history

Kathy Parrish as a child with her father, George Dean, at the YWCA pool in Seattle. The pool would be heated to a higher degree for polio patients at certain times.
Courtesy of Kathy Parrish

Ross Reynolds speaks with polio survivor and post-polio syndrome sufferer Kathy Parrish about her experience as a child with polio and the lasting impacts of the disease. Parrish was diagnosed with the disease in 1950, five years before the Jonas Salk vaccination was declared safe.

Coffee and tea both landed in the British isles in the 1600s. In fact, java even got a head start of about a decade. And yet, a century later, tea was well on its way to becoming a daily habit for millions of Britons — which it remains to this day.

So how did tea emerge as Britain's hot beverage of choice?

Lisa Pauley was a volunteer at an Adventist hospital in Hong Kong. Joyce Wertz Harrington, a fellow nurse, photographed their 30-hour journey.
Courtesy of Joyce Wertz Harrington

The scene was chaos.

The mood was tense.

The Viet Cong approached.

Mothers cried as they dropped off their babies to be loaded onto a Boeing 747 in Saigon, final destination Seattle.

The Brontosaurus may be back.

Not that it ever really went away, at least not in the minds of generations of people who grew up watching Fred Flintstone devour one of his beloved Brontosaurus burgers.

But if you're a scientist, you have to stick to the rules, and in 1903, the name Brontosaurus was struck from the record. That was when paleontologist Elmer Riggs deemed that the Brontosaurus was really just a different dinosaur, Apatosaurus.

Ross Reynolds talks to Crosscut's Knute Berger about what is lost when the state makes cuts to heritage sites like the State Capital Museum. 

The Selma to Montgomery March in 1965. Martin Luther King, Jr. is at center.
Public Domain

In March 1965, Steven Graves was studying in a Unitarian seminary in Chicago when he learned Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was asking people from around the country to gather in Selma, Alabama, to march for voting rights for black people.

Graves asked himself an important question that would change his life path.

Newlywed bride and groom stepping into car, circa 1955.  Sign in front passenger side window reads "Hold Her Tight."
MOHAI, Al Smith Collection, 2014.49

Seattle is a young city, young enough that most of its history can be traced through photographs.

Until recently though, most of those photos have been official portraits or documentation of public works projects like the Lake Washington Ship Canal.

Courtesy Boeing

There is an old saying in the Pacific Northwest about the state’s largest private employer: “When Boeing sneezes, Seattle catches cold.” 

The Puget Sound region has had its fair share of sniffles over the years, but 14 years ago Boeing made a decision that was one of the most dramatic in the company’s entire history.

Jimi Hendrix in 1967.
Wikipedia Photo

Jeannie Yandel talks with music historian and Jimi Hendrix biographer Charles Cross about a collection of early songs featuring Hendrix getting an official re-release.

Michael Stephens, founder of the Macefield Music Festival, looks at Edith Macefield's house on a recent afternoon. The house is now owned by the bank and could be put on the open market.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

If Edith Macefield had been standing outside the King County courthouse, she might have rolled her eyes.

An auctioneer stood behind a white plastic table. Men in black zip-up jackets sidled up to sign up to bid on her tiny Ballard house. Elbowing reporters jostled for space.

A shot-down fire balloon reinflated by Americans in California.
Wikipedia Photo

On March 13, 1945, World War II came to the U.S. mainland when a Japanese bomb fell on Everett, Washington.

But no airplane dropped it: A hydrogen balloon launched from a beach on Japan’s Honshu island had carried the incendiary device thousands of miles in just three or four days. Once the 30-foot diameter balloon reached 30,000-35,000 feet, strong westerly winds of the upper atmosphere – the jet stream – carried it toward North America.

Our guest on this episode of Speakers Forum is David J. Morris, a war correspondent, former Marine and PTSD sufferer.

Morris served as a lieutenant in the Marine Corps in the 1990s, but did not see combat then. He went on to work as an embedded journalist in Iraq and Afghanistan. In 2004 he was nearly killed when a Humvee he was riding in hit an IED.

Sunset over the Alabama River and the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma.
Flickr Photo/sunsurfr (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to University of Washington communication professor David Domke about the pilgrimage he and 52 fellow travelers took to the deep south. They met with civil rights leaders and visited key monuments in the civil rights movement. The trip culminated in Selma, Alabama on the Edmund Pettus Bridge where President Obama spoke in commemoration of the 50th anniversary of "Bloody Sunday."

Fishing boats on Puget Sound
Flickr Photo/Canopic (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Sixty years ago, in the middle of the night, a Navy ship struck a small fishing boat in Puget Sound. The Santa Maria was from Tacoma, and three fishermen on board died. The deaths of three working men made front-page news, and their widows sued the Navy, but it looked like they would get nowhere, until a sound saved the day for them.

Note to our readers: This report contains some strong racial language.

This month Selma, Ala., will mark the 50th anniversary of "Bloody Sunday." That's the day police beat demonstrators attempting to march to Montgomery in support of voting rights. Some of the most iconic images of that day were captured by a white photographer — the late Spider Martin.

Pages