history

Celebrating The Past
5:00 pm
Wed February 20, 2013

New Life For Restored Memories From Seattle’s Female Rockers

Sarah Rudinoff in "These Streets."
Photo/Charles Peterson

You probably know the bands that put Seattle on the international music map in the early 1990s. Nirvana, Soundgarden and Pearl Jam have become legends, but they're only part of the Seattle music story. Women rocked the scene, too. Gretta Harley came to Seattle in 1990, looking for her tribe, and she says she found it.

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Culture
8:00 am
Wed February 20, 2013

Jared Diamond: Learning From Traditional Societies

Professor Jared Diamond lecturing at Maria Theresia College, Belgium, November 2008.
groucho Flickr

Pulitzer Prize-winning author Jared Diamond joins Ross Reynolds in front of a live studio audience. For decades he has studied Papua New Guinea cultures. He writes about what we can learn from traditional social organizations in his new book "The World Until Yesterday." Below are highlights from the interview.

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Seattle Air Disaster
8:03 am
Fri February 15, 2013

70 Years Ago: Remembering The Crash Of Boeing’s Superfortress

Firefighters and other emergency personnel respond to the crash of a B-29 prototype at the Frye Meat Packing Plant on February 18, 1943. A total of 32 died on the plane and in the fire.
Courtesy MOHAI/Seattle Post-Intelligencer Collection

The Boeing Dreamliner was been grounded since Jan. 16 as authorities try to sort out problems with the plane’s high tech batteries and electrical system. Meanwhile, it was 70 years ago this coming week that an earlier Boeing plane caught fire over Seattle during a test flight, causing one of the worst air disasters in the city’s history.

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Religious History
8:00 pm
Thu February 14, 2013

Muhammad's Extraordinary Life With Author Lesley Hazleton

Lesley Hazelton's "The First Muslim."
Credit courtesy/Riverhead

The name Muhammad is powerful and iconic, but what do we know about his life story? Lesley Hazleton brings Muhammad to life in this talk, recorded at Seattle's Town Hall on January 24, 2013.

Lesley Hazleton has written about the Middle East for The New York Times, The Nation, and Time magazine. Her most recent book is "The First Muslim: The Story of Muhammad."

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End Of An Era
12:41 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

How To Pick A Pope (With Latin Subtitles)

Black smoke rises from the chimney of the Sistine Chapel on April 18, 2005. Black smoke signaled that the cardinals sequestered inside had failed to elect a new pope, after the death of Pope John Paul II.
Alessandra Tarantino AP

Originally published on Tue February 12, 2013 6:27 am

For lovers of the lapsed language Latin, the selection of a new pope is an ecstasyfest.

The Roman Catholic Church is so steeped in centuries-old traditions, Pope Benedict XVI announced his surprise retirement on Monday the old-fashioned way — in Latin.

"Fratres carissimi," the Pope's retirement announcement began. Beloved brothers ...

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Historic Site Designation
11:10 am
Mon February 11, 2013

Wing Luke Museum Receives Federal Recognition

The Washington congressional delegation and outgoing Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar attended a ceremony to designate the Wing Luke Museum as a historic site Sunday.

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Seattle On Foot
1:04 pm
Fri February 8, 2013

The Hidden Legacy Of Seattle Stairways

Cathy and Jake Jaramillo at the Blaine Street stairs.
KUOW photo/Jeannie Yandel

When I meet Jake and Cathy Jaramillo, they tell me they consider Seattle a world-class city when it comes to public stairways. According to Jake, Seattle’s 650 stairways put the city in the top three for US cities with stairways, with Pittsburgh in first place and San Francisco in second. And since they moved here in 2001, they've been climbing Seattle’s stairs to meet people and uncover some of the city’s hidden nooks and crannies.

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Movies & History
12:37 pm
Fri February 8, 2013

Frank Rich And Sean Wilentz On The Oscars And African-American History

Anne Hathaway, nominated for best actress in a supporting role for ‘Les Miserables,’ left, and Steven Spielberg, nominated for best picture and best director for ‘Lincoln,’ attend the 85th Academy Awards Nominees Luncheon on Monday, Feb. 4, 2013.
John Shearer/Invision/AP

David Hyde talks with Frank Rich about the historical significance of Quentin Tarantino’s "Django Unchained" and why Rich thinks it deserves to win an Academy Award for best picture. Then he turns to historian Sean Wilentz who thinks it is not "Django Unchained" but Steven Spielberg's "Lincoln" that is the historically accurate and significant film that deserves the Oscar.

Seattle History
9:00 am
Wed January 30, 2013

Seattle's History In 25 Objects

Thousands of years ago this skeleton was a Giant Ground Sloth. These gigantic, bear-like animals were once common all over North America. This guy was around roughly at the end of the Ice-Age.
Burke Museum

What do a burned glue pot, a vintage cardigan and a Starbucks coffee cup share in common? In this case, each represents a chapter in Seattle's history. Inspired by the BBC's A History of the World In 100 Objects, we reached out to local museum curators, artifact owners, writers and historians to help us narrow down a list of 25 objects that tell Seattle’s story. Writer and author Knute Berger and MOHAI historian Lorraine McConaghy join us for a look into the past.

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Radio History
2:44 pm
Fri January 25, 2013

The Rise Of KUOW And Public Radio In Seattle

Volunteers from Group Health answer phones for a KUOW pledge drive.
Group Health

KUOW recently began its seventh decade on the air in Seattle. All this week we’ve been looking back at the history of radio in the Puget Sound Region. Today, Feliks Banel explores how local public radio has evolved over that last 30 years as a result of changes in commercial radio and the rise of national programming.

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Food History
12:00 pm
Fri January 25, 2013

What's The Deal With Horse Slaughter?

Welsh mountain ponies auctioned for meat at the Llanybydder horse mart, Wales, 2006.
sheffpixie Flickr

Today in the US there’s not much of a market for horse meat. But believe it or not, there used to be over 20 US processing plants that sold American horse meat to Asian and European markets.


Last Friday The Conversation got a call from a listener demanding that President Obama reintroduce a ban on horse slaughter. So we got a little curious. Today Ross talks to Seattle Times reporter Lynda Mapes about the history of horse slaughter in the US.

Radio History
12:22 pm
Thu January 24, 2013

The Early Years Of KUOW

KUOW's early home back in 1955 at the Communications Building at the University of Washington.
University of Washington archives

KUOW recently began its seventh decade on the air in Seattle.  In the second installment of a three-part series exploring the history of KUOW, Feliks Banel takes us back to the station’s early years before pledge drives and NPR, and then on to the rise of public radio in the 1970s.

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Radio History
4:10 pm
Wed January 23, 2013

The Golden Years Of Radio In Seattle

Broadcasters around a microphone in the living room-like studio of radio station KFOA in Seattle's Rhodes Department store in 1923.
Courtesy of MOHAI

It’s been more than 60 years since KUOW first went on the air in Seattle, but local radio history goes back a bit further than that.  In the first installment of a three part series, Feliks Banel has the story of what radio sounded like around here in the years before KUOW.

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Record Store Nostalgia
4:07 pm
Fri January 18, 2013

Slideshow: Tacoma's Tower Records

The Tacoma Tower Records Store on 38th Street wasn’t just a store, it was a scene. Complete with cutting edge finds, knowledgeable staff, colorful displays, and intriguing people, music-hungry teens combed the aisles in search of new treasures.
Bill Hansen

KUOW listeners Whitney Keyes and Chris Porter share their memories of Tacoma Tower Records with us.

Whitney Keyes

“I grew up in Tacoma, Washington, and my favorite record store on the planet was the Tower Records near the Tacoma Mall. It was the go-to place to get the hottest 45s and albums -- and check out cute boys!

“I LOVED going down every aisle, alphabetically in my fave music categories, looking at the covers -- front and back of EVERY record.

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Local Music Vendors
12:20 pm
Thu January 17, 2013

Map: Do We Still Need Record Stores?

Luz Bratcher Flickr

Tomorrow is a dark day for many a Seattle vinyl enthusiast — Easy Street Records, the lower Queen Anne record store, is closing after serving the Emerald City for more than a dozen years. Many are bemoaning the loss of the Queen Anne record store, but what about you? Do record stores matter to you? I mean, do they really matter? Do you still buy music from stores, and how much?

With music available online through iTunes and services like Spotify, why do we still need record stores? Ross Reynolds talks with local music writer Charles Cross, Sarah Moody from Hardly Art and Eli Anderson from Neumos and takes listener calls.

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