history

Annexation
8:18 am
Tue February 11, 2014

Seattle City Limits May Change For First Time In Decades

If a county review board and voters agree, these sections of unincorporated South Park will become part of Seattle.
Credit Seattle City Council

For all of Seattle's economic and population growth in the past few decades, its city limits have remained static. That could change after the City Council advanced a plan Monday to expand Seattle's boundaries for the first time since the mid-1980s.

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History
2:40 pm
Fri February 7, 2014

Buried Treasure: Burke Museum On What's Ahead For Bertha

This Rainier bottle from the Seattle Brewing & Malting Co. was excavated during an archaeological survey in preparation for Bertha.
Courtesy of Burke Museum

David Hyde visits the basement of Burke Museum to speak with geology writer David Williams about the historical artifacts that have been unearthed by Seattle's relentless earth moving.

Author Interview
2:59 pm
Thu February 6, 2014

Inside The Real American War In Vietnam

Nick Turse's book "Kill Anything That Moves."

Steve Scher talks with author Nick Turse about his book "Kill Anything That Moves: The Real American War in Vietnam." It is about a detailed account of the widespread sanctioned killings that took place during the Vietnam War.

Civil Liberties
4:12 pm
Mon February 3, 2014

Washington ACLU Director Reflects On 37-Year Career

ACLU of Washington's Kathleen Taylor has served as the executive director since 1980.
Flickr Photo/javacolleen

Ross Reynolds talks with Kathleen Taylor, executive director of the ACLU of Washington, about her long career advocating for civil liberties and free speech.

Lunar New Year
2:46 pm
Fri January 31, 2014

The Year Of The Horse: It's Up To You

According to the zodiac calendar, 2014 is the Year of the Horse.
KUOW Photo/Akiko Oda

David Hyde talks with Belinda Louie, vice president of Tacoma's Asia Pacific Cultural Center, about the Year of the Horse and the origin of the zodiac calendar.

The Long Walk
12:32 am
Mon January 27, 2014

Legacy Of Forced March Still Haunts Navajo Nation

A portion of Navajo artist Shonto Begay's mural depicting the Long Walk.
The Bosque Redondo Memorial/Shonto Begay

Originally published on Mon January 27, 2014 8:54 am

Musician Clarence Clearwater, like so many Navajos, has moved off the reservation for work. He performs on the Grand Canyon Railway, the lone Indian among dozens of cowboys and train robbers entertaining tourists.

"I always tell people I'm there to temper the cowboys," says Clearwater. "I'm there to give people the knowledge that there was more of the West than just cowboys."

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Arts And Literature
1:54 pm
Wed January 22, 2014

Why Sherlock Holmes Keeps Coming Back

Sherlock Holmes, has been immortalized in a number of ways, including this statue at the Baker Street Station for the London Underground.
Credit Flickr Photo/samaja

One of the most popular characters in literature, stage, film and television started with a struggling doctor trying to put food on the table.

In 1887, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, selling stories to magazines and papers as a side profession, introduced a detective and doctor duo in “The Mystery of Uncle Jeremy’s Household” – a prototype that would later become the ubiquitous Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson in “A Study in Scarlet” and an entire canon that followed.

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Bridge Scandal
3:16 pm
Fri January 10, 2014

The History Of Revenge Politics

George Washington Bridge, which connects New York with Fort Lee.
Flickr Photo/Wally Gobetz

David Hyde gets some historical perspective on revenge politics from Kenneth C. Davis, historian and author of "Don't Know Much About History," in light of the New Jersey Governor Chris Christie's recent traffic scandal.

Literary Controversy
3:30 pm
Thu January 9, 2014

Fifty Years After ‘Eichmann In Jerusalem’ With Seyla Benhabib

Hannah Arendt's book "Eichmann in Jerusalem," which was one of the most controversial books of the last century.

In 1963, one of the most controversial books of the twentieth century was published. “Eichmann in Jerusalem” presented Adolf Eichmann not as a sociopath — but as an ordinary person who simply believed his actions were normal. The author of this book, political theorist Hannah Arendt, refers to this theory as the “banality of evil.” Arendt was a Jew who fled Germany in the early 1930s. 

Yale professor Seyla Benhabib offers an overview of the controversy surrounding Arendt’s book, and what lessons it can teach us about humanity. Benhabib spoke at the University of Washington’s Kane Hall on October 24, 2013 as part of the Graduate School lecture series.

Civil Rights
2:43 pm
Thu January 9, 2014

'The War On Poverty' Helped Shape Seattle Activism

Ross Reynolds talks with University of Washington historian Trevor Griffey about Seattle's role in protests that led to the early formation of affirmative action.

A Whale's Wail
5:00 am
Thu January 2, 2014

Call Of The Sound: Romance Of Foghorns Endures

A Washington state ferry moves through the fog.
Flickr Photo/Steve Johnson

If you live near downtown Seattle, you may have recently heard a long, low horn reverberating through the soupy nighttime air.

It happens every once in a while and has some Seattleites mystified. Where does the sound come from? It is a train? A boat? Last call at a Capitol Hill bar?

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History
3:59 pm
Tue December 31, 2013

The Long Road Back: Polish-Jewish Relations Today

Louise Steinman's book "The Crooked Mirror."

"Do they miss us?”

That was the question on Louise Steinman’s mind  when she decided to travel to Poland and explore the country’s efforts at reconciliation with their traumatic past of dual occupations of the Nazis and Soviets.

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War Pilgrimage
3:42 pm
Mon December 30, 2013

Back To Vietnam: One Veteran's Story

Bahia de Halong, Vietnam
Flickr Photo/fontxito

Ross Reynolds sits down with Richard Brummett, a Vietnam War veteran who is one of thousands of vets who have made pilgrimages back to the country where they fought.

Seattle History
2:51 pm
Mon December 30, 2013

Norm Rice, Seattle's 'Mayor Nice,' Says It's Time To Retire

Norm Rice, left, and Barack Obama, around 2008.
Flickr Photo/Seattle Municipal Archives

It's been more than a decade since Norman B. Rice ran Seattle. But Seattleites still remember “Mayor Nice,” as he was known.

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International District
9:38 am
Fri December 27, 2013

Fire Burns Historic Seattle Building Where Wah Mee Massacre Took Place

A Seattle Fire truck retracts a ladder from the Hudson Building in the International District where a fire burned the upper floors of a century-old brick building.
Credit KUOW Photo/Phyllis Fletcher

Djin Kwie Liem estimates he lost 20,000 fish.

“Goldfish, koi, tropical fish,” he specified.

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