immigration | KUOW News and Information

immigration

Updated at 6:35 p.m. ET

On Thursday, a three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals issued a unanimous ruling that upheld a lower federal court's decision to temporarily block a Jan. 27 executive order on immigration.

The order suspends new-refugee admissions for 120 days, bans Syrian refugees indefinitely, and blocks travelers from seven Muslim-majority countries — Iraq, Iran, Syria, Yemen, Sudan, Libya and Somalia — for 90 days.

Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson prepares to talk to the media about a federal judge's ruling on the Trump refugee order Friday, Feb. 3, 2017.
KUOW photo/Amy Radil

President Trump’s immigration ban will remain on hold.

A three-judge panel unanimously denied the federal government’s appeal to reinstate parts of the executive order barring immigrants and refugees of seven predominantly Muslim countries from entering the country.

KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Washington state wins another round in court against President Trump's temporary immigration order when a federal appeals court refuses to reinstate the administration's travel ban impacting seven majority-Muslim nations.

KUOW Photo/Andy Hurst

Our Immigration Team has been talking with people from local communities who are affected by President Trump's travel ban. Mohamud Yussuf tells KUOW why he was initially was okay with President Trump winning the election, and why now he's afraid to leave the country, despite being a U.S. citizen. Yussuf is a Somali-American who publishes Runta News, which covers the Somali community in the Puget Sound region.

Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly says the U.S. needs to "do a better job to vet" residents of seven majority-Muslim countries that the Trump administration has temporarily banned from entering the U.S.

In an interview with Morning Edition host Rachel Martin, the retired Marine Corps general said the ban, which has been blocked by a district court order that is now being reviewed by the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, "is not based on religion in any way."

KUOW Photo/Andy Hurst

Kim Malcolm talks with Seattle attorney Takao Yamada about airportlawyer.org, a website he co-founded to provide legal assistance to refugees and immigrants affected by President Trump's travel ban.

When he was running for president, Donald Trump pledged to reduce immigration — both the illegal and legal varieties.

His allies in Congress hope to make good on that promise, and two Republican lawmakers have introduced new legislation targeting legal immigration.

The landmark Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 eased the path across the nation's borders for people from Asia and Africa — parts of the world that previously had limited opportunity to immigrate to the United States.

Why Tacoma will not be a sanctuary city

Feb 7, 2017

Bill Radke talks with Tacoma Mayor Marilyn Strickland about why she does not want Tacoma to be termed a sanctuary city. 

Bill Radke talks with Emily Bazelon about the ongoing court battle over President Trump's immigration and refugee travel ban. Bazelon is a staff writer for the New York Times Magazine and a senior research scholar at Yale Law School.

If a refugee commits a crime, will a federal judge have blood on his hands?

First it was companies like Amazon and Expedia. Now Washington state’s lawsuit against President Donald Trump’s executive order on immigration has the support of former top U.S. officials.

The Department of Justice has filed a brief with the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, responding to a legal challenge to President Trump's executive order on immigration.

The court is set to hear oral arguments by phone on Tuesday at 6 p.m. ET, in the next critical legal test of whether the president's decision to ban travel by people from seven Muslim-majority countries and halt refugee resettlement in the U.S. will be upheld.

Attorney General Bob Ferguson, left, greets Allen Novak, newly-arrived from Iran, his wife Jayne and their daughter Nikta, Monday, Feb. 6, 2017, at Sea-Tac Airport. Allen Novak joined his family, of Silverdale, Wash., on a conditional resident visa.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Liz Jones talks with Washington's Attorney General Bob Ferguson about the state's lawsuit against President Donald Trump. On Friday, a federal judge in Seattle ordered a temporary halt to the President's immigration ban.

KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Cordelia Revells anxiously peers down the arrival gate a Sea-Tac Airport.

“We’re looking for a family of six,” Revells says. “You’ll know it’s them because refugees typically carry a white and blue bag from the IOM.” (That’s the International Organization for Migration, which helps coordinate refugee travel from overseas.)


A federal appeals court denied President Trump's attempt to restore his travel ban on refugees and visa holders from seven majority-Muslim countries Sunday morning, sending people scrambling to board planes while it is legal once again for them to enter the country.

Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson prepares to talk to the media about a federal judge's ruling on the Trump refugee order Friday, Feb. 3, 2017.
KUOW photo/Amy Radil

What was the scene like?

KUOW’s Amy Radil: It's usually pretty sedate but there was a huge turnout to see this hearing. I heard some court employees talking saying they've never seen such a crowd. The courtrooms aren't that big so there was an overflow room a few floors up where people watched it on video.

Updated at 4:13 a.m. ET Sunday

President Trump's travel ban remains suspended, after the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit denied a Justice Department request to stay the suspension of President Trump's order.

The court asked opponents of the ban to respond to the Trump administration's appeal by Sunday at 11:59 p.m. PT; the court asked the Justice Department to respond by Monday at 3 p.m. PT.

KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

It ended almost as dramatically as it began.

After working “literally around the clock” all week, Washington state Attorney General Bob Ferguson and his team went to court against President Donald Trump Friday – and they won, securing a temporary halt to the President’s immigration ban.

Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson prepares to talk to the media about a federal judge's ruling on the Trump refugee order Friday, Feb. 3, 2017.
KUOW photo/Amy Radil

A federal court judge in Seattle has ordered a temporary halt to President Donald Trump’s immigration ban — nationwide.

B
Ashley Cleek

New York is called the "City of Immigrants" for good reason, as more than 3 million of its residents were born outside the US. So when President Donald Trump signed an executive order banning travel and immigration to the US by people from seven Muslim-majority nations, numerous protests erupted at airports and other places around the city.

Cab drivers briefly stopped picking up passengers at John F. Kennedy International Airport. And on Thursday, Yemeni bodega owners, declared a strike, too. They closed for eight hours, from noon to 8 p.m., to express their dismay. 

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David McNew/Reuters

On Sunday night, my dad was going through the security line at Washington Dulles International Airport to board a short domestic flight. It was, by his account, an uneventful evening, away from the protestors who were awaiting international arrivals.

Pramila Jayapal
Flickr Photo/Joe Mabel (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/zznt82

Democrats in the U.S. House have introduced a bill to try to prevent immigration restrictions like the ones in effect under President Trump. Trump's executive order temporarily bans immigrants from seven majority-Muslim countries and prohibits entry by any new refugees for four months.

WIR week in review vance barnett podlodowski radke
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Protesters take to Sea-Tac and airports around the country – and Washington state goes to court – over President Trump's executive order restricting travel to the U.S. from seven majority-Muslim nations.

Seattle votes to take its money elsewhere over the Dakota Access Pipeline and floats a new approach to homeless encampments around the city. 

Kellyanne Conway, counselor to the president, is under fire after making the false claim that Bowling Green, Ky., was the scene of a massacre carried out by Iraqis. Conway made the claim in an MSNBC interview that aired Thursday night, in which she argued in favor of President Trump's immigration and refugee ban.

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown issued an executive order Thursday meant to counteract President Trump's recent directives on immigration. The Democrat also announced a possible lawsuit against Trump’s actions.

Arshiya Chime, Omid Bagheri, and Hossein Khorram
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Bill Radke talks with Arshiya Chime, Omid Bagheri, and Hossein Khorram about President Trump's executive order that limits immigration and refugee resettlement. 

Chime is a doctoral candidate in mechanical engineering at the University of Washington. Bagheri is a faculty member at the UW's school of public health. Khorram is a real estate developer in Bellevue, and a Republic Party delegate for President Trump.

Washington refugees world map
KUOW/Kara McDermott

Nearly 25,000 immigrants and refugees in Washington state could be directly affected by an order signed last week (picture SafeCo Field almost half-full). Let’s break those numbers down. 

courtesy Northwest Immigrant Rights Project

The so-called Muslim travel ban may go beyond just stopping people from certain countries at the airport.

Seattle attorneys working with immigrants and refugees have found in recent days that their clients’ paperwork has been frozen in the system.

The White House moved up the president's announcement that he was nominating Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court by two days, possibly to distract from the firestorm of criticism over his chaotic rollout of his refugee policy.

But maybe the White House didn't have to worry.

New polls show the policy may not be as unpopular as all those protests over the weekend suggested.

Last week, President Trump signed an executive order suspending new-refugee admissions for 120 days and blocking travelers from seven Muslim-majority countries — Iraq, Iran, Syria, Yemen, Sudan, Libya and Somalia — for 90 days. Syrian refugees are banned indefinitely.

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