history

AP Photo/Nati Harnik, File

Most of us heard poetry as babies — nursery rhymes, lullabies, that sort of thing. By the time we reach adulthood, though, poetry is no longer part of our every day lives.

Former U.S. Poet Laureate Ted Kooser says poetry has become something scary. Kooser traces that fear  back to the early 20th century, when modernist poets like T.S. Eliot and Ezra Pound were popular.

A law passed to protect the Union army in the Civil War is one of the key tools federal officials have used to collect tens of billion in corporate fines this year.

During the Civil War, the army relied heavily on private contractors for necessities like uniforms, shoes, and gunpowder. Those contractors often cut corners.

KUOW Photo/Marcie Sillman

Just past the front door of the Burke Natural History Museum, on the University of Washington campus, you’ll find a little alcove. It’s the perfect place to linger on a rainy day.  

Under display cases of sparkling crystals and other mineral specimens, you’ll see sets of slim drawers. Open one, and after you let out a squeak of surprise, you can marvel at the bodies of insects, birds and other small creatures those drawers contain.

Early last month, on a hill outside a tiny, windy village of almond and tobacco farmers in northeastern Greece, veteran archaeologist Katerina Peristeri announced that she and her team had discovered what is believed to be the biggest tomb in Greece.

The "massive, magnificent tomb," Peristeri told reporters, is likely connected to the ancient Greek kingdom of Macedonia, which, in the fourth century B.C. produced Alexander the Great.

Seventy years ago Friday, an 11-month frenzied construction project went hot. It all happened in the remote southeast Washington desert.

Flickr Photo/Chris Blakeley (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Kenneth C. Davis, author of "Don't Know Much About History," about the story behind Columbus Day. 

David Hyde talks to author Rick Perlstein about his new book, "The Invisible Bridge: The Fall of Nixon and the Rise of Reagan."

If you have ever seen, or spent time with (or, God forbid, had to live with) a colicky baby, this will make perfect sense to you. It may not make actual sense, but when the baby is crying you don't think very straight.

Jeannie Yandel talks with documentarian Ken Burns about what makes a good story. His new series, "The Roosevelts," airs September 14 on PBS.

The story most people learn about the Nez Perce Tribe and the capture of Chief Joseph doesn't tell the whole history. 

In a hall inside the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute in Alabama on Saturday, long tables are draped with black linen. Experts are bent over tables, examining aging quilts, letters filled with tight, hand-penned script, and yellowing black-and-white photos tacked into crackling albums — all family keepsakes brought in by local residents.

KUOW Photo/Arwen Nicks

Ross Reynolds speaks with John Dean, who was President Richard Nixon's one-time legal counsel and was a pivotal figure in the Watergate scandal that led to Nixon's resignation in 1974.  

KUOW Photo/Derek Wang

On Vashon Island, there's an unusual local attraction.

It's an old, red, child's bicycle that's growing out of a tree.

Flickr Photo/Debbie R

American as apple pie, the expression goes.

Except that the only apple native to North America is the crab apple, said Rowan Jacobsen, author of “Apples of Uncommon Character.” He spoke with KUOW’s Marcie Sillman about apple history – and where you can find the most delicious varieties.

Flickr Photo/Michael Fleshman (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Dr. Françoise Barré-Sinoussi, who is credited with discovering the HIV virus in 1983, about the early days of HIV/AIDS research, and why she's hopeful that a cure can be found. She won the Nobel Prize in 2008 for her work on the HIV virus.

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