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Thanks to improved health care, the Native American populations around the country are growing. But the number of homes hasn't kept up. That's especially true of the Northern Arapaho on Wyoming's Wind River Indian Reservation.

Northern Arapaho elder Kenneth Shakespeare raised seven children in a house with views of mountains and hayfields surrounding it. But now he has dementia and it's his kids turn to take care of him in the same four-bedroom, two-bath house they grew up in.

'Week in Review' panelists Bill Radke, Knute Berger, Joni Balter and Eli Sanders.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

It is the last Week In Review before election day. We’ll be talking about the tightening polls and what local races to watch for on election night.

Also Vancouver has been dealing with an affordable housing crisis. They decided to put a tax on foreign buyers as a way to cool the housing market, and it’s working. But where will those buyers go? And should Seattle consider something similar?

The old Liberty Bank building in Seattle's Central Area before it was demolished. Affordable housing will go up in its place.
Google Maps

There's a new building going up in the heart of Seattle's Central District.

It's a project that could help bring back renters who've been priced out of the neighborhood.


Michelle Dozier, Toya Thomas and Elimika James face eviction from the Renton Woods apartments. Residents of cities in South King County do not enjoy the same tenant protections that exist in many other parts of King County.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

In Seattle, it’s against the law for a landlord to reject a tenant based on the source of their income. But those kind of protections don’t extend to many cities in South King County, cities like Kent, SeaTac and Renton.

Here are three women trying to change that.


Apartment buildings in the University District, Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Times columnist Jon Talton about a tax Vancouver, B.C. imposed on foreign real estate buyers and its impact on Seattle's housing market. 

In the aftermath of the Great Depression, the U.S. government set out to evaluate the riskiness of mortgages — and left behind a stunning portrait of the racism and discrimination that has shaped American housing policy.

Now a new digital tool makes it easier than ever to see that history in high-resolution.

With her infant son in a sling, Monique Black strolls through a weekend open house in the gentrified Shaw neighborhood of Washington, D.C. There are lots of factors to consider when looking for a home — in this one, Monique notices, the tiny window in the second bedroom doesn't let in enough light. But for parents like Black and her husband, Jonny, there's a more important question: How good are the nearby schools?

Kevin Boggs in his tent in the Jungle. He moved into the Jungle on Dec. 1 last winter after moving down from Lake City where his tent had been repeatedly ransacked.
KUOW Photo/Mike Kane

Kevin Boggs is trying to find a way out of the Jungle, the large homeless camp under Interstate 5 in Seattle. But it's not that easy. Listen to some of his story to hear what he's doing in his search for stable housing. 

KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Sound Transit's newest light rail station opened Saturday at Angle Lake, just south of Sea-Tac International Airport, to live music, dance troupes and protests.

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown has appointed Margaret Salazar as the new head of the state agency that handles works to provide affordable housing. The announcement was made as lawmakers gear up to tackle housing issues during next year's legislative session.

KUOW Photo/Caroline Chamberlain

Bill Radke sits down with Sean Liming, a Capitol Hill resident who is attending the neighborhood's first ever renters summit. At the summit, he'll be calling for renters in Capitol Hill, who make up 80 percent of the neighborhood's residents, to unite to create policy ideas to combat skyrocketing rents. 

Gayle Nowicki of Gargoyles Statuary says growth is coming, so why fight it? She just hopes there will be a place in the future U-District for small, funky businesses like hers
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Bill Radke speaks with KUOW's Joshua McNichols about Seattle Mayor Ed Murray's plan to allow taller buildings in areas of the University District. 

Bill Radke speaks with Stephen Quinn, host of CBC radio's On The Coast, about a cool down of the Vancouver housing market. 

Apartment buildings in Seattle
Flickr photo/N i c o l a (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/peTBEw

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle landlord Hugh Brannon about a new ordinance the Seattle City Council passed this week.

The measure aims to reduce housing discrimination through a series of mechanisms, but Brannon explains why he believes certain aspects of this law are counterproductive and take the "human element" out of being a landlord.

Apartment buildings in the University District, Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Bill Radke speaks with reporter Heidi Groover of The Stranger about a new law Seattle City Council passed unanimously Monday targeting housing discrimination.

If you live in an apartment complex in the greater Seattle area, you might open your door this summer and find a pair of college students in green polos on your front step. They won’t try to get you to vote, buy their wares or convert you. They just want you to recycle.

Bill Radke speaks with Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer about a tax on foreign buyers purchasing residential properties in Vancouver. 

Here’s a map of the neighborhoods that would see changes. HALA August 2016
Mayor Ed Murray's office

Seattle neighborhoods could start seeing bigger buildings under new zoning framework passed by a City Council committee Tuesday. The framework also requires that developers provide affordable housing units.

Audio Pending...

Sandra Anderson enjoys a celebratory meal at one of her favorite restaurants with Kevin Krause and Ravenna Candy from the nonprofit, Navos. Anderson is graduating from Navos' housing program – her apartment will be signed over to her name.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Rob Gilroy had a wife, kids and a good job as a garbage collector. Then a divorce kicked his butt. 

“I was grieving,” Gilroy said. “Unfortunately, I turned to drugs. And the bottom line when it comes to drugs is you’re going to end up with nothing.”


Moe Toure runs Toure Apparel in a strip mall on one of Vulcan Real Estate's 23rd Avenue properties.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

For years, the Central District didn’t get much investment. But recently, the city poured money into infrastructure improvements on 23rd Avenue. Then Vulcan bought a city block of real estate along the route. 

The real estate giant is planning 40,000 square feet of retail space and 570 apartments. They’re also planning a second development across the street.


Seattle leaders have scrapped their proposed regulations on Airbnb and other vacation rentals. City Council member Tim Burgess revealed a new plan during a Wednesday committee meeting.

Apartment buildings in the University District, Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Kim Malcolm talks with Seattle City Councilmember Mike O'Brien about a proposal that would limit how much landlords could charge for security deposits and other move-in fees. We also hear from Roger Valdez, director of Smart Growth Seattle.

Deborah Wang talks to Kelly Rider with the nonprofit Housing Development Consortium and Brianna McDonald, a Seattle homeowner, about Proposition 1, the property tax levy renewal for affordable housing. 

El Centro de la Raza's Estela Ortega is for the levy, while Wallingford homeowner Glenn Singer is against it.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Seattle’s affordable housing levy has paid for thousands of affordable apartments over the years. But the current levy expires at the end of this year. Now voters must decide whether to approve a new housing levy that’s twice the size of the old one.

When Julian Castro assumed the post of Housing and Urban Development secretary in 2014, the U.S. government already had a few programs aimed at expanding Americans' access to the Internet. It's the sort of thing that is paramount to success in the modern economy, long advocated by President Obama and other government officials.

This Capitol Hill, Seattle home could be bought on a single middle class income for a family of six for $16,000 in 1957.
KUOW Photo/Emily Fox

When I thought about moving to Seattle a few months ago, I was shocked at how expensive everything was.

I grew up in a Michigan town where the average house is worth about $125,000 today, and rent goes for about half of what it is in Seattle.

Knowing the lifestyle that my middle class grandparents were able to have here 60 years ago, I wondered if that Seattle will ever be able to be achievable again for middle class folks like me.

Totten has been homeless since May. He brings his laundry to the Hygiene Center in Pioneer Square.
KUOW Photo/Ruby de Luna

The housing market is hot, and older Seattleites are feeling the squeeze. 

A major bank is giving away up to $5 million today and tomorrow so that people in King County can buy a home. 

Wells Fargo says it will give up to $7,500 to people who qualify today and Saturday at an event at the Westin Hotel in downtown Seattle.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Mock-up of the Compass Crossing pilot project.
Courtesy of Compass Housing Alliance

Bill Radke speaks with OneBuild founder Dale Sperling, about the steel modular housing his company is making for Seattle's homeless. OneBuild is partnering with Compass Housing Alliance to provide 13 modules and social services to some of the city's homeless. Billionaire Paul Allen has donated $1 million to the pilot project.

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