housing | KUOW News and Information

housing

The King County Council decided to put a proposed property tax increase before voters this November. The levy renews funding for veterans and now also, seniors.

$360,000 is the asking price for this 740 square foot house in the Rainier Beach neighborhood of Seattle
KUOW Photos / Megan Farmer

Sonny Kwan, a real estate agent in Seattle, was shocked recently by a listing he saw just off Rainier Avenue South.

Top candidates for Seattle mayor debate in a forum hosted by KING 5 and KUOW.
KING 5

Are Seattle taxes too high? And where should the city look for future funding? Those were the big questions for six of the city’s candidates for mayor Monday, at a debate aired live on KUOW and KING 5.


Earl Lancaster of Earl’s Cuts & Styles, used to be surrounded by other black-owned businesses, and a working-class community. Today, most of those businesses are gone.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Earl Lancaster has been cutting hair at the corner of 23rd and Union for a quarter of a century.

"Some of the highlights have been cutting some of the Sonics, Mariners. Cutting young kids and turn into fathers and cutting their kids’ hair. It’s been amazing," Lancaster said as he glided his clippers along a man's scalp.


Wallingford is one of several Seattle neighborhoods that will see an increase in affordable housing under the citywide rezone
Flickr Photo/Wonderlane (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/9jiSQm

The City of Seattle is planning a sweeping rezone of urban villages across the city to create more affordable housing. The public can weigh in now on a draft environmental study of the zoning changes.

Some people gathered outside of the UW Medical Center Wednesday to voice their concerns about the Campus Master Plan.
KUOW Photo/Angela Nhi Nguyen

The University of Washington has revealed a 10-year plan to expand its Seattle campus and some people are voicing their concerns about the effects it could have.

On Wednesday at Denny Park, former Mayor Mike McGinn revealed a new tax plan in the Seattle mayor's race
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Economic inequality is a top issue in this year's Seattle mayor’s race. On Wednesday, former Mayor Mike McGinn said he has a new tax plan to help fix that.

Dan Schiaffo's business card reads 'Laser Craftsman.' Tap/click on the image for more photos.
KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

It's a lot less expensive to live in Bremerton than on the Seattle side of Puget Sound. That's allowed many people to pursue their way of life. But housing costs have started to tick upward, and builders are redeveloping land where cheap rental housing used to be. The result: fewer cheap places around.

Homeless RV
Flickr Photo/A. Kwanten (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/Bv6MSo

Robert Loomis had a good job and had just signed a mortgage on a new home then he started having chest pains. This is his story.

Bill Radke speaks with Augustine Cita of the Urban League of Metropolitan Seattle and Sean Flynn, board president of the Rental Housing Association of Washington, to discuss the new Fair Chance Housing law proposed by Mayor Ed Murray. 

Brettler Family Place, part of the complex at Sand Point Housing
Solid Ground

Charleena Lyles lived in housing owned and operated by Solid Ground in Seattle's Magnuson Park. The nonprofit organization manages a campus with 175 housing units for people who have come through the experience of being homeless. Mike Buchman is the communications director at Solid Ground. He told Kim Malcolm that a neighborhood has been created at Sand Point for hundreds of people. 

Houses in Queen Anne
Flickr Photo/Harold Hollingsworth (CC BY-SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/9C1rMq

Bill Radke talks to Denise Rodriguez, the deputy director of Washington Homeownership Resource Center, and Skylar Olsen, a senior economist at Zillow, about what makes the Puget Sound real estate market so competitive and how people are able to find and afford housing. 

War boxes visible in a Bremerton alley.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Tiny, affordable houses line some of Bremerton’s alleys. They’re called “war boxes,” remnants of the massive building boom that transformed Bremerton during World War II.

Studying that boom and the housing it left behind offers clues on what it would take to truly meet our region's current housing needs.


Courtesy of Mithun Architects

A coalition of black community groups chose Juneteenth, or Freedom Day, for the ceremonial groundbreaking of a new affordable housing real estate project in Seattle's Central District.

June 19 is the day in 1865 when the abolition of slavery was announced in Texas.

Maggie Conyer of Strategy Real Estate shows what's for sale now. They're pretty good if you're from the Seattle side but getting up there if you're from Bremerton.
KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Bremerton is a place where people of many income levels live beside one another. It’s been that way for decades. People here were brought together by the military, and they could stay together because of low housing prices.

Downtown Bremerton.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Seattle is the fastest-growing city in the country, which means bad traffic and increasingly unaffordable housing.  

Where affordable housing could go in Seattle's Chinatown-International District
City of Seattle

Big changes for Seattle's Chinatown-International District are just one vote away. A Seattle City Council committee Tuesday passed zoning legislation to increase density in the historic neighborhood.

Based on requests from residents, though, the council is delaying its final vote on the matter.

File photo. apartment housing apt door
Flickr Photo/Matthew Piatt (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Bill Radke speaks with Jessa Lewis and Sean Flynn about a new lawsuit against the cap on move-in fees that was enacted in Seattle.

Flynn, the board president of landlord group Rental Housing Association that filed the suit, argues that the law harms smaller landlords, the last people in the city keeping housing reasonably affordable.

Lewis, the executive director of the Tenants Union of Washington state, claims that the caps are reasonable and these kinds of laws are all that allow people to still live in the city. 

Cassie Chinn is the Deputy Executive Director of the Wing Luke Museum and Tam Nguyen is the owner of Tamarind Tree in Chinatown-International District
KUOW Photo/ Amina Al-Sadi

Bill Radke talks to Cassie Chinn, deputy executive director of the Wing Luke Museum, and Tam Nguyen, the owner of Tamarind Tree, about how Chinatown-International District is changing and what might be lost as the area faces the pressure of new development.  

Housing in the Yesler Terrace area.
KUOW Photo/Dominic Black

A landlord group is suing the city of Seattle over a new law that caps move-in fees and allows renters to pay their deposit in installments over several months.

The ordinance was unanimously passed by the City Council in December and came into effect in January.

Tang Fung Chin was forced out of her apartment in Seattle's Chinatown-International District in 2015
KUOW Photo / David Hyde

Once again, residents are being forced out of Seattle’s Chinatown-International District. More than a century ago, a wave of anti-Chinese violence hit the West Coast. Hundreds of Chinese workers were made to leave Seattle by ship.

Then came World War II, when thousands of Japanese Americans were taken away.


Jeffrey Basket is fighting the foreclosure of his home in Auburn. He is among the people whose wages never fully recovered from the Great Recession.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

South King County has long been a destination for working people seeking home ownership.

But prices have been rising and not people's ability to pay.

Refugees who make it to the United States face new challenges: a new language, a new White House administration and, in Seattle, a tough rental market.

A man in Seatac is trying to soften the landing for others like him who’ve been resettled from the Democratic Republic of Congo.

The Seattle City Council has decided developers can build taller in pockets around the city. One that’s yet to be decided is a Vietnamese business district between “the Chinatown ID” and the Central District.

A year and a half ago, nearly 11,000 people in King County were living in homelessness. Zackary Tutwiler could have been one of them. But when that tally was taken, he had just gotten his own apartment.

Seattle's Chinatown-International District
Flickr Photo/Curtis Cronn (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/9hVGFD

Seattle officials are moving forward with plans to increase density in Chinatown-International District. It's the next in a series of neighborhoods undergoing a rezone. At a City Council meeting Tuesday, neighbors shared their concerns.

An example of a 400 square foot backyard cottage.
KUOW Photo/paintchipdiaries (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/CXL53

Seattle officials are taking another shot at regulating Airbnb, VRBO and other vacation rentals. City Councilmember Tim Burgess is proposing new rules after a similar plan last year attracted opposition from the rental industry.

A year ago, 1,400 people showed up for 110 affordable units on Beacon Hill.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Seattle officials are calling for improvements in how the city holds developers accountable. That’s because of a problem the Office of City Auditor found in how the city tracks new construction.

Flickr Photo/Steven Santiago (CC-BY-NC-ND)/https://flic.kr/p/q4dpg6

Downtown and South Lake Union are poised to get even denser. Seattle lawmakers have approved a rezone to increase the building heights for both neighborhoods. Mayor Ed Murray signed it into law on Friday, April 14.

A 1960s sign from an old flophouse in Pioneer Square in Seattle.
Flickr/Matthew Klein (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0) https://flic.kr/p/4PF4Bn

It’s not an easy time to find an apartment in Seattle. You’d be hard pressed to find a one-bedroom on Capitol Hill for less than $1,400 per month — and rents for similarly-sized apartments in swanky new buildings regularly soar upward of $3,000.

Pages