immigration | KUOW News and Information

immigration

wisetechcolleges / Flickr

On Wednesday, hundreds of immigrants and advocates plan to gather in Olympia to lay out their priorities for lawmakers. One top issue is called the Washington Dream Act, which state Senator Ed Murray, D-Seattle, introduced today. Under the measure, undocumented college students would become eligible for state financial aid.

longislandwins / Flickr

President Obama thinks E-Verify should be mandatory as part of his plan for immigration reform. Is this a good idea? How accurate is E-Verify? What happens if someone comes up negative? Is immigration contacted immediately? Ross Reynolds talks with CEO Roy Beck of Numbers USA, and Policy Analyst David Bier.

Big changes to US immigration policy could mean more temporary work visas for people with skills like computer programming. Employers in the Northwest including Microsoft say there aren’t enough US workers to meet demand. Now, a bipartisan group of Senators wants to expand the number of temporary worker visas from 65,000 to 115,000. But critics say those jobs can and should be filled by qualified US workers. Ross Reynolds talks with public policy advocate and political strategist Maria Cardona and president of the Programmers Guild, Kim Berry about the ongoing issue of temporary worker visas.

Shannon Dininny, File / AP Photo

This week, something new is sprouting in the Northwest’s fields and fruit orchards: optimism about immigration reform.

The Politics Of Federal Immigration Reform

Jan 29, 2013
Congressional Immigration Reform
AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite


There appears to be a bipartisan deal in Congress to reform the country's immigration policy, as Democrats and Republicans dance a delicate dance in the hopes that neither party jeopardizes the agreement. The proposal by a Senate "Gang of Eight" creates a path to citizenship for 11 million people living in the US without documentation, creates a more secure border and, the GOP hopes, could reshape the political calculations of a growing segment of the electorate. We look at the policy and the politics of immigration reform with University of Washington pollster Matt Barreto.

Clark County, WA

Some lawmakers in Olympia want to make the Department of Licensing an immigration checkpoint.
A proposed bill would require people to prove they are lawfully in the United States in order to get a driver’s license.

Spanish Flash Cards
Flickr / Art Of Backpacking

It’s a familiar problem wherever there are immigrants: students may not speak the language of their teachers.

In Mexico, immigrants from US have this problem. Many have never visited Mexico before and don’t speak Spanish.  

They’re the children of deported Americans. And Mexican teachers are reaching out to them – by learning English.

Other Stories From KUOW Presents on January 15, 2013:

sarah sosiak / Flickr

Immigrant advocates are cheering a change in federal policy. New guidelines from the Department of Homeland Security offer a small break to people who entered the country illegally and now have a spouse or child who is a US citizen.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection / cpb.gov

When a police officer needs to question someone in Spanish, or any other language, they can no longer use US Border Patrol agents as interpreters. This change in federal policy comes after a group of attorneys and the Northwest Immigrant Rights Project (NWIRP) in Seattle filed a complaint earlier this year. 

The U.S. Department of Agriculture has a long history of discriminating against farmers who are women, Hispanic, Native American and African American. Numerous lawsuits have cost the government several billion dollars. The latest legal settlement is for women and Hispanic farmers who can prove they were discriminated against in the 1980s and ‘90s. But some of these farmers say the deal to make amends for discrimination is itself discriminatory.

Magdaleno Rose-Avila and Enrique Cerna
CASA Latina / Facebook

Magdaleno Rose-Avila is the first director of Seattle’s Office of Immigrant and Refugee Affairs. He was selected by Mayor Mike McGinn for his decades of experience working with diverse communities in pursuit of human rights.

Her Immigrant Parents Chose Her College - And Her Career

Oct 17, 2012

Jane Wong never got to decide what she wanted to be when she grew up: her parents decided for her. “They decided that I would go into medical school,” she told RadioActive’s Kamna Shastri. “They decided that for my brother too. That was from when I was little, so I’ve sort of grown into the idea.”

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