history

Flickr Photo/Seattle Municipal Archives

He is the reason fish fly at the Pike Place Market, or so the story goes.

On Sunday, Paul Schell, a former Seattle mayor and champion of urban neighborhoods, died. He was 76.

A spokeswoman for Mayor Ed Murray confirmed that Schell died at Swedish Hospital.

Flickr Photo/Metro Theatre Vancouver (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Jeannie Yandel talks to Josephine Lee, English and Asian American studies professor at the University of Minnesota, about the checkered history of the Gilbert and Sullivan's "The Mikado."

Ross Reynolds talks to Redmond Barnett, head of the exhibits department for the Washington State Historical Society, about what happened the last time the state lifted prohibition.

The menus of millennia past can be tough to crack, especially when it comes to fruits and vegetables. For archaeologists studying a prehistoric site in Sudan, dental plaque provided a hint.

"When you eat, you get this kind of film of dental plaque over your teeth," says Karen Hardy, an archaeologist with the Catalan Institute for Research and Advanced Studies at the Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona.

Ross Reynolds talks with Ilan Stavans about his new book, “A Most Imperfect Union: A Contrarian History of the United States."

On this day in 1789, crowds stormed the Bastille prison, where the king kept his enemies. The monarchy was overthrown in a revolution.

David Hyde talks with author Susan Jacoby about her new book, "The Great Agnostic: Robert Ingersoll and American Freethought," the story of a historic figure for the separation of church and state.

Marcie Sillman talks with University of Washington professor Joe Janes about the original rules of soccer, published in 1863.

Marcie Sillman talks with Georgetown law professor Lisa Heinzerling about the history of the Environmental Protection Agency, and the change of its scope over time. 

David Hyde talks to Alex Beam about his new book "American Crucifixion: The Murder of Joseph Smith and The Fate of The Modern Church."

From Wikipedia

In 1932, a new singing style was emerging: crooning. What we might consider easy listening now wasn't necessarily received cordially by its contemporaries. Cardinal O'Connell of Boston described it as "imbecile slush" and "a degenerate form of singing.”

The Night A Fire Silenced KOMO's Airwaves

Jul 2, 2014
Credit Wikimedia Commons

On the night of Thursday, July 2, 2009, the 4th of July weekend was underway.

KUOW Photo/Ross Reynolds

While visiting Germany for a journalism fellowship, KUOW’s Ross Reynolds reports on what's changed and what's stayed the same in the 25 years since the fall of the Berlin Wall.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

People from around the world are in Sarajevo this week to mark 100 years since the gunshot that changed history. On June 28, 1914, a young assassin killed Archduke Franz Ferdinand, triggering the First World War. Bosnia is hosting concerts, conferences and art exhibitions to mark the centenary. NPR's Ari Shapiro reports from Sarajevo on what locals make of the big commemoration.

Mark Bradley's book "A Very Principled Boy.'

David Hyde talks to author Mark Bradley about his book, "A Very Principled Boy." It's the story of Duncan Lee, who became a spy for the Soviet Union only to switch allegiance back to the United States later in his life.

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