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Teacher Briana Nelson would like to have a place of her own in the Central District.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Seattle’s Central District was historically important to African Americans, until many were priced out.


A view of one of Cast Architecture's backyard cottages. The firm has been a leader promoting backyard cottages in Seattle
Courtesy of Cast Architecture

A housing plan to bring more backyard cottages to Seattle was halted Tuesday when the city's hearing examiner ruled that the proposal needs to undergo a full environmental review, not just approval through the city council.

City Councilmember Kshama Sawant speaks at her election night party at Melrose Market in Seattle on Tuesday, Nov. 3, 2015.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

There are new limits on how much Seattle landlords can charge for move-in fees. The City Council unanimously approved the rules Monday after months of debate between tenant advocates and landlords.

KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

The city of Seattle wants your feedback on a plan to channel more growth and affordable housing into the city’s most popular neighborhoods.

Rising rents are casting a pall over life for many people in the greater Seattle area.
Craigslist.org screenshot

The number the Census Bureau watches for is 30 percent of household income.

An NPR listener (with what may be the best Twitter handle ever — Booky McReaderpants) inquired whether a home can be powered by bicycle-powered generator.

It's an interesting issue about energy and the modern world. And the short answer comes from just running the numbers.

Apartment buildings in the University District, Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Jeannie Yandel talks to Xochitl Maykovich, an organizer with the Washington Community Action Network, and Brian Robinson, a Seattle landlord who's on the board of directors at the Rental Housing Association, about the pros and cons of the Seattle City Council legislation that would put a cap on move-in fees. 

Seattle police approach man on the street, part of the group show, We are still here, at Gallery4Culture.
Delino Olebar, courtesy Creative Justice Project

Gentrification and housing affordability are hot topics in Seattle right now.

They affect everyone, but typically politicians or media-savvy types dominate the public debate.

Home prices in the Seattle and Portland metro areas are rising faster than anywhere else in the country right now -- about twice as fast as the national average.

Seattle's Mayor and City Council approve their own agenda for the state Legislature every year. For the 2017 legislative session, the city is calling for more protections for tenants and for people of color.


Seattle renters could get a break on rental costs as soon as mid-January. A City Council committee advanced a measure Tuesday that would cap move-in fees.

Eric Jordan and Lisa Hooper are trying to make their camp Rainier Avenue S more tidy and clean. But they feel constrained by the state, which won't let them bring in garbage cans or porta-potties and regularly promises to evict them.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Seattle and other west coast cities are bucking the national homeless trend — and not for the better.

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development announced the numbers from its annual point-in-time count Thursday. The number of homeless people in the U.S. is down 14 percent compared to the year 2010.

Thanks to improved health care, the Native American populations around the country are growing. But the number of homes hasn't kept up. That's especially true of the Northern Arapaho on Wyoming's Wind River Indian Reservation.

Northern Arapaho elder Kenneth Shakespeare raised seven children in a house with views of mountains and hayfields surrounding it. But now he has dementia and it's his kids turn to take care of him in the same four-bedroom, two-bath house they grew up in.

'Week in Review' panelists Bill Radke, Knute Berger, Joni Balter and Eli Sanders.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

It is the last Week In Review before election day. We’ll be talking about the tightening polls and what local races to watch for on election night.

Also Vancouver has been dealing with an affordable housing crisis. They decided to put a tax on foreign buyers as a way to cool the housing market, and it’s working. But where will those buyers go? And should Seattle consider something similar?

The old Liberty Bank building in Seattle's Central Area before it was demolished. Affordable housing will go up in its place.
Google Maps

There's a new building going up in the heart of Seattle's Central District.

It's a project that could help bring back renters who've been priced out of the neighborhood.


Michelle Dozier, Toya Thomas and Elimika James face eviction from the Renton Woods apartments. Residents of cities in South King County do not enjoy the same tenant protections that exist in many other parts of King County.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

In Seattle, it’s against the law for a landlord to reject a tenant based on the source of their income. But those kind of protections don’t extend to many cities in South King County, cities like Kent, SeaTac and Renton.

Here are three women trying to change that.


Apartment buildings in the University District, Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Times columnist Jon Talton about a tax Vancouver, B.C. imposed on foreign real estate buyers and its impact on Seattle's housing market. 

In the aftermath of the Great Depression, the U.S. government set out to evaluate the riskiness of mortgages — and left behind a stunning portrait of the racism and discrimination that has shaped American housing policy.

Now a new digital tool makes it easier than ever to see that history in high-resolution.

With her infant son in a sling, Monique Black strolls through a weekend open house in the gentrified Shaw neighborhood of Washington, D.C. There are lots of factors to consider when looking for a home — in this one, Monique notices, the tiny window in the second bedroom doesn't let in enough light. But for parents like Black and her husband, Jonny, there's a more important question: How good are the nearby schools?

Kevin Boggs in his tent in the Jungle. He moved into the Jungle on Dec. 1 last winter after moving down from Lake City where his tent had been repeatedly ransacked.
KUOW Photo/Mike Kane

Kevin Boggs is trying to find a way out of the Jungle, the large homeless camp under Interstate 5 in Seattle. But it's not that easy. Listen to some of his story to hear what he's doing in his search for stable housing. 

KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Sound Transit's newest light rail station opened Saturday at Angle Lake, just south of Sea-Tac International Airport, to live music, dance troupes and protests.

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown has appointed Margaret Salazar as the new head of the state agency that handles works to provide affordable housing. The announcement was made as lawmakers gear up to tackle housing issues during next year's legislative session.

KUOW Photo/Caroline Chamberlain

Bill Radke sits down with Sean Liming, a Capitol Hill resident who is attending the neighborhood's first ever renters summit. At the summit, he'll be calling for renters in Capitol Hill, who make up 80 percent of the neighborhood's residents, to unite to create policy ideas to combat skyrocketing rents. 

Gayle Nowicki of Gargoyles Statuary says growth is coming, so why fight it? She just hopes there will be a place in the future U-District for small, funky businesses like hers
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Bill Radke speaks with KUOW's Joshua McNichols about Seattle Mayor Ed Murray's plan to allow taller buildings in areas of the University District. 

Bill Radke speaks with Stephen Quinn, host of CBC radio's On The Coast, about a cool down of the Vancouver housing market. 

Apartment buildings in Seattle
Flickr photo/N i c o l a (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/peTBEw

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle landlord Hugh Brannon about a new ordinance the Seattle City Council passed this week.

The measure aims to reduce housing discrimination through a series of mechanisms, but Brannon explains why he believes certain aspects of this law are counterproductive and take the "human element" out of being a landlord.

Apartment buildings in the University District, Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Bill Radke speaks with reporter Heidi Groover of The Stranger about a new law Seattle City Council passed unanimously Monday targeting housing discrimination.

If you live in an apartment complex in the greater Seattle area, you might open your door this summer and find a pair of college students in green polos on your front step. They won’t try to get you to vote, buy their wares or convert you. They just want you to recycle.

Bill Radke speaks with Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer about a tax on foreign buyers purchasing residential properties in Vancouver. 

Here’s a map of the neighborhoods that would see changes. HALA August 2016
Mayor Ed Murray's office

Seattle neighborhoods could start seeing bigger buildings under new zoning framework passed by a City Council committee Tuesday. The framework also requires that developers provide affordable housing units.

Audio Pending...

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