immigration | KUOW News and Information

immigration

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Saul Gonzalez

Some US voters are feeling hopeful post-election. But others across the country don't feel that way, especially immigrants.

“How many synonyms are there for fear, anxiety and rage?” says KCRW Los Angeles reporter Saul Gonzalez. “It's all of those emotions every place I go to in LA’s many immigrant-rich communities. There is a lot of concern here about what's going to happen next in this country.”

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Jean-Paul Pelissier/Reuters

In France, President-elect Donald Trump’s victory this week has immediately provoked comparisons to the country’s own presidential contest — made both by the media and the French candidates themselves.

Following the US elections and, before that, the Brexit vote and regional victories by Germany’s far-right AFD-party, France is positioned as the next major referendum in Europe between progressive and rightist visions of their country.

Undocumented mother and daughter Evelyn Guzman and Alejandra Perez say a new president brings uncertainly to their lives in the U.S.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Throughout his campaign, Donald Trump called for tougher immigration policies. The stakes are high for unauthorized immigrants in the Northwest. 


When you're facing a major life change, it helps to talk to someone who's already been through it. All Things Considered is connecting people on either side of a shared experience, and they're letting us eavesdrop on their conversations in our series Been There.

Halley Katz has almost always known what career she wanted to pursue.

Adoptee Rights Campaign

Kim Malcolm talks with Jenny Kim about why so many international adoptees in the U.S. don't have citizenship. Jenny Kim is vice chair of the Korean American Coalition and an organizer with the Adoptee Rights Campaign. She's an advocate for Adam Crapser, a 41-year-old Washington man who was adopted from South Korea as a toddler. He's now  facing deportation over criminal charges.

courtesy Lori Walls

When Adam Crapser was three years old, an Oregon couple adopted him from South Korea. His life in America has been bleak at times. But Crapser, 41, probably never imagined his difficulties would lead to deportation back to the country he left as a toddler.

Yet, to his surprise, he’s not a U.S. citizen. It turns out his adoptive parents never filled out the forms.


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Jason Margolis

A decade ago, Marwan Sweedan was performing surgeries in Iraq. At the time, his family was working with coalition forces, and they became targets.

“My dad got captured, kidnapped, tortured and killed,” says Sweedan.

He says doctors were also being marked, so he applied for refugee status and was later relocated to San Jose, California.

“Being a refugee is not something you plan for, you don’t wake up in the morning and go, ‘I’m going to be a refugee today.’ No, it just happened,” says the 37-year-old Sweedan. 

Adam Crapser was brought to the United States when he was 3, to start a new life — new parents, new culture, new country.

But his adoptive parents didn't complete his citizenship papers. Then they abandoned him to the foster care system.

And now, as a 41-year-old father of four, he's being deported. Despite his appeals for help, he has been ordered to be sent back to South Korea, a country The Associated Press describes as "completely alien to him."

His predicament is the result of parental failings, a criminal past and acts of Congress.

French security forces have started evicting the thousands of migrants living in a notorious camp known as "The Jungle" near the port of Calais.

Authorities intend to dismantle the squalid camp that, despite its poor living conditions, has housed thousands of people fleeing wars or poverty for a better life in Europe. Many hope to reach the U.K. — which lies just 26 miles away across the English Channel. Others are seeking asylum in France.

Rashid Abdi registers to vote for the first time
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Amina Ahmed faces an uphill battle on a breezy Saturday morning in a neighborhood straddling Tukwila and SeaTac: She's running a voter registration drive.

Ahmed is up against power and influence in American politics. The wealthy have it. And they also vote at much higher rates.


Brent Harger of Washoe County, Nev., says he has always voted, but until this year, he'd never really gotten involved in politics.

"I've always been told my voice means nothing. I don't believe that," Harger says. "And there's a lot of people that are scared to even say anything today because they don't think their voice means anything."

Omar Ali with his family. Omar is standing fourth form the left holding his daughter.
Courtesy of Awal Ibrahim

Recently, my whole family got together to celebrate my sister’s graduation. Everyone was very excited.

But my family wasn’t always all together here in Seattle. My uncle Omar Ali is responsible for us being together at this exact moment.

Paige Parsons

Ross Reynolds interviews Arlie Hochschild, professor of sociology at the University of California Berkeley, about her new book, “Strangers in Their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right", which has just been listed as a finalist for a 2016 National Book Award in Non-Fiction.

Hochschild spent five years among low income people in rural Louisiana in order to understand the conservative movement. 

Tu Tu - people from Burma don't have last names – at his cousin's two-bedroom apartment in Kent. His arrival upped the number of people living there to nine.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Tu Tu is his full name, because Burmese people don't use last names.

He is 20 when he arrives in Seattle. With his long bangs and torn jeans, he looks American.

It terrifies him that he can’t speak English. How will he get by if he can’t communicate? It’s a fear he pushes out of his mind. He’s not supposed to be a kid anymore.

Washington Secretary of State Kim Wyman Friday introduced a proposal that would allow election officials to verify the citizenship of voters in the state. It comes in response to questions about whether the suspect in a recent shooting near Seattle voted legally.

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