history

Cherie LaMaine is a ferry walker on the Edmonds-Kingston line: She makes laps around the deck as the boat glides from port to port.

The habit started with her husband when he needed to make frequent trips to Swedish Hospital. “We would still walk, holding hands,” LaMaine said. “He couldn't walk too fast, but it was great.”

David McCullough On Constructing '1776'

Feb 17, 2014

Steve Scher talks with acclaimed historian David McCullough about his new book, "1776." To construct the story on the Revolutionary War, McCullough used an array of source materials, including hundreds of letters written by George Washington and the diaries of 70 different participants in the war.

This interview originally aired on June 16, 2005.

Harry Truman and Herbert Hoover were from opposing parties, but they became friends when Truman took office after Franklin Roosevelt's death and needed some advice. This was the start of the 'presidents club,' a shadow organization that began as a joke. These private relationships — and rivalries — among the most powerful men in the country are documented in Nancy Gibbs and Michael Duffy's book "The Presidents Club: Inside the World's Most Exclusive Fraternity."

Gibbs and Duffy trace the evolution of the presidents club from the end of World War II to Barack Obama. They spoke at Seattle's Town Hall on May 11, 2012.

This interview originally aired on September 6, 2012.

The tusk from a mammoth that lived 16,000 years ago in the Seattle area unearthed earlier this week appears to be the largest, most intact ever found in the region.

It's thought to be from a Columbian mammoth, a subgroup of woolly mammoths, and is considered to be a pretty rare find. Construction workers stumbled on it as they were digging the foundation for an apartment complex in the city's South Lake Union neighborhood.

David Hyde talks with journalist and author Annie Jacobsen's latest book "Operation Paperclip: The Secret Intelligence Program that Brought Nazi Scientists to America." The book is the account of more than a dozen German scientists recruited by the U.S. government after WWII.

In 1931, Asotin County Sheriff John Wormell was shot and killed by a 12-year-old boy. Herbert Niccolls, Jr., was almost hung by a lynch mob before he was sentenced to life in prison.

Journalist Nancy Bartley is the author of “The Boy Who Shot the Sheriff: The Redemption of Herbert Niccolls, Jr.” The book reveals Niccolls’ troubled past and early Washington state history. She spoke at the Elliott Bay Book Company on January 7.

Marcie Sillman talks with Tim Ford, lawyer and former president of Washington Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers, about how Washington state has used the death penalty in the past.

Iran on Tuesday marked the 35th anniversary of its Islamic revolution, a day when the country's religious conservatives and military hard-liners take center stage, and calls of "Death to America" echo across the country.

In Tehran's Azadi Square, one man waving an orange "Down with the USA" flag condemned the U.S. and Israel, and then, perhaps not sure of the nationality of the reporter standing nearby, threw in England and France for good measure.

Seattle City Council

For all of Seattle's economic and population growth in the past few decades, its city limits have remained static. That could change after the City Council advanced a plan Monday to expand Seattle's boundaries for the first time since the mid-1980s.

David Hyde visits the basement of Burke Museum to speak with geology writer David Williams about the historical artifacts that have been unearthed by Seattle's relentless earth moving.

Inside The Real American War In Vietnam

Feb 6, 2014

Steve Scher talks with author Nick Turse about his book "Kill Anything That Moves: The Real American War in Vietnam." It is about a detailed account of the widespread sanctioned killings that took place during the Vietnam War.

Ross Reynolds talks with Kathleen Taylor, executive director of the ACLU of Washington, about her long career advocating for civil liberties and free speech.

Legacy Of Forced March Still Haunts Navajo Nation

Jan 27, 2014

Musician Clarence Clearwater, like so many Navajos, has moved off the reservation for work. He performs on the Grand Canyon Railway, the lone Indian among dozens of cowboys and train robbers entertaining tourists.

"I always tell people I'm there to temper the cowboys," says Clearwater. "I'm there to give people the knowledge that there was more of the West than just cowboys."

Flickr Photo/samaja

One of the most popular characters in literature, stage, film and television started with a struggling doctor trying to put food on the table.

In 1887, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, selling stories to magazines and papers as a side profession, introduced a detective and doctor duo in “The Mystery of Uncle Jeremy’s Household” – a prototype that would later become the ubiquitous Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson in “A Study in Scarlet” and an entire canon that followed.

The History Of Revenge Politics

Jan 10, 2014

David Hyde gets some historical perspective on revenge politics from Kenneth C. Davis, historian and author of "Don't Know Much About History," in light of the New Jersey Governor Chris Christie's recent traffic scandal.

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