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Gayle Nowicki of Gargoyles Statuary says growth is coming, so why fight it? She just hopes there will be a place in the future U-District for small, funky businesses like hers
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Bill Radke speaks with KUOW's Joshua McNichols about Seattle Mayor Ed Murray's plan to allow taller buildings in areas of the University District. 

Bill Radke speaks with Stephen Quinn, host of CBC radio's On The Coast, about a cool down of the Vancouver housing market. 

Apartment buildings in Seattle
Flickr photo/N i c o l a (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/peTBEw

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle landlord Hugh Brannon about a new ordinance the Seattle City Council passed this week.

The measure aims to reduce housing discrimination through a series of mechanisms, but Brannon explains why he believes certain aspects of this law are counterproductive and take the "human element" out of being a landlord.

housing: Apartment buildings in the University District, Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Bill Radke speaks with reporter Heidi Groover of The Stranger about a new law Seattle City Council passed unanimously Monday targeting housing discrimination.

If you live in an apartment complex in the greater Seattle area, you might open your door this summer and find a pair of college students in green polos on your front step. They won’t try to get you to vote, buy their wares or convert you. They just want you to recycle.

Bill Radke speaks with Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer about a tax on foreign buyers purchasing residential properties in Vancouver. 

Here’s a map of the neighborhoods that would see changes. HALA August 2016
Mayor Ed Murray's office

Seattle neighborhoods could start seeing bigger buildings under new zoning framework passed by a City Council committee Tuesday. The framework also requires that developers provide affordable housing units.

Audio Pending...

Sandra Anderson enjoys a celebratory meal at one of her favorite restaurants with Kevin Krause and Ravenna Candy from the nonprofit, Navos. Anderson is graduating from Navos' housing program – her apartment will be signed over to her name.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Rob Gilroy had a wife, kids and a good job as a garbage collector. Then a divorce kicked his butt. 

“I was grieving,” Gilroy said. “Unfortunately, I turned to drugs. And the bottom line when it comes to drugs is you’re going to end up with nothing.”


Moe Toure runs Toure Apparel in a strip mall on one of Vulcan Real Estate's 23rd Avenue properties.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

For years, the Central District didn’t get much investment. But recently, the city poured money into infrastructure improvements on 23rd Avenue. Then Vulcan bought a city block of real estate along the route. 

The real estate giant is planning 40,000 square feet of retail space and 570 apartments. They’re also planning a second development across the street.


Seattle leaders have scrapped their proposed regulations on Airbnb and other vacation rentals. City Council member Tim Burgess revealed a new plan during a Wednesday committee meeting.

housing: Apartment buildings in the University District, Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Kim Malcolm talks with Seattle City Councilmember Mike O'Brien about a proposal that would limit how much landlords could charge for security deposits and other move-in fees. We also hear from Roger Valdez, director of Smart Growth Seattle.

Deborah Wang talks to Kelly Rider with the nonprofit Housing Development Consortium and Brianna McDonald, a Seattle homeowner, about Proposition 1, the property tax levy renewal for affordable housing. 

El Centro de la Raza's Estela Ortega is for the levy, while Wallingford homeowner Glenn Singer is against it.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Seattle’s affordable housing levy has paid for thousands of affordable apartments over the years. But the current levy expires at the end of this year. Now voters must decide whether to approve a new housing levy that’s twice the size of the old one.

When Julian Castro assumed the post of Housing and Urban Development secretary in 2014, the U.S. government already had a few programs aimed at expanding Americans' access to the Internet. It's the sort of thing that is paramount to success in the modern economy, long advocated by President Obama and other government officials.

This Capitol Hill, Seattle home could be bought on a single middle class income for a family of six for $16,000 in 1957.
KUOW Photo/Emily Fox

When I thought about moving to Seattle a few months ago, I was shocked at how expensive everything was.

I grew up in a Michigan town where the average house is worth about $125,000 today, and rent goes for about half of what it is in Seattle.

Knowing the lifestyle that my middle class grandparents were able to have here 60 years ago, I wondered if that Seattle will ever be able to be achievable again for middle class folks like me.

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