history

Woman and soldier watching sun set behind Minidoka watchtower in Idaho, 1944.
Flickr Photo/IMLS Digital Collections and Content (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks to author and historian  Richard Reeves about his new book, "Infamy: The Shocking Story Of The Japanese Internment In World War II."

Thoa Nguyen competes on "Beat Bobby Flay."
Courtesy of the Food Network

Marcie Sillman talks with Seattle chef Thoa Nguyen about her long and winding path path to successful Seattle restaurateur. Nguyen filmed a segment on Beat Bobby Flay for the Food Network which will be airing May 14.

Heroin drugs seized by the Counter Narcotics Police of Afghanistan.
Flickr Photo/UK Ministry of Defence

Marcie Sillman talks to journalist Sam Quinones about his book "Dreamland: The True Tale of America's Opiate Epidemic." 

The Americas are seen from space on Earth Day 2014 in a photo captured by NOAA's GOES-East satellite.
NASA/NOAA/GOES Project

Marcie Sillman talks with Denis Hayes, local environmental activist and founder of Earth Day, about how the perfect name for the day was determined.

The only surviving photo of the Cambodian genocide from Charles Som Nguyen's family. Pictured are his aunt and uncle.
Courtesy of Charles Som Nguyen

When Charles Som Nguyen was a kid in Oregon, his mom would occasionally tell stories over dinner about her home country of Cambodia.  More often than not, she wouldn’t recount happy memories.

Instead, she would tell stories about living in labor camps, of running away while bodies fell and bullets whizzed past her ears, of finding her own sister dead.

The Holocaust memorial in Berlin.
Flickr Photo/Rodrigo David (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman speaks with 89-year-old Holocaust survivor Sonia Warshawski and her granddaughter, Seattle-based filmmaker Leah Warshawski.

Kathy Parrish as a child with her father, George Dean, at the YWCA pool in Seattle. The pool would be heated to a higher degree for polio patients at certain times.
Courtesy of Kathy Parrish

Ross Reynolds speaks with polio survivor and post-polio syndrome sufferer Kathy Parrish about her experience as a child with polio and the lasting impacts of the disease. Parrish was diagnosed with the disease in 1950, five years before the Jonas Salk vaccination was declared safe.

Ralph Munro, Washington's former secretary of state, blows bubbles with Vietnamese refugees. Gov. Dan Evans asked Munro to find out more about the refugees, so he went to Camp Pendleton in California in 1975.
Courtesy of Ralph Munro

Dan Evans was furious.

So furious he cursed (and he was not someone who swore).

It was 1975 and the Washington state governor had picked up the morning paper and read that Gov. Jerry Brown of California had said Vietnamese refugees wouldn’t be welcome in his state.

Coffee and tea both landed in the British isles in the 1600s. In fact, java even got a head start of about a decade. And yet, a century later, tea was well on its way to becoming a daily habit for millions of Britons — which it remains to this day.

So how did tea emerge as Britain's hot beverage of choice?

Lisa Pauley was a volunteer at an Adventist hospital in Hong Kong. Joyce Wertz Harrington, a fellow nurse, photographed their 30-hour journey.
Courtesy of Joyce Wertz Harrington

The scene was chaos.

The mood was tense.

The Viet Cong approached.

Mothers cried as they dropped off their babies to be loaded onto a Boeing 747 in Saigon, final destination Seattle.

The Brontosaurus may be back.

Not that it ever really went away, at least not in the minds of generations of people who grew up watching Fred Flintstone devour one of his beloved Brontosaurus burgers.

But if you're a scientist, you have to stick to the rules, and in 1903, the name Brontosaurus was struck from the record. That was when paleontologist Elmer Riggs deemed that the Brontosaurus was really just a different dinosaur, Apatosaurus.

Ross Reynolds talks to Crosscut's Knute Berger about what is lost when the state makes cuts to heritage sites like the State Capital Museum. 

Jeff Coats kidnapped David Grenier and stole his car in Tacoma, Washington on September 6, 1994. Coats was 14 years old, and was sent to adult prison. Now, Coats is a successful real estate agent who speaks on issues of imprisonment and rehabilitation.
Provided courtesy of Katherine Beckett, University of Washington

Ross Reynolds speaks with University of Washington sociology professor Katherine Beckett about the story of Jeff Coats who, along with two 17-year-old friends, robbed and kidnapped Tacoma resident David Grenier on Sept. 6, 1994. Beckett helped produce a full-length audio documentary about Coats, who she believes has rehabilitated himself.

The Selma to Montgomery March in 1965. Martin Luther King, Jr. is at center.
Public Domain

In March 1965, Steven Graves was studying in a Unitarian seminary in Chicago when he learned Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was asking people from around the country to gather in Selma, Alabama, to march for voting rights for black people.

Graves asked himself an important question that would change his life path.

Newlywed bride and groom stepping into car, circa 1955.  Sign in front passenger side window reads "Hold Her Tight."
MOHAI, Al Smith Collection, 2014.49

Seattle is a young city, young enough that most of its history can be traced through photographs.

Until recently though, most of those photos have been official portraits or documentation of public works projects like the Lake Washington Ship Canal.

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