immigration

Chances for immigration reform dimmed even more this week, following the defeat of House Republican leader Eric Cantor. His surprising loss in the Virginia primary to Tea Party candidate David Brat is causing ripple effects here in Washington state, too, as local immigration advocates are rethinking their strategy.

This is the week undocumented students in Washington will become eligible for state college tuition aid. The Real Hope Act is just one of dozens of new state laws that take effect Thursday, 90 days after the Washington Legislature adjourned.

Digging into the nitty gritty of immigration law, the Supreme Court ruled Monday that some immigrant children who turn 21 while their parents' immigration application is still pending have to go to the back of the line and start over.

The Associated Press explains:

"The justices on Monday sided with the Obama administration in ruling that immigration laws do not let children who age out of the system qualify for visas.

Ross Reynolds talks to Giovanni Peri, an economics professor at U.C. Davis, about how foreign-born workers in science and technology might affect the health of economies. Peri argues that the federal government should increase the cap on H-1B worker visas, which would ultimately encourage economic growth and innovation.

In the late 1950s, when she was just 8 years old, Storm Reyes began picking fruit as a full-time farm laborer for less than $1 per hour. Storm and her family moved often, living in Native American migrant worker camps without electricity or running water.

With all that moving around, she wasn't allowed to have books growing up, Storm tells her son, Jeremy Hagquist, on a visit to StoryCorps in Tacoma, Wash.

"Books are heavy, and when you're moving a lot you have to keep things just as minimal as possible," she says.

KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

In October 2012, Seattle’s local government expanded in a way typically only seen in bigger cities. Former mayor Mike McGinn created the Office of Immigrant and Refugee Affairs, or OIRA, in an effort to give more voice to the area’s booming immigrant population. Nearly 20 percent of Seattle’s residents are born outside of the U.S., according to recent census figures.

AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

A hunger strike at the Northwest Detention Center in Tacoma recently ended after nearly two months, but the ripple effects continue. U.S. Congressman Adam Smith, D-Bellevue, plans to introduce a bill Thursday that would change how federal agencies operate and audit detention centers.

Flickr Photo/One America (CC BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde talks with Juan Jose Bocanegra, chairman of the May First Action Coalition, about the annual May Day march for immigration reform.

KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

There’s no special handshake. No code word. But for one secret group on the University of Washington campus in Seattle, identification papers – or, rather, a lack thereof – are a common denomination.

The UW’s student organization the Purple Group is for students, known as "dreamers," who came to the country illegally, often as young children.

KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

A steady protest has hung over an immigration lockup in Tacoma for more than a month.

In March, hundreds of detainees went on hunger strike. Outside the gates, families and supporters have gathered daily, waving signs that read “No More Deportations.”

A large crowd is expected outside the facility again this Saturday, as part of a national campaign. The protest has grown out of frustration about an impasse on immigration reform as detainees fight to avoid deportation and separation from their families.

‘I Wouldn’t Be Another Number’

AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Several immigrants being held at the Northwest Detention Center in Tacoma have been moved to isolation after a recent hunger strike at the facility.

KUOW Photo/Alisa Reznick

Skagit Valley is home to thousands of Mexican immigrants. Many make their livings working as farmhands. They've brought with them some of their traditions from their homeland. But as the years pass and younger generations move in, some of those traditions die off. One Mexican family in Burlington is trying to keep an old ritual alive.

As part of a series called "My Big Break," All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

Long before Cesar Millan became the "Dog Whisperer," with TV shows and a best-selling series of books, he had to learn how to ask for a job in English.

It's hard enough to drive through the Arizona desert, where the sun is harsh and the distances immense. This is the story of people who walk it.

In particular, it's the story of Brenda, who asked us to use only her first name. She told us yet another of the unbelievable stories you hear in the Borderland.

We met her in Nogales, Sonora, on the northern border of Mexico opposite Arizona. She was living in a shelter for deported people, where she told us of her brief and difficult stay in the United States.

Hundreds of people with tuberculosis wishing to come to the U.S. have been stopped before they reached U.S. borders, says a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Physicians overseas picked up more than 1,100 cases in prospective immigrants and refugees prior to their arrival in the U.S. The cases include 14 people with multidrug-resistant TB, the CDC says.

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