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Peanuts: From Hog Food To Gourmet Spread

Mar 6, 2014
Jon Krampner's book "Creamy and Crunchy."

Steve Scher talks with Jon Krampner, author of "Creamy and Crunchy: An Informal History of Peanut Butter, the All-American Food," about how peanuts went from hog food to the organic peanut butter that we spend $8 on today.

Courtesy of Museum of History & Industry

Historians point to the early months of 1852 as the time that downtown Seattle was founded. One Sunday in late winter of that year, members of the Denny Party, a group of settlers from Illinois who’d arrived at Alki a few months earlier, paddled across Elliott Bay.

You can listen to plenty of actors performing the works of William Shakespeare. But imagine if you could hear the voice of the young playwright himself — or the older one, for that matter — reading his own writing aloud.

Well, we can't take you back that far. But in the early 1960s, when recorded readings by authors were rare, a young couple in Boston decided to be literary audio pioneers.

Today, Paris is a city of light and romance, full of broad avenues, picturesque bridges and countless tourists visiting to soak in its charms.

Why Everyone Wants A Piece Of Crimea

Mar 4, 2014
Flickr Photo/Christiaan Triebert (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman speaks with Scott Radnitz, about how Crimea's history has influenced the current crisis in Ukraine. Radnitz is an associate professor in the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies at the University of Washington.

When Actors Were The Anchors

Mar 4, 2014
YouTube

Modern moviegoers are used to experiencing trailers, concession advertisements and, of course, a reminder to turn off their cell phone before the main attraction hits the screen.

But it wasn’t always that way. Until the 1950s, you got a good dose of news before you escaped into a Hollywood fantasyland. Beginning in 1935, “The March of Time” started replacing silent news reels in movie theaters, and it was a welcome change.

Susan Beilby Magee's book "Into The Light."

Marcie Sillman talks with Susan Beilby Magee about her book "Into The Light."

The book is about the emotional and artistic journey of artist Kalman Aron. He's painted portraits of everyone from Ronald Reagan to André Previn. He is also a survivor of the Holocaust, and he tells his story and shares his art with Magee.      

Flickr Photo/Ted of DGAR (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Harvard geneticist George Church about reviving extinct species.

Rather than trying to clone mammoths, scientists are taking their DNA and analyzing them in hopes of producing an Asian elephant that looks and behaves just like its extinct ancestor.

Steve McQueen's film "12 Years a Slave" is nominated for nine Academy Awards.

The 86th annual Academy Awards is this Sunday, and one of the films expected to take home the Oscar is Steve McQueen’s “12 Years a Slave.”

KUOW Photo/Ruby de Luna

Scientists are hoping to learn more about a fossilized mammoth tusk that was uncovered two weeks ago at a construction site in Seattle’s South Lake Union area. The tusk has since been transferred to the Burke Museum for preservation and research.

Flickr Photo/ Cloganese (CC BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds sits down with Marsha Botzer, founder of the Ingersoll Gender Center, to discuss her work in the Puget Sound LGBTQ community. They also talk about MOHAI's new exhibit Revealing Queer with the co-curator Erin Bailey.

AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky

Ross Reynolds talks with associate professor Scott Radnitz about the growing tension in Ukraine and why there has been a rise in violence. Radnitz explains how the situation in Ukraine differs from the other post-Soviet countries.

Paying Homage To The Monarch Apartments

Feb 20, 2014

Steve Scher talks with Jake Uitti and Caleb Thompson, editors of The Monarch Review, about the significance of the Monarch Apartments in Seattle. It has housed many local artists, writers and musicians over the years. Uitti and Thompson started the publication to support the artists' community and pay homage to the 109-year-old crumbling building.

Two teams want to re-enact Evel Knievel's famous jump over the Snake River Canyon in Idaho.

More than 70 years ago Wednesday, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed an executive order that led to the internment of more than 110,000 Japanese-Americans during World War II.

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