homeless | KUOW News and Information

homeless

Quixote Village: More Than Just A Place To Sleep

Mar 5, 2014
KUOW Photo/Elizabeth Jenkins

This past Christmas Eve, 30 homeless adults found a permanent residence in Olympia, Wash.

Before the move, the group lived in tents, hosted by different churches in the area. Many of the people had been sleeping in the woods and just wanted a safe place to stay.

Now, Camp Quixote is known as Quixote Village and comprises tiny houses for homeless adults. At 144 square feet, the homes are about the size of a one-car garage.

Research: One In 34 Students Homeless In Washington

Feb 28, 2014
Flickr Photo/Ed Yourdon (CC BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde talks with Katara Jordan, attorney with the Children and Youth Project of Columbia Legal Services, about a recent report from the state Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction. The report claimed there are more than 30,000 homeless students in the Washington state.

Flickr Photo/GerardStolk (CC BY-NC-ND)

"I would say 9 out of 10 people, when they see someone carrying two, three bags with them, they instantly peg them as homeless," Isaac Pace told Marcie Sillman on The Record.

Pace is a volunteer for SHARE, a homeless advocacy group in Seattle. He has also been without a permanent home for about 15 years.

Concerns Of A Homeless Student: Math, Graduation, Clean Clothes

Jan 7, 2014
KUOW Photo/Chris Otey

Growing up, Kyra MacFarlane survived on food banks and pawning items for a quick buck with her father and brothers. MacFarlane is one of 27,000 homeless students in Washington state.

Without permanent housing, MacFarlane has struggled with the basics, like hygiene.

KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

As snow dusted Seattle on Friday morning, demand for warm items shot up at a homeless camp in Seattle’s central area.

Helping Out During The Holidays

Dec 23, 2013

Steve Scher talks with Lauren McGowan, the associate director of ending homelessness at United Way of King County, about the services her organization provides over the holidays.

With Real Change News, Bellevue's Homeless Population Hidden No More

Nov 21, 2013
Flickr Photo/Chris Blakeley

Steve Scher talks with Alan Preston, managing director of Real Change News, about bringing the newspaper — which is sold by homeless people — to Bellevue.

KUOW Photo/Patricia Murphy

At a day shelter for homeless men in downtown Bellevue, Buddy McArdle was working hard trying to convince the men there to become vendors for Real Change.

Mayor Ed Murray has released new proposals to combat homelessness in Seattle.
Flickr Photo/Romi Chiorean (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Adrienne Quinn, the new director of the Department of Community and Human Services and member of the Committee to End Homelessness.

Olympia resident Ben Charles, of Crazy Faith Outreach, has been serving food to the homeless in an Olympia parking lot for nearly three years. Now the city has banned the group, citing public safety concerns.

Ben Charles and the Crazy Faith Outreach group have been  feeding homeless people in a parking lot in Olympia every Thursday evening. But now city official want them to shut it down. Ross Reynolds talks to Tom Hill, Olympia’s building official.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

More than 1,400 homeless individuals descended on Seattle Center Tuesday to take part in a one-day resource fair put on by United Way of King County.

KUOW Photo/Nick Danielson

Charles Royer served as Seattle's mayor from 1978 to 1990. During his tenure, Royer saw the historic neighborhood of Pioneer Square surge with violence as Seattle handled the crack epidemic. More than two decades after finishing his fourth term, Royer now lives and works in Pioneer Square. He told KUOW's Arwen Nicks his thoughts on the challenges currently facing the neighborhood and why he thinks the Alliance for Pioneer Square and the Downtown Seattle Association are good candidates to manage Occidental park, but not without help from the city.

Real Change vendor Mike Hall has been living in Pioneer Square for 15 years, and for the last 13 years he has stood at the corner of First and Main. Ross Reynolds spoke with Mike Hall about his experiences in Seattle's first neighborhood. 

Eddie Weber runs 11 clean and sober houses in Kent, Wash.  Five of those are full of sex offenders, which is a  problem according to the city of Kent. The city attorney has promised to start fining Weber $2,500 dollars a day – $500 for each house – because those houses violate the city’s zoning code.

Weber said Kent’s action is part of a larger trend where Draconian laws are enacted to drive sex offenders out of communities. Weber spoke to KUOW’s David Hyde.

Produced by Joshua McNichols.

Homelessness, Pigeons And Life After Injury

Aug 29, 2013

No Home To Go To: Stories From The Homeless And Poor

As many as 3.5 million people in the United States experience homelessness in a given year. We'll hear a few personal stories about homelessness. In 2007, Steve Scher talked with Lisa Gray-Garcia (aka Tiny), journalist, poet and founder of POOR Magazine and the Poor News Network, Neal Lampi, who was living in a transitional housing program, and Renee Gebre, then living at Seattle Union Gospel Mission’s Women and Children’s Shelter.
 

Pigeons: Rats With Wings Or Symbols Of Peace?

The pigeon used to be considered a symbol of peace and fertility. The birds were also a critical component of wartime communication. Yet, now people often consider them rats with wings. Steve Scher talks with Andrew Blechman, an award-winning journalist and author of “Pigeons: The Fascinating Saga of the World’s Most Revered and Reviled Bird,” as well as Dave Cheney from National Bird Control.

Life After Injury: Stories From American Soldiers

Thousands of American soldiers have served in Iraq and Afghanistan during the last decade. Many suffered physical injury as a result. Today we hear first hand stories from members of our military. Steve Scher talked with Lt. John Arthur, Capt. Jeremy McGuffey and Sgt. Christopher Hoyt about life after injury and coming home from war.

Nickelsville Resident Speaks Out About Move

Aug 6, 2013
KUOW Photo/Jenna Montgomery

The homeless encampment known as Nickelsville is set to close on September 1st. The city has provided $500,000 to move residents to new homes. But are these new shelters a permanent solution? Nickelsville resident John Jolly says no. He talks to Ross Reynolds about how the transition is going.

Seattle's Nickelsville Residents Try To Find New Homes

Aug 2, 2013

The homeless encampment known as Nickelsville is set to close on September 1. The city voted down legislation to expand areas for similar homeless campsites. But the City Council has provided $500,000 to relocate Nickelsville residents into permanent shelters and emergency housing.

Mike Johnson is special projects director for Seattle's Union Gospel Mission and he's working on the resettlement of Nickelsville residents. He tells Ross Reynolds about how the move is going.

Homeless Encampments: A Necessary Evil?

Aug 1, 2013
Flickr Photo/Wendy Johnson

On Monday the Seattle City Council voted against legislation to expand homeless camp sites, like Nickelsville and Tent City. Reverend Sandy Brown was a founding member of the Committee to End Homelessness in King County. He explains to Ross Reynolds why tent encampments are not a solution, but still necessary.

Flickr Photo/javacolleen

The Seattle City Council voted unanimously Monday to spend $500,000 to relocate residents of the south Seattle tent city called "Nickelsville." The council has given residents of Nickelsville until September 1, 2013 to move out or be evicted.

KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Every year, hundreds of refugees come to Washington state to escape persecution, conflict or violence in their home countries. Washington consistently ranks as one of the top 10 states for new arrivals.

Many families come here after waiting long stretches in a refugee camp where food, water and shelter is a daily concern. Yet once they have resettled in the Seattle area, their struggles are often far from over. Some agencies that work with refugees in King County say they’ve seen an alarming rise in homelessness within this population of newcomers but they’re stymied by how to measure the increase.

Seattle Street Newspaper Real Change Raises Price

Apr 4, 2013
Sara Lerner

The weekly newspaper Real Change provides an outlet for hundreds of people who are low-income and homeless to make money and hold a steady job. On Wednesday, the paper doubled its price from $1 to $2.  

The Public Property Security Problem In Nickelsville

Mar 26, 2013
Flickr Photo/Beyond Neon

For almost 2 years the homeless camp known as Nickelsville has been located in West Seattle. Mayor Mike McGinn has not approved the camp but has said that he has no plan to evict the camp either. Well, the unsanctioned camp that is normally relatively quiet is causing a bit of a stir this last week.

Meghan Walker

A local organization is trying to address the growing need for homeless facilities in Ballard. The Low-Income Housing Institute (LIHI) wants to build a hygiene facility, known as an Urban Rest Stop, on the ground floor of a senior housing facility that’s being built. The development is in the middle of a residential neighborhood next to the Ballard Library and this has some residents concerned.

Ed Yourdon / Flickr

In the pre-dawn hours this Friday, hundreds of volunteers will fan out across King County to look for people sleeping in alleys, parks, shopping centers and city busses. The effort  is part of the county’s annual One Night Count, which aims to get an annual head-count of people who are homeless.

Sheri Collins and her dog
Liz Jones

On Sunday nights, you can find Graham Pruss under the Ballard Bridge, serving up a hot meal. A recent menu included ham and potato soup, locally baked bread and apple cobbler. He calls this weekly dinner a bridge to connect with people who live in their cars. They’re often referred to as car campers or mobile homeless, but Pruss prefers the term, vehicle residents.

Pruss is one of many homeless advocates who’s pushed Seattle to provide more services to this group of people. In response, last year the city launched the “safe parking” program, which opens up church lots where people can park and connect to housing services. The pilot program is modestly increasing this year, in a step toward what advocates hope will be a citywide expansion. 

Giving To Panhandlers

Dec 27, 2012
Panhandler holds sign in front of Pike Place Market. Sign reads "My father was killed by ninjas. Need money for karate lessons."
flickr/Kdt

To give or not to give? That's the question many of us face when encountering panhandlers on Seattle's sidewalks. Some people make up their minds about how to act and don't deviate from the script. For others, the ethical questions resurface with every encounter.

Now, it seems we're at a crossroads. Many people are still out of work. Yet social services will probably be cut even further next year. Will that change how you give?

Amy Radil

The holidays often bring extra presents and messages from loved ones. But to receive those messages, you have to have an address.

Anyone who needs a mailing address can have the mail sent to 77 South Washington St. in Seattle's Pioneer Square. That’s the post office run by the Compass Housing Alliance. Most of the 3,500 people in Seattle who use that address are homeless or in temporary housing.

Teen Kicked Out Of His House At Age Seventeen

Dec 18, 2012

It started with an argument.

Marcus McGuire, 17, asked his mom if his girlfriend could come over to the house. His mom said no and Marcus remembers his mom referring to his girlfriend as a "broad."

Marcus says he snapped.

He started yelling and before long it was World War III. Marcus's mom eventually kicked him out of the house.

Phyllis Fletcher / KUOW Photo

It’s estimated that in King County, around 700 people under the age of 25 don’t have permanent housing. Among adolescents in general, LGBTQ youths are more vulnerable to health and psychological problems than heterosexual youths. Many are victims of parental physical abuse, turn to substance abuse, and have both mental and general physical health problems.

Ross Reynolds sits down with three people currently living without permanent housing to talk about what issues they have had to deal with as homeless youth.

Homeless Mom: It Costs $700 A Month To Live In A Van

Sep 13, 2012
The back of Elizabeth Jay's Dodge Ram minivan is cluttered with her clothes and supplies because the van is her living room and bedroom.
KUOW Photo/Sarah Rosenthal

When Elizabeth Jay tallies up her living expenses each month, they come to about $700. That doesn't include rent, because Jay is homeless: she lives in her van.

Pages