history

Controversy And Competition
10:46 am
Tue September 17, 2013

There She Is: The History Of Miss America

The newly crowned Miss America, Nina Davuluri, who received her title on September 15.
AP Photo/Julio Cortez

Last Sunday Miss New York Nina Davuluri, 24, was crowned Miss America. She is the first winner of Indian descent and proudly displayed her heritage with a classical Bollywood fusion dance as her talent.

Controversy followed the coronation, as Twitter exploded with racist remarks condemning her victory. The online viewer poll favored Miss Kansas: the blonde soldier with the "Serenity Prayer" down her side.

Read more
Audio Postcard
2:55 pm
Mon September 16, 2013

Volunteers Restore Historic Jet In Everett

A DeHavilland Comet is undergoing restoration in Everett.
KUOW Photo/Sarah Waller

Volunteers at the Museum of Flight Restoration Center in Everett have been working diligently since 1995 to restore one of the last DeHavilland Comets. The Comet was the world’s first commercial jetliner, and its body shape inspired the jets of today.

Read more
Navy Headquarters
10:00 am
Mon September 16, 2013

Washington Navy Yard, Site Of Shooting, Has Long History

King George VI and Queen Elizabeth arrive at the Washington Navy Yard on June 9, 1939, to join President Franklin Roosevelt on a cruise down the Potomac River to Mount Vernon, Va.
AP

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 5:10 am

The sprawling Washington Navy Yard, scene of a deadly shooting Monday, is the Navy's oldest shore establishment and has long been considered the "ceremonial gateway" to the nation's capital.

The yard went into operation at the turn of the 19th century. Today, it employs thousands of people and is regarded as the "quarterdeck of the Navy" for its role as headquarters for the Naval District Washington.

Read more
Corporal Punishment
7:12 am
Fri September 13, 2013

Hanging Up The Paddle: 20 Years Since Washington Banned Corporal Punishment In Public Schools

Credit Sarah Waller

Did you grow up in a school that allowed paddling?  Maybe you knew someone who was hit in school – or maybe the idea of corporal punishment seems as antiquated as ink wells.  This year marks the 20th anniversary of Washington’s state-wide ban on corporal punishment in public schools.

Read more
Railroad History
9:28 am
Mon September 9, 2013

Former Northwest Railroad Town Struggles To Keep Last 25 People

Jessica Robinson Northwest News Network

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 6:05 pm

Take a drive down any highway in the Northwest, and you'll pass signs for dozens of small towns. There are more than 700 cities under 10,000 people in Washington, Oregon and Idaho. Many of these towns came about because of railroads or timber or mines and now they’re trying to figure out what comes next.

It's nearly 2:15 in Avery, Idaho. The mail has arrived. And the post office is about to become the busiest place in town.

Read more
Strange Language
11:18 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Ben Zimmer On Having And Eating Cake

Flickr Photo/Jeff Anderson

You can’t have your cake and eat it too, but how are you supposed to eat cake you don’t have? Language guru Ben Zimmer is back today and he explains the whole having, eating and not having cake thing. And what that has to do with how the Unabomber was captured. Really.

Read more
Occidental Square
9:41 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Live From Pioneer Square: The Washington Shoe Building

Two of Seattle's tallest: Columbia Center on the left and Smith Tower on the right. Also, featuring Seattle cloud cover. Ah, summer in Seattle.
Credit KUOW Photo/Nick Danielson

The Record on KUOW will broadcast live from the Washington Shoe Building on Occidental Square (410 Occidental Way South), Friday, from noon to 2 p.m. If you live or work in Pioneer Square, come by and tell us about your neighborhood. We’ll explore its demographics, history and how it’s changed in the past 20 years.

Highlights From The KUOW Booth


Read more
Strange Language
11:39 am
Thu September 5, 2013

Ben Zimmer: On The Whole 9 Yards And Phrase Inflation

Flickr Photo/Jesus V

Did you know that the phrase "the whole 9 yards" used to be "the whole 6 yards?" It’s true. And cloud nine, that fantastic place to be, used to be cloud seven, then cloud eight. So how did we get to nine yards and cloud nine? Ben Zimmer is back today to talk about phrase inflation as we consider our series on strange language.

Read more
Military Tactics
9:38 am
Thu September 5, 2013

Why Do Chemical Weapons Evoke Such A Strong Reaction?

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 2:22 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

It took more than two years and at least 100,000 lives lost for the U.S. government to threaten Syria with military action. The catalyst was the Syrian military's alleged use of chemical weapons. President Obama called the attack on August 21st an assault on human dignity.

NPR's Jackie Northam examines why chemical weapons evoke such a strong and different reaction than conventional weapons.

Read more
Strange Language
10:03 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

Ben Zimmer: The Roots Of "Pipe Dreams"

Flickr Photo/Andre Lucero

Yesterday we heard some history on the term "doping" in sports and today, language columnist Ben Zimmer explains where the term "pipe dream" comes from. 

Read more
Strange Language
12:21 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

From Gravy To Drugs: Ben Zimmer On The Origin Of "Dope"

Flickr Photo/NCinDC

We’ve seen lots of sports scandals in the news over the years that have to do with performance-enhancing drugs, commonly referred to as doping. Dope, from the Dutch word doop, is actually a gravy or a sauce, so how did we go from gravy to drugs? Lexicographer Ben Zimmer gives KUOW's Ross Reynolds the straight dope on dope.

Read more
Skid Row's Origins
11:13 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Seattle's Skid Row: I Remember You!

Sunny Speidel talks with KUOW host Ross Reynolds about the history of Seattle's Skid Row.
Credit KUOW Photo/Nick Danielson

When you hear the term "skid row" perhaps you think of Sebastian Bach or maybe the notorious Los Angeles neighborhood nicknamed Skid Row, but did you know that Seattle had the original Skid Row and it was actually Skid Road?

Ross Reynolds talks with Sunny Speidel of Seattle’s Underground Tour as The Record kicks off this week’s look at Seattle’s self-proclaimed first neighborhood, Pioneer Square.

Read more
I Have A Dream
9:54 am
Wed August 28, 2013

Nation's Capitol Celebration: 50-Year Anniversary Of The March On Washington

Hundreds of thousands descended on Washington, D.C.'s, Lincoln Memorial August 28, 1963.
From Wikipedia.

In honor of the 50-year anniversary of the March on Washington and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech, NPR will be airing special live coverage of the celebration starting at 11:00 a.m. PT in the nation’s Capitol.

Read more
The March On Washington At 50
12:34 am
Wed August 28, 2013

For King's Adviser, Fulfilling The Dream 'Cannot Wait'

Clarence B. Jones, legal adviser to Martin Luther King Jr., takes notes behind King at a press conference regarding in Birmingham, Ala., in February 1963.
Ernst Haas Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 9:33 am

For the month of August, Morning Edition and The Race Card Project are looking back at a seminal moment in civil rights history: the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, where the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his iconic "I Have a Dream Speech" Aug. 28, 1963. Approximately 250,000 people descended on the nation's capital from all over the country for the mass demonstration.

Read more
Television
6:00 am
Tue August 27, 2013

Micky Dolenz, Annie Leibovitz And "America In The King Years"

Flickr Photo/Cathy Cole

Micky Dolenz On A Life In Show Biz

George Michael “Micky” Dolenz, Jr., is best known for his role in the television sitcom, “The Monkees.” He became the drummer and a lead vocalist for the band created for the show. But Micky Dolenz spent much of his life in the show biz. Back in 1993, Steve Scher talked with Micky Dolenz about his path to music and the many other projects Micky worked on over the years.

Annie Leibovitz On The Stories Behind Her Photos

Annie Leibovitz began taking photographs for Rolling Stone in 1970. By 1973, she was its chief photographer. In addition to magazine editorial work, Leibovitz has created successful advertising campaigns for American Express, Gap and the Milk Board, among others. Exhibitions of her work have appeared in museums and galleries all over the world. What are the stories behind Annie Leibovitz's iconic photos? Steve Scher talked with Annie Leibovitz in 2008 about what it’s like to photograph queens, presidents and the like.

Taylor Branch On Martin Luther King

Pulitzer Prize-winning author Taylor Branch has written a three-volume history of Martin Luther King Jr. and the civil rights movement, “America In The King Years.” Steve Scher talked with Taylor Branch in 2006 about King’s legacy, democracy and nonviolence.

Pages