history

Women today breathe a little easier — thanks to a World War I metal shortage.

Before then, women squeezed themselves into corsets that molded their figures to fit the Victorian ideal: a voluptuous bosom atop a teensy waist. But since corset frames were mostly made of metal, which was needed for ammunition and other military supplies, the U.S. War Industries Board asked American women in 1917 to stop buying them. Around the same time, the modern-day bra emerged, freeing up wartime steel and women alike.

Flickr Photo/Seattle Munincipal Archives (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds speaks with James Gregory, director of the Seattle Civil Rights and Labor History Project at the University of Washington, about the history of racial exclusion in early 20th century housing covenants.

This segment originally aired May 21, 2014.

Flickr Photo/Seattle Municipal Archives (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Historylink’s Alan Stein about Seattle celebrations before Seafair, including the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Expo of 1909 and the Golden Potlatch. They discuss riots, gold and raffling off a baby.

Flickr Photo/Adam Fagen (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks to Michael Waldman about his new book "The Second Amendment: A Biography." Gun control has been a hot topic for years and the debate will play out in Washington this November in the form of two rival initiatives on guns. 

Waldman, president of the Brennan Center for Justice at the NYU School of Law, says for decades of American history the Second Amendment was a non-issue. 

Credit Wikimedia Commons

Ross Reynolds talks with Tim Egan, columnist for the New York Times, about the Devil's Broom fire in 1910. The conflagration was the largest in United States history, burning 3 million acres in the Pacific Northwest, and set the stage for modern firefighting.

Every summer thousands of interns flood the offices of Capitol Hill. One of their primary duties is to give constituents tours of the famous buildings. They parade visitors from the rotunda to statuary hall, offering stories and anecdotes.

But while these intern tours provide a great deal of information, they are sometimes a little short on actual history.

Ross Reynolds talks with Seattle Chamber of Commerce Acting CEO Maud Daudon about former Seattle Mayor Paul Schell. Daudon served as deputy mayor and chief of staff under Schell from 1998 to 2001. In addition, Ross discusses Schell’s legacy with David Brewster, founder of the Seattle Weekly, who was a personal friend. Schell died Sunday at the age of 76.

Memories Of Exclusion Inspire Seattle Architect's Work

Jul 28, 2014
AP Photo/Charles Dharapak

Seattle architect Johnpaul Jones will receive the National Humanities Medal from President Barack Obama on Monday. The White House says he will be the second Native American to receive the medal.

Flickr Photo/Seattle Municipal Archives

He is the reason fish fly at the Pike Place Market, or so the story goes.

On Sunday, Paul Schell, a former Seattle mayor and champion of urban neighborhoods, died. He was 76.

A spokeswoman for Mayor Ed Murray confirmed that Schell died at Swedish Hospital.

Flickr Photo/Metro Theatre Vancouver (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Jeannie Yandel talks to Josephine Lee, English and Asian American studies professor at the University of Minnesota, about the checkered history of the Gilbert and Sullivan's "The Mikado."

Ross Reynolds talks to Redmond Barnett, head of the exhibits department for the Washington State Historical Society, about what happened the last time the state lifted prohibition.

The menus of millennia past can be tough to crack, especially when it comes to fruits and vegetables. For archaeologists studying a prehistoric site in Sudan, dental plaque provided a hint.

"When you eat, you get this kind of film of dental plaque over your teeth," says Karen Hardy, an archaeologist with the Catalan Institute for Research and Advanced Studies at the Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona.

Ross Reynolds talks with Ilan Stavans about his new book, “A Most Imperfect Union: A Contrarian History of the United States."

On this day in 1789, crowds stormed the Bastille prison, where the king kept his enemies. The monarchy was overthrown in a revolution.

David Hyde talks with author Susan Jacoby about her new book, "The Great Agnostic: Robert Ingersoll and American Freethought," the story of a historic figure for the separation of church and state.

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