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homeless

FAFSA form for student aid.
Flickr Photo/The Bent Tree (CC BY NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/4kSAPe

June is the month for college graduation, but for many homeless youth, college is beyond their grasp. The paperwork for college applications can be overwhelming and being homeless complicates that process.

When Clarissa Lunday applied for federal financial aid, she had to provide information about her homelessness. 


This week we're making it up as we go

May 27, 2016
'Week in Review' panel Sydney Brownstone, C.R. Douglas, Rob McKenna and Ron Sims.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Seattle's Mayor is combating the city's homeless problem by "making it up as we go." That means, in part, shutting down the homeless encampment known as the Jungle. So where will those people go?

And how did Bernie Sanders go from winning the caucus to losing the primary? 

We'll tackle these subjects and more on Week in Review.

Listen to the live discussion Friday at noon, join in by following @KUOW and using #KUOWwir. Audio and podcast for this show will be available at 3 p.m.

Many cats and dogs live as pets to residents of the Jungle, Seattle's notorious homeless encampment.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Members of Seattle’s City Council want to stop the mayor from clearing out the homeless encampment known as the Jungle.

A committee led by Councilmember Sally Bagshaw is introducing an alternative that would have the city wait until it can offer permanent housing to everyone there.


A camp area at the caves in the north part of the Jungle, Seattle's notorious homeless encampment that leapt onto the map after a fatal shooting in January.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Bill Radke speaks with Jordan Royer about his experience managing the Jungle in the early 2000s. Royer was in charge of dealing with the homeless camp under Interstate 5 under Seattle Mayor Greg Nickels. He said the city can manage the Jungle, but it most likely will never be able to truly shut it down. 

Homeless advocates gather outside Seattle Mayor Ed Murray's office.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Some homeless people and supporters are pushing back against plans to close the encampment under Interstate 5 known as the Jungle. They interrupted a Seattle City Council meeting this week and say they plan to keep fighting. 


The Union Gospel Mission works with Operation Nightwatch to fill up its spare beds at the end of the night.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

The doors at Operation Nightwatch open at 9 p.m. Homeless men and women – but mostly men – stream in and grab a hot meal.

Then they sit around. They look anxious. They’re waiting for beds.


Some residents of the Jungle keep tidy encampments, like William Kowang above, while others live in garbage with needles strewn about.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

It's the beginning of the end for the sprawling homeless camp under Interstate 5 known as the Jungle. 

This week, officials from the city of Seattle and Washington state unveiled a plan to clear out and clean up the Jungle.

Homeless families outside a shelter in downtown Seattle
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Bill Radke speaks with Dr. Maralyssa Bann of Harborview Medical Center about the challenges homeless people face managing chronic illnesses. 

Many cats and dogs live as pets to residents of the Jungle, Seattle's notorious homeless encampment.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Kim Malcolm speaks with Tim Harris, local advocate for the homeless and founder of the street paper Real Change, about the plan to clear out and clean up the Jungle. Harris says this plan will not help the residents of the Jungle, it will displace them. 

A homeless encampment in what the city calls the I-5 East Duwamish Greenbelt. It's unofficially known as The Jungle. But officials say they are preparing to move the people who live here.
City of Seattle Photo

State and Seattle officials have a plan for emptying out a two-mile stretch of homeless camps under Interstate 5 around Dearborn. It means the end of the area known as the Jungle.

Officials say the plan is to keep people from returning - without building a fence.


Carmen and Robert Patterson have lived in the Jungle, a homeless encampment in Seattle, on and off since 2011. They and several others who live in the Jungle shared photos, stories and text messages with us.
Courtesy of Robert Patterson

Robert Patterson lives in the Jungle, a homeless encampment. This is a transcript from his audio diary: 

Sunday is … Carmen and I try to make this our day that we don’t have to go anywhere. It’s a lazy day.


'Week in Review' panel Erica C. Barnett, Ross Reynolds, Gyasi Ross and Jonathan Martin.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Ever heard of Seattle's 20-year plan? We discuss why you should care about it.  And what kind of hope should we have for the new approach to the homeless encampment known as the Jungle? Also, as Sound Transit move towards a light-rail future, are they spending too much on the opening day festivities? What does it mean for Washington state now that the Army Corps of Engineers has put a stop to a new deep water terminal in Cherry Point? 

Ross Reynolds talks over the week's news with writer Erica C. Barnett, columnist Jonathan Martin and lawyer and activist Gyasi Ross.  

San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee is on a campaign to show that the city’s latest tools to combat homeless — its Navigation Centers — are producing results.

Over the last month, Lee has popped up for photo ops at these new shelters and the supportive housing units that go along with them. Behind the scenes, the city’s homeless czar, Sam Dodge, has been gathering data to build the case another way — with numbers.

Tents lined up in the Jungle, which extends north and south under Seattle's Interstate 5 corridor.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Almost nobody provides outreach and services in the Jungle, the homeless encampment under Interstate 5. Most city-funded outreach workers won't go there because of safety concerns. 

But that's about to change. The city of Seattle is planning what they're calling an intense period of outreach in the Jungle. 

Courtesy of New York Times/Evan McGlinn

Bill Radke speaks with Kirk Johnson, Seattle bureau chief at The New York Times, about the families he met while reporting a story on Mary's Place Guest Rooms, a new shelter for homeless families in South Lake Union.

Jon Meer of Light Under The Bridge is the outsider who comes to the Jungle most often.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Every day, social workers reach out to homeless people on the streets of Seattle. But there’s one place social workers seldom go: the Jungle.

That’s the notorious homeless encampment under Interstate 5 where there have been assaults, rapes and stabbings. Many outreach workers consider it too dangerous. But a few do enter the Jungle. 

Jacobo Miguel Pinon Jr. plays the harmonica at his space in the Jungle, a homeless encampment that houses more than 400 people by some estimates.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Bill Radke speaks with KUOW reporter Joshua McNichols about Seattle's homeless encampment known as the Jungle. They discuss what it's like in the Jungle and why we react to it the way we do. 

Tiny homes, which can be as little as 50 to 300 square feet, are growing in popularity as a solution for the homeless. In Chicago, advocates want to build tiny houses to serve a specific marginalized group — homeless youth, especially those who identify as LGBTQ.

Kara Bernstine, who is homeless, said she knows the Jungle homeless encampment isn't perfectly safe, but it felt safer than other places in the city. Click on this photo to see more images of the Jungle.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Most people think of the Jungle as a scary homeless camp, a no man’s land under the freeway near downtown Seattle.

It's about 6:30 in the morning at a Starbucks near Santa Monica beach, and David Rodriguez Ordunez is checking Facebook while charging his phone.

He's one of 44,000 people living on the streets in and around Los Angeles — and he's one of three homeless people at the coffee shop this morning.

"Since there's Internet here, that's mainly one of the purposes. I've usually got to find locations to actually have access," Ordunez explains.

Why Starbucks instead of the library? "Well, the library opens like at 10 o'clock or something," he says.

Charles Adkins, 18, is running to be a delegate for Bernie Sanders at the Democratic National Convention.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Just before Bernie Sanders took the stage at a packed Key Arena in March, the Seattle crowd heard a new voice in Washington state politics: Charles Adkins. 

He's a Native American high school student who used to be homeless. 

One of the 24 units for homeless youth at Phoenix Rising, a place for young adults ages 18-25 needing shelter and treatment for addiction.
KUOW Photo/Ruby de Luna

Homeless youth with substance abuse problems will have a place in King County to get help beginning this month.

Amazon plans to put offices next year in this former Travelodge in downtown Seattle. Until then, it will act as a shelter operated by Mary's Place.
Google Maps

Homeless families in Seattle will start moving into a building owned by Amazon on Monday.

The old downtown hotel is a plush space for a shelter, according to the nonprofit that will run it.

'Week in Review' panel Joni Balter, Michael Maddux, Kim Malcolm and John Carlson.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Amazon is donating a building a temporary homeless shelter in Seattle. What role should the business community play in solving homelessness? Also, the troubled Western State Hospital has a new CEO. Will that help solve it's problems? And, should Washington ditch the sales tax in favor of an income tax?

Kim Malcolm chats over the news of the week with Seattle Channel's Joni Balter, KVI's John Carlson and Michael Maddux, chair of the King County Young Democrats.

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray in the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Kim Malcolm talks to Seattle Mayor Ed Murray about Amazon's announcement that it will be turning one of its vacant South Lake Union buildings into a homeless shelter in partnership with Mary's Place. 

Amazon.com is under fire after an article from the New York Times lambasted its workplace atmosphere.
Flickr Photo/Robert Scoble (CC BY 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1Gnl1gl

Kim Malcolm speaks with Seattle Times Reporter Ángel González about Amazon's announcement that it will establish a temporary shelter for homeless families near their South Lake Union headquarters.

The online retail giant will partner with local homeless service provider Mary's Place to temporarily re-purpose an existing real estate holding — an empty Travelodge — while the land it sits on waits to be developed. The shelter will house around 60-70 homeless families for one year.

Red Square, University of Washington campus
Flickr Photo/Curtis Cronn (CC BY NC ND)/http://bit.ly/1QnEFc7

A homeless camp could be coming to University of Washington for 90 days during the winter of 2017. School officials will consider letting the group called SHARE set up a tent city on campus.

William Kowang lives in the area under I-5 known as "the Jungle."
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

The Washington State Department of Transportation has $1 million to spend on the Jungle, a homeless encampment in South Seattle where roughly 400 people live. The state Legislature approved the earmark late last week.

About 100 mattresses in the foreground as friends of SHARE prepare to camp outside the King County Administration Building.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Homeless people camped outside the King County Administration Building Thursday night, trying to draw attention to the closure of 15 shelters. 

The group that runs the shelters has money problems. They say the problem grew when King County shut off their funding last year.

Social workers Bradly Smith and Jackie St. Louis check in on Tonja Warner, who is homeless. Smith and St. Louis walk with cops on their beat and connect people they encounter with services.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

It’s early in the morning, and Capitol Hill’s homeless men and women are just waking up. 

Tanja Warner is curled up in her sleeping bag, sheltered under the roof overhang behind a business. It’s illegal to sleep here, a form of trespassing.

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