Housing: Condos along Seattle's downtown waterfront.
Flickr Photo/Ryan Lackey (CC BY 2.0)

Adding or preserving 20,000 affordable housing units in Seattle sounds great for renters on paper.

But Sharon Lee, executive director of the Low Income Housing Institute, told KUOW’s Ross Reynolds there are some holes in Mayor Ed Murray's plan for housing over the next 10 years.

Stackhouse Apartments, South Lake Union
KUOW Photo/Ross Reynolds

Ross Reynolds speaks with Richard Hagar, a local real estate investor and pundit, to get one view of what Mayor Ed Murray's new affordable housing proposals would mean for Seattle renters. 

Mayor Ed Murray speaks at an announcement of the city's proposals to build more affordable housing.
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray unveiled a package of proposals Monday aimed at dramatically increasing the supply of affordable housing in a city that would be taller and denser.

The goal is to build 20,000 more affordable housing units over the next decade. 

housing: Apartment buildings in the University District, Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Ross Reynolds talks with Faith Li Pettis, co-chair of Seattle's Housing Affordability and Livability Committee, about new recommendations for solving the city's affordable housing crisis.

housing: Apartment buildings in the University District, Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Bill Radke talks with KUOW reporter Deborah Wang about a plan to solve Seattle's housing problems. A task force appointed by Seattle mayor Ed Murray releases its recommendations on Monday.

home, house, housing: An aerial shot of the Greenwood neighborhood in Seattle, 1969.
Flickr Photo/Seattle Municipal Archives (CC-BY-NC-ND)

A draft city report pokes at Seattle’s single-family character. Also: Why don’t we rope off the dangerous Big Four Ice Caves in the Cascades? Would a Seattle gun tax infringe on your right to bear arms? And in a super-dry Seattle summer, should you be conserving water, or not?

Bill Radke debates the week’s news with Crosscut's Knute Berger, journalist Tonya Mosley and former state GOP chair Chris Vance.

Dear Seattle: It's Time To Desegregate

Jul 9, 2015

Ross Reynolds talks with Ron Sims, former King County executive and former deputy secretary for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, about new rules aimed to address persistent housing segregation in cities. Explore an interactive map of race based on the 2010 census. 

Apartments in downtown Seattle.
Flickr Photo/Dan Reed (CC BY NC 2.0)

David Hyde talks to University of Washington philosopher Michael Blake, who says Seattle's rent control debate is about more than economics. 

Robert Street with John L. Scott Foreclosures shows an auctioneer his money at the foreclosure auction that takes place outside the King County courthouse in downtown Seattle every Friday.
KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

The Seattle-area housing market could use an injection of inventory. It’s on a tear right now, fueled by high demand and low supply, and hooked on low-interest rates.

And there is a potential supply of lower-priced homes in the region. Those are the 4,300 foreclosed homes from Everett to Tacoma that are now owned by banks, according to RealtyTrac.

Single-family homes such as this one in Greenwood could be rezoned to become a multi-family dwelling should draft proposals by Seattle's affordable housing task force come to fruition.
Courtesy of Hana Sevcikova

Ross Reynolds speaks with Erica C. Barnett about leaked draft recommendations from Seattle Mayor Ed Murray's Housing Affordability and Livability Committee. Some of the recommendations would require a dramatic rethinking of the way Seattleites see home.

Allison Dunmire, a stay-at-home mom in Kirkland, is having a tough time finding a house to buy -- even one they don't like all that much.
KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

It’s tough to buy a house in Seattle at the moment.

The shortage of houses on the market has widened the gap between those who can plunk down far more than the asking price – often in cash – and those without such means.

Jennifer Nugent and her three kids are throwing a big, blue ball around in the small living room of their rental home.

The kids are happy, but Nugent isn't. She planned to raise them in a place with much more room to play.

And she was. That is, until she learned that home was uninhabitable.

Two years ago, she and her husband bought a country home in the small central Indiana town of Mooresville.

"It was blue and it had a lot of potential for us to add on," she says. "We really, really wanted that house."

Edith Macefield's Ballard home was surrounded by development .
flickr photo/Payton Chung (CC BY 2.0)

The story of Edith Macefield’s famous “UP!” House has taken another turn.

Paul Thomas, with Realty Brokers of Seattle, says the winners of an auction for the house this spring have backed out after it became apparent the building's age and condition would make it too expensive to fix. And that means the house will be donated and moved or demolished, and the land under it sold, Thomas said.

Bill Radke and Joni Balter prep for a live broadcast of Week In Review at the Northgate Community Center on Friday, June 26, 2015.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

The city plans to make its neighborhoods denser AND keep them lovable. How? And: Is it wrong to expose a Seattle police ticket trap? How can our state government come unstuck? 

Bill Radke debates the week's news with former mayor Mike McGinn, former state GOP chair Chris Vance and Seattle Channel's Joni Balter.

Kathy Nyland, director of Seattle's Department of Neighborhoods.
Courtesy of Seattle.gov

Marcie Sillman talks to Kathy Nyland, the new director of the Seattle Department of Neighborhoods, about how she went from advocating for the Georgetown neighborhood to a job with the city.