immigration

Apurva Koti, 16, plays tabla drums in his living room in Hyderabad, India.  Apurva also plays electric guitar. Apurva and his family moved to India from Redmond, Washington in 2008.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

HYDERABAD, INDIA – Decades ago, when immigrants moved to Seattle from India, they asked each other: “Why would you ever leave the U.S.?”

But now, a growing number of Indians are doing just that. And they’re doing it largely so the families they start here can bond with their homeland.

REDMOND, WASHINGTON -- Two young Indian co-workers face off across the table at a café on Microsoft’s main campus. The challenge? Who can eat the most panipuri: bite-sized Indian street food made up of a fried shell stuffed with spicy potatoes.

The RajGuru family was one of the first Indian families to move to Redmond in 1969. Matriarch Madhavi Rajguru's saris would often inspire curiosity.
Courtesy of Devki Rajguru

REDMOND, WASHINGTON – Long before Microsoft set up its headquarters here, and before the 520 highway extended this far, the RajGuru family moved to this Seattle suburb they knew almost nothing about. The year was 1969.

KUOW reporter Liz Jones conducting an interview in a farmers market in Hyderabad, India.
KUOW Photo/Harsha Vadlamani

Liz Jones traveled to Hyderabad, India this summer to report on its deepening connection with the Seattle area. She tells Bill Radke what she found and what we'll hear in her upcoming six-part series, "Two Indias, Near and Far." Get the story behind the photo at our Facebook page.

Liz Jones / KUOW

A federal lawsuit filed in Seattle Thursday highlights alleged document tampering in immigration cases. The lawsuit claims that government officials forged documents in a local deportation case, and attorneys who filed the case are calling for a broad investigation.

Mexico is helping some of its citizens apply for a controversial immigration program in the U.S. called Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA.

Since the Obama administration created the program in 2012, more than 580,000 unauthorized immigrants brought to the U.S. as minors have received temporary relief from deportation and been given work permits that last for at least two years.

KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Some leaders of a recent hunger strike at the Northwest Detention Center in Tacoma had their day in immigration court this week.

Marcie Sillman talks with Jorge Baron, executive director of the Northwest Immigrant Rights Project, about why Washington counties are not detaining immigrants per the request of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

This week in Seattle, a 10-year-old boy is scheduled to appear in immigration court along with his teenage brother and sister. The siblings fled to the United States to escape violence after gang members in El Salvador killed their father. Now they all face deportation, but no lawyer will represent them in court.

A file picture from Oct. 17, 2008, shows the "B" cell and bunk unit of the Northwest Detention Center in Tacoma, Wash.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Ross Reynolds talks with Alissa Ackerman, assistant professor of criminal justice at the University of Washington, Tacoma, about how private corporations that run prisons have been lobbying to increase the criminalization of immigration and what that means for the treatment of detainees.

Water Is The Sound Of Freedom For My ‘Ba’

Aug 28, 2014
Courtesy of Quang Adam Nguyen

I’m at a dock on Lake Washington and it’s a calm evening. I’m with my "ba" – dad in Vietnamese – Quang Adam Nguyen.

Ba is handy and loving. According to my mom, he’s “a little chubbier” than the “handsome, buff” man she married 25 years ago. My brother Andy calls him a “fixer,” and my sister Kristy says he’s “stubborn.”

He's always thinking and forgetting, about too much, if you ask me. He remodeled the house I’ve lived in my whole life but still hasn’t finished the gazebo. He did finish a waterfall in the yard, however. 

Ross Reynolds speaks with Sarah Tran, director of development at the Vietnamese Friendship Association, about the organization's programs to tutor immigrant parents and students in the skills they need to get through high school. 

Ross Reynolds talks with Degan Ali, executive director of the African charity and development agency, Adeso, about the difficulties Somali-Americans face when sending money to their homelands.

Somalia doesn't have any banks, so transfers are more informal. American banks are increasingly refusing to facilitate the transfers for fear that money will go to the terrorist group, al-Shabaab. But 40 percent of the Somali economy relies on money transfers, which supports people suffering from famine and the fallout of war.

Washington Congressman Denny Heck said the Department of Health and Human Services is no longer seeking facilities for temporary shelters for refugee children at Washington’s Joint Base Lewis-McChord.

Heck, who represents the 10th Congressional District which includes JBLM, said he trusts the department to make the right decisions about what facilities are best for the refugee children, but adds that he will continue to push for what he calls common sense, comprehensive immigration reform.

Oregonians will vote this fall on whether its residents should be able to apply for driver’s licenses regardless of their immigration status. Supporters of the measure kicked off their campaign Monday.

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