history

Occidental Square
9:41 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Live From Pioneer Square: The Washington Shoe Building

Two of Seattle's tallest: Columbia Center on the left and Smith Tower on the right. Also, featuring Seattle cloud cover. Ah, summer in Seattle.
Credit KUOW Photo/Nick Danielson

The Record on KUOW will broadcast live from the Washington Shoe Building on Occidental Square (410 Occidental Way South), Friday, from noon to 2 p.m. If you live or work in Pioneer Square, come by and tell us about your neighborhood. We’ll explore its demographics, history and how it’s changed in the past 20 years.

Highlights From The KUOW Booth


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Strange Language
11:39 am
Thu September 5, 2013

Ben Zimmer: On The Whole 9 Yards And Phrase Inflation

Flickr Photo/Jesus V

Did you know that the phrase "the whole 9 yards" used to be "the whole 6 yards?" It’s true. And cloud nine, that fantastic place to be, used to be cloud seven, then cloud eight. So how did we get to nine yards and cloud nine? Ben Zimmer is back today to talk about phrase inflation as we consider our series on strange language.

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Military Tactics
9:38 am
Thu September 5, 2013

Why Do Chemical Weapons Evoke Such A Strong Reaction?

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 2:22 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

It took more than two years and at least 100,000 lives lost for the U.S. government to threaten Syria with military action. The catalyst was the Syrian military's alleged use of chemical weapons. President Obama called the attack on August 21st an assault on human dignity.

NPR's Jackie Northam examines why chemical weapons evoke such a strong and different reaction than conventional weapons.

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Strange Language
10:03 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

Ben Zimmer: The Roots Of "Pipe Dreams"

Flickr Photo/Andre Lucero

Yesterday we heard some history on the term "doping" in sports and today, language columnist Ben Zimmer explains where the term "pipe dream" comes from. 

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Strange Language
12:21 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

From Gravy To Drugs: Ben Zimmer On The Origin Of "Dope"

Flickr Photo/NCinDC

We’ve seen lots of sports scandals in the news over the years that have to do with performance-enhancing drugs, commonly referred to as doping. Dope, from the Dutch word doop, is actually a gravy or a sauce, so how did we go from gravy to drugs? Lexicographer Ben Zimmer gives KUOW's Ross Reynolds the straight dope on dope.

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Skid Row's Origins
11:13 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Seattle's Skid Row: I Remember You!

Sunny Speidel talks with KUOW host Ross Reynolds about the history of Seattle's Skid Row.
Credit KUOW Photo/Nick Danielson

When you hear the term "skid row" perhaps you think of Sebastian Bach or maybe the notorious Los Angeles neighborhood nicknamed Skid Row, but did you know that Seattle had the original Skid Row and it was actually Skid Road?

Ross Reynolds talks with Sunny Speidel of Seattle’s Underground Tour as The Record kicks off this week’s look at Seattle’s self-proclaimed first neighborhood, Pioneer Square.

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I Have A Dream
9:54 am
Wed August 28, 2013

Nation's Capitol Celebration: 50-Year Anniversary Of The March On Washington

Hundreds of thousands descended on Washington, D.C.'s, Lincoln Memorial August 28, 1963.
From Wikipedia.

In honor of the 50-year anniversary of the March on Washington and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech, NPR will be airing special live coverage of the celebration starting at 11:00 a.m. PT in the nation’s Capitol.

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The March On Washington At 50
12:34 am
Wed August 28, 2013

For King's Adviser, Fulfilling The Dream 'Cannot Wait'

Clarence B. Jones, legal adviser to Martin Luther King Jr., takes notes behind King at a press conference regarding in Birmingham, Ala., in February 1963.
Ernst Haas Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 9:33 am

For the month of August, Morning Edition and The Race Card Project are looking back at a seminal moment in civil rights history: the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, where the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his iconic "I Have a Dream Speech" Aug. 28, 1963. Approximately 250,000 people descended on the nation's capital from all over the country for the mass demonstration.

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Television
6:00 am
Tue August 27, 2013

Micky Dolenz, Annie Leibovitz And "America In The King Years"

Flickr Photo/Cathy Cole

Micky Dolenz On A Life In Show Biz

George Michael “Micky” Dolenz, Jr., is best known for his role in the television sitcom, “The Monkees.” He became the drummer and a lead vocalist for the band created for the show. But Micky Dolenz spent much of his life in the show biz. Back in 1993, Steve Scher talked with Micky Dolenz about his path to music and the many other projects Micky worked on over the years.

Annie Leibovitz On The Stories Behind Her Photos

Annie Leibovitz began taking photographs for Rolling Stone in 1970. By 1973, she was its chief photographer. In addition to magazine editorial work, Leibovitz has created successful advertising campaigns for American Express, Gap and the Milk Board, among others. Exhibitions of her work have appeared in museums and galleries all over the world. What are the stories behind Annie Leibovitz's iconic photos? Steve Scher talked with Annie Leibovitz in 2008 about what it’s like to photograph queens, presidents and the like.

Taylor Branch On Martin Luther King

Pulitzer Prize-winning author Taylor Branch has written a three-volume history of Martin Luther King Jr. and the civil rights movement, “America In The King Years.” Steve Scher talked with Taylor Branch in 2006 about King’s legacy, democracy and nonviolence.

Presidential History
6:00 am
Thu August 22, 2013

Products For Big Americans, George Carlin And The Life Of Alexander Hamilton

Ron Chernow's biography "Alexander Hamilton."

Big Americans: From Comfortable Products To Confidence

     

Americans are bigger than ever, and many are finding the need for products, such as seat belt extenders, to make their lives more comfortable. In 2004, Steve Scher talked with Susan V. James, founder of Abundance Northwest, and Bill Fabrey, then president of Amplestuff.com, about fat acceptance and how products can help build confidence.

A Conversation With Comedian George Carlin

American comedian, actor and writer George Carlin was known for his black humor. His comedy routine “Seven Dirty Words” remains to this day the same list of words deemed unsuitable for broadcast programming. Carlin passed away in June, 2008. Steve Scher talked with George Carlin back in 1997 about his life, pet peeves and politically correct language.

The Life Of Alexander Hamilton

Alexander Hamilton spent his childhood in the Caribbean. He left to become an architect of modern American government. Historian Ron Chernow chronicled Hamilton’s life in the biography, "Alexander Hamilton." Steve Scher talked with Ron Chernow in 2004 about Hamilton’s time in war, his education and the perhaps misplaced bad rap Hamilton often receives.

Civil Rights History
4:43 am
Wed August 14, 2013

A Postman's 1963 Walk For Justice, Cut Short On An Alabama Road

Civil rights activist William Moore made several one-man marches for racial equality. In April 1963, he was killed during a march from Chattanooga, Tenn., to Jackson, Miss.
Baltimore Sun

In April of 1963, a Baltimore mailman set off to deliver the most important letter in his life — one he wrote himself. William Lewis Moore decided to walk along Highway 11 from Chattanooga, Tenn., to Jackson, Miss., hoping to hand-deliver his letter to Gov. Ross Barnett. Moore wanted Barnett to fundamentally change Mississippi's racial hierarchy — something unthinkable for a Southern politician at the time.

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Birth Of Revolution
8:00 pm
Thu August 8, 2013

"Revolutionary Summer" With Historian Joseph Ellis

Joseph Ellis' book "Revolutionary Summer."

In the summer of 1776, 13 colonies seceded from the British Empire. The British sent the largest armada across the Atlantic to quell the rebellion; and a revolution begans.

Historian Joseph Ellis offers a new perspective on the Revolutionary War in his latest book, “Revolutionary Summer: The Birth of American Independence.” Ellis spoke at Town Hall on July 10.

This Not Just In
12:30 am
Fri July 26, 2013

President Harding's Last Public Speech At Husky Stadium

President Warren G. Harding.
Wikipedia

On July 27, 1923, Warren G. Harding spoke at Husky Stadium. It would be the last public speech the president would ever give.

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American History
8:00 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

How Benjamin Franklin Enlightened America With Jonathan Lyons

Founding Father Benjamin Franklin
From Wikipedia.

When Benjamin Franklin (and friends) brought the ideals of the Enlightenment to a nascent United States, he laid the foundation for the political revolution that would follow. Historian Jonathan Lyons spoke about the founding father and the country’s intellectual coming-of-age in this talk recorded at Town Hall on June 27.

Vintage Seattle
1:06 pm
Tue July 16, 2013

Seattle's History In High Resolution

Library of Congress

Ever wondered what Seattle looked like after the Great Fire or what Dick's looked like in the 1950s? Vintage Seattle is piecing together Seattle's history with beautiful, high-resolution images of its architecture, landmarks and historical events. The blog's stated mission is to "help us find our way forward by looking back."

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