too.

"Neither one of them want to get in and solve the problem,” said Youngquist, a Republican who has been farming much of his life in the Skagit Valley. “They just want to argue about it."


Jeanette Vizguerra walked into a Colorado church on Wednesday — and into the forefront of a possible clash between Donald Trump and sanctuary churches across the country.

Vizguerra has lived in the U.S. since 1997. She has four children, three of them born here. Vizguerra was due to check in with Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Instead, she took sanctuary inside the First Unitarian Society of Denver.

Murtadha Al-Tameemi
KUOW Photo/Jason Pagano

A few days before President Donald Trump signed the executive order halting the arrival of immigrants and refugees from seven majority-Muslim countries, Murtadha Al-Tameemi was in Vancouver, B.C., about to watch his brother perform in a play.

His phone rang. It was an immigration attorney he worked with calling him. That was unexpected.


Bill Radke talks with KUOW immigration reporter Liz Jones about the arrest and detention of Daniel Ramirez Medina, who's been held at the Northwest Detention Center in Tacoma since Friday. Ramirez has temporary legal status through the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA. His attorneys have filed a federal lawsuit seeking his immediate release.

Updated at 3:45 p.m. ET

A 23-year-old man who was detained by Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agents in Seattle on Feb. 10 says his constitutional rights have been violated, and he is suing the U.S. government for his release.

Daniel Ramirez Medina, who is currently being held by immigration authorities in Tacoma, Wash., is registered with the U.S. government under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, program.

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