Some new ripples this week in a Seattle-based immigration case that’s gained national attention. 

Class has just ended at a community center in the southern Swedish town of Ronneby. This is the first stop for refugees in the area, once they've been granted asylum. They receive 60 hours of instruction on how to live in Sweden. The courses cover such things as how to rent an apartment, get a job and grow old here.

Gustavo Gonzalez, who is from Guatemala, crossed the border illegally at age 17.
Courtesy of Northwest Immigrants Rights Project

A federal judge in Seattle will soon decide whether a local deportation case should extend to thousands of children across the country.   

The central question is whether children who face deportation should be entitled to government-appointed attorneys. 

Nestora Salgado, an activist from Renton who was imprisoned in Mexico, spoke with supporters upon arrival at Sea-Tac Airport.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Nestora Salgado — an activist and grandmother from Renton — is back home. Salgado spent more than two years in a Mexican prison on charges that have now been dropped.  A crowd gathered at Sea-Tac Airport to greet her, as KUOW’s Liz Jones reports.

Will America Fall Like Rome?

Mar 1, 2016
Rome sunset.
Flickr Photo/Guillermo Alonso (CC BY SA 2.0)/

Bill Radke speaks with University of Washington classics professor Sarah Stroup about her view that America is becoming more xenophobic and how we seem to be paralleling Ancient Rome.  

Americans craving kung pao chicken or a good lo mein for dinner have plenty of options: The U.S. is home to more than 40,000 Chinese restaurants.

One could think of this proliferation as a promise fulfilled — America as the great melting pot and land of opportunity for immigrants. Ironically, the legal forces that made this Chinese culinary profusion possible, beginning in the early 20th century, were born of altogether different sentiments: racism and xenophobia.

Kimberly Rodriguez, a new recruit for the Seattle Police Department, on her first day at the police academy. That class of 30 recruits included eight women, which was unusual. Most classes have between one and five female recruits.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Kim Malcolm talks with King County Sheriff John Urquhart about a proposed law that would allow any legal Washington resident – not just American citizens – to become a police officer.

How My Bookworm Sister Left Our Refugee Camp

Feb 18, 2016
A woman named Kamin and her six children lived in the Kakuma refugee camp in Kenya where Faisa Muse, the producer of this story, also lived before moving to Seattle. The woman had been separated from her husband during the conflict in Somalia.
Flickr Photo/European Commission

My sister Nasteha Muse fought hard to get an education.

We grew up in the Kakuma Refugee Camp in Kenya. Our parents migrated there because of the conflict in Somalia, where they are from. Nasteha remembers the camp as "very harsh, dusty and hot." 

Updated at 4:24 p.m. on Feb. 17: Pedro Figueroa was released on bail from an ICE detention center on Feb. 3. Also, the San Francisco Police Department initially denied that it had cooperated with federal immigration agents. But an internal ICE document shows that the police and sheriff were in direct communication with ICE about Figueroa.

Workers at Casa Latina run a morning lottery to distribute job requests for housecleaning, painting, yard work and other odd jobs.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

It’s 7 a.m., time for the morning lottery inside Casa Latina’s worker center.

One guy shakes a blue canister then pulls out plastic ID cards for the 40 or so workers here today. Most are Latino men, but not all.

The Obama administration is implementing changes — voted into law by Congress late last year — that tighten the visa waiver program, specifically targeting Iran, Iraq, Sudan and Syria. But the administration is reserving the right to make exceptions on a case-by-case basis.

The Supreme Court of the United States has decided to review a challenge to President Obama's executive actions on immigration.

As we've reported, back in November 2014, Obama announced plans to shield from deportation up to 5 million immigrants who are in the U.S. illegally. Even before his plans got off the ground, lower courts put them on hold.

Seattle resident Ignacio Lanuza
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

A former government attorney in Seattle pleaded guilty Friday to falsifying documents in a deportation case. KUOW’s race and culture reporter Liz Jones has been following this lawsuit.

Trinidad Vidal says fears of deportation have weighed on her for 22 years.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Immigrant advocates have scheduled several workshops in the Seattle area due to concerns about immigration raids. It comes on the heels of a federal operation to deport families from Central America.

During World War II, thousands of Americans lied about their age to enlist in the military. During the Iraq war, Daniel Torres lied about something else.

"I didn't want to be just another Mexican living in the U.S. I wanted to say I'd done something for the country," said Torres.