history

50 Years Later
3:13 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

How Kennedy's Assassination Changed The Secret Service

The limousine carrying President John F. Kennedy races toward the hospital after he was shot in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963, with Secret Service agent Clint Hill riding on the back.
Justin Newman AP

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 7:45 am

Nov. 22 will mark the 50th anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in Dallas, a moment that left an indelible mark on those who remember it.

It also permanently changed the agency charged with protecting the president — the U.S. Secret Service.

Looking back at the images of Kennedy, first lady Jackie Kennedy, Texas Gov. John Connally and his wife waving as they rode through the streets of Dallas in an open Lincoln, it all looks terribly innocent and naive.

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Author Interview
2:59 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

Why Haven't We Heard Of Ben Franklin's Sister?

Jill Lepore's "Book of Ages."

David Hyde talks with author Jill Lepore about "Book Of Ages: The Life and Opinions of Jane Franklin," an account of Benjamin Franklin's younger sister.

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History
2:31 pm
Fri November 1, 2013

Don't Blame The Farmers: The Real Story Behind Daylight Saving Time

Michael Downing's book "Spring Forward."

Marcie Sillman gets the story of daylight saving time from Michael Downing, the author of "Spring Forward: The Annual Madness of Daylight Saving Time." Its start was due to the lobbying of retailers in opposition of US farmers.

Cold War Legacy
6:00 am
Wed October 23, 2013

Boeing Engineer Reveals Secrets Behind Cold War Missile Program

Retired engineer Dan Witmer stands by a defunct Minuteman missile silo where he used to work in the 1960s. The silo is located just off East Marginal Way, across the street from the Museum of Flight.
Credit KUOW Photo/Sarah Waller

There’s a mysterious object standing in a parking lot just eight miles south of downtown Seattle. From the surface, it looks like a grayish-green dome on a pile of rubble. But dig a little deeper and you’ll discover a forgotten link to Seattle’s Cold War past. 

Retired Boeing engineer Dan Witmer is one of the few remaining people in Seattle who knows what that dome is covering up: a defunct Minuteman missile silo.

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Presidential History
9:00 pm
Thu October 10, 2013

50th Anniversary Of JFK’s Assassination With Dean R. Owen

Dean R. Owen's book "November 22, 1963: Reflections on the Life, Assassination, and Legacy of John F. Kennedy"

November 22 marks the 50th anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. Journalist Dean R. Owen collected interviews from notable civil rights leaders, White House staff and others connected to Kennedy for his book, “November 22, 1963: Reflections on the Life, Assassination, and Legacy of John F. Kennedy.”

Owen spoke at the Elliott Bay Book Company on September 14, 2013. He was joined by Patricia Baillargeon, a contributor to his book who served as assistant to Eleanor Roosevelt.

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Pop Culture
12:56 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

The '80s: More Complicated Than They Appear On TV

From "Happy Days" to "That '70s Show," TV writers love to tap into viewer nostalgia. This week ABC premieres "The Goldbergs" about a middle-class family living "in a simpler time called the '80s."

But Princeton University history professor Julian Zelizer says that suburban America during the Reagan years was anything but simple. He talks with David Hyde about the political changes that took place outside the home and continue to shape us today.

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1:00 pm
Wed September 25, 2013

The Invention Of "Jaywalking"

Lead in text: 
The show "99% Invisible" explores how the auto industry promoted the word "jaywalking" in order to shift the blame for traffic accidents on irresponsible pedestrians.
On the streets of early 20th Century America, nothing moved faster than 10 miles per hour. Responsible parents would tell their children, "Go outside, and play in the streets. All day." And then the automobile happened. And then automobiles began killing thousands of children, every year.
Energy
12:43 am
Wed September 25, 2013

Proposed Power Lines Tangle With Native American History

Four humanlike figures were painted in a cave in Washington hundreds or even thousands of years ago.
Colin Fogarty Northwest News Network

Originally published on Wed September 25, 2013 3:25 am

Imagine running power lines through a cathedral. That's how archaeologists describe what the Bonneville Power Administration proposes doing in the Columbia River Gorge in Washington state. The federal electricity provider is trying to string a new transmission line near a cave that contains ancient paintings, a site considered sacred by Native Americans.

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Controversy And Competition
10:46 am
Tue September 17, 2013

There She Is: The History Of Miss America

The newly crowned Miss America, Nina Davuluri, who received her title on September 15.
AP Photo/Julio Cortez

Last Sunday Miss New York Nina Davuluri, 24, was crowned Miss America. She is the first winner of Indian descent and proudly displayed her heritage with a classical Bollywood fusion dance as her talent.

Controversy followed the coronation, as Twitter exploded with racist remarks condemning her victory. The online viewer poll favored Miss Kansas: the blonde soldier with the "Serenity Prayer" down her side.

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Audio Postcard
2:55 pm
Mon September 16, 2013

Volunteers Restore Historic Jet In Everett

A DeHavilland Comet is undergoing restoration in Everett.
KUOW Photo/Sarah Waller

Volunteers at the Museum of Flight Restoration Center in Everett have been working diligently since 1995 to restore one of the last DeHavilland Comets. The Comet was the world’s first commercial jetliner, and its body shape inspired the jets of today.

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Navy Headquarters
10:00 am
Mon September 16, 2013

Washington Navy Yard, Site Of Shooting, Has Long History

King George VI and Queen Elizabeth arrive at the Washington Navy Yard on June 9, 1939, to join President Franklin Roosevelt on a cruise down the Potomac River to Mount Vernon, Va.
AP

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 5:10 am

The sprawling Washington Navy Yard, scene of a deadly shooting Monday, is the Navy's oldest shore establishment and has long been considered the "ceremonial gateway" to the nation's capital.

The yard went into operation at the turn of the 19th century. Today, it employs thousands of people and is regarded as the "quarterdeck of the Navy" for its role as headquarters for the Naval District Washington.

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Corporal Punishment
7:12 am
Fri September 13, 2013

Hanging Up The Paddle: 20 Years Since Washington Banned Corporal Punishment In Public Schools

Credit Sarah Waller

Did you grow up in a school that allowed paddling?  Maybe you knew someone who was hit in school – or maybe the idea of corporal punishment seems as antiquated as ink wells.  This year marks the 20th anniversary of Washington’s state-wide ban on corporal punishment in public schools.

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Railroad History
9:28 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Former Northwest Railroad Town Struggles To Keep Last 25 People

Jessica Robinson Northwest News Network

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 6:05 pm

Take a drive down any highway in the Northwest, and you'll pass signs for dozens of small towns. There are more than 700 cities under 10,000 people in Washington, Oregon and Idaho. Many of these towns came about because of railroads or timber or mines and now they’re trying to figure out what comes next.

It's nearly 2:15 in Avery, Idaho. The mail has arrived. And the post office is about to become the busiest place in town.

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Strange Language
11:18 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Ben Zimmer On Having And Eating Cake

Flickr Photo/Jeff Anderson

You can’t have your cake and eat it too, but how are you supposed to eat cake you don’t have? Language guru Ben Zimmer is back today and he explains the whole having, eating and not having cake thing. And what that has to do with how the Unabomber was captured. Really.

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Occidental Square
9:41 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Live From Pioneer Square: The Washington Shoe Building

Two of Seattle's tallest: Columbia Center on the left and Smith Tower on the right. Also, featuring Seattle cloud cover. Ah, summer in Seattle.
Credit KUOW Photo/Nick Danielson

The Record on KUOW will broadcast live from the Washington Shoe Building on Occidental Square (410 Occidental Way South), Friday, from noon to 2 p.m. If you live or work in Pioneer Square, come by and tell us about your neighborhood. We’ll explore its demographics, history and how it’s changed in the past 20 years.

Highlights From The KUOW Booth


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