homelessness

KUOW/John Ryan photo

The Seattle City Council has approved spending $100,000 to support homeless camps next year, like the one that sprang up on a busy sidewalk in front of the University District post office in September. That camp has since moved to the parking lot of the University Congregational United Church of Christ a few blocks away.

Twenty men, women and children now make a home out of eight parking spaces.

Every day at noon, residents of the tent village that calls itself The Ave Foundation hold a meeting to work through problems and assign chores. They call it their "family meeting."

Santo Rodriguez says when he can't do his laundry or take a shower for a few days, people treat him differently, like refusing to sit next to him on the bus.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

The city budget for the next two years is coming together and it looks like a downtown facility for the homeless will get enough money to keep its doors open from early morning to late at night. 

It’s called the Urban Rest Stop and it’s a place where the people without a home can take showers, do their laundry and use the restroom (without having to buy a cup of coffee first). 

New Low-Barrier Shelter Takes Root in Olympia

Oct 31, 2014
Elizabeth Jenkins

On Saturday, a new, low-barrier shelter is opening in downtown Olympia. It’s the first of its kind in Washington to allow pets and to have special accommodations for gay, lesbian and transgender people.

Seattle.gov

Little surprises Knute Berger, writer and local historian, when it comes to Seattle history.

So when he discovered that Seattle had used chain gangs – ball and chain style – into the 1900s, he thought, “Chain gangs? That’s a Southern thing.”

Ross Reynolds speaks with KUOW reporter Carolyn Adolph about an unusual problem food banks are facing: too many cans, not enough can openers. The US government is buying five times more canned pink salmon than usual in order keep the price of salmon from falling too low. This helps support the fishing industry and the canned fish is eventually sent to food banks.

Jeannie Yandel talks with James Morone, an urban studies and political science professor at Brown University, about the growing pains of young cities. 

We also hear from Pat Gray of Kent Hope and Kent resident Gregg Haffner about the plans for a 24-hour homeless shelter in the city. 

Mobile Medical
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

About twice a month, King County’s Mobile Medical van comes to Renton. It opens at 4:30, but it’s often slow until closer to 6:30, when the church across the street begins serving hot meals for homeless people.

The inside of this RV has been retrofitted so there’s an exam room, a nurse’s station and a waiting area.  A generator gives off a droning buzz as it powers this efficient little clinic.

KUOW/John Ryan photo

A homeless camp has popped up on a busy sidewalk in Seattle’s University District. Members of the small tent community say 20 people live here.

homeless
Flickr Photo/~C4Chaos (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Once upon a time, Jeremy Bradford saw his life spread before him; years of infinite possibility.

The Seattle native had his life together. A successful stint in the Marines had led him to a sales career. Bradford was on an upward trajectory at one of the city's best-known department stores. 

Flickr Photo/Marcos Ojeda

Just east of Gas Works Park, there’s a road with a row of back-in parking spots. Some modern buildings have sprouted up here, but the winding street still feels like a road people drive through without stopping.

But for Jim Hogshire, this is home.

About a decade ago, Kris Kalberer left her job as a retail manager to raise her kids and care for her elderly mother. For a while, the family did well on her husband's income. Then he lost his job.

Their finances spiraled out of control. They lost their house in March 2011, and since then, their lives have become transient. They stayed in motels, or with friends. Currently they live in their car.

Flickr Photo/Blake Burkhart (Cc-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Bruce Stedman, Arlington's acting police chief, and Doug Honig, ACLU of Washington's communications director, about the city's strict new approach to panhandling.

Marcie Sillman talks to Alison Eisinger, director of the Coalition on Homelessness, about why local homeless advocacy groups are protesting the rejection of their application to convert the Old Federal Reserve building into a comprehensive homeless service center in downtown Seattle.

Flickr Photo/MDMA (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Steve Scher speaks with Susan Collins, a researcher in the University of Washington's Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Health, about a new intervention which combines an anti-craving drug with goal-setting talk therapy to reduce the negative consequences experienced by chronically homeless and alcohol-dependent adults, without necessarily requiring sobriety.

Homeless men and women in San Francisco have a new way of finding services such as food and shelter.

It’s an app — Link-SF — that links homeless people to available shelter, food, medical supplies, a place to bathe or use the computer.

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