history

Ta Kwe Say, 23, says this drawing in the book 'Forced to Flee' depicts how Burmese army recruits are programmed to choose violence over justice.
Courtesy of Erika Berg

What would you do if you were forced to leave your country and couldn't go home? For refugees in Washington state, that's more than a hypothetical question.

President Harry S. Truman goes for a car ride during a Puget Sound fishing trip. From left to right, Truman, Sen. Warren G. Magnuson, Gov. Monrad C. Wallgren, and Maj. Gen. Harry H. Vaughan.
Harry S. Truman Library & Museum

World War II was still boiling toward its end when President Harry S Truman left the nation’s capital, headed out West in one of history’s most momentous months.

His mission in June 1945? A little rest and relaxation among political allies and Puget Sound scenery in Washington.

Chris Hedges at the 2012 Occupy National Gathering in Philadelphia, PA
Flickr Photo/Steve Rhodes (CC-BY-NC-ND)

During his career as a journalist, Chris Hedges has seen first-hand the workings of revolution around the world. On a recent sweltering night at Town Hall Seattle he talked about the prospects for social upheaval right here in the United States.

Hedges’ latest book is “Wages of Rebellion: The Moral Imperative of Revolt.” In it he tells stories of rebels throughout history, and what it takes to stand up to powerful forces of injustice and oppression.  

Marcie Sillman speaks with Peter Lape, curator of archaeology at the Burke Museum, about the significance of recently revealed DNA tests on the Kennewick Man. The tests strongly indicate that the prehistoric male who roamed the Columbia River Basin 9,000 years ago is a distant ancestor of the modern-day Colville Tribe.

Kim-Long Nguyen displays the national flag of Vietnam prior to the war.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Vietnam’s national flag is an icon of communism. And many Vietnamese-Americans say it does not represent them.

Seattle’s Vietnamese community has long wanted official status for the country’s old flag. That day could be near. On Wednesday afternoon, a Seattle City Council committee will take up a resolution to recognize this heritage flag.

If it passes, the full council will likely vote on it June 22.

Terrence Roberts is shown at age 15 on Sept. 22, 1957, reading a newspaper after trying to enter all-white Central High School in Little Rock, Ark. He was turned away but tried again the next day.
AP PHOTO

Terrence Roberts didn’t hesitate when volunteers were sought to integrate an all-white high school in Little Rock, Arkansas.

"We had lived so long under the aegis of separate but equal," says Roberts, who was in Seattle last week to address graduates of the University of Washington School of Social Work.

Ross Reynolds interviews Ryan Harvie, co-director of a new documentary called "Bodyslam: Revenge of the Banana."

Between 2003 and 2009 a group called Seattle Semi-Pro Wrestling was packing dive bars in Seattle with gonzo wrestling performances. Characters like Ronald McFondle, Eddie Van Glam and The Banana were cabaret fighters, spoofing wrestling pros. 

Makah whalers celebrate atop a dead gray whale after a successful hunt seen in this May 17, 1999, file photo, in Neah Bay, Wash.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Ross Reynolds talks to historian Joshua Reid about his new book, a history of the Makah tribe  titled, “The Sea is My Country: The Maritime World of the Makahs."   

The Makahs' tribal land occupies  the Northwest corner of Washington state.  They gained worldwide attention in 1999 when they resumed the traditional practice of hunting for grey whales. Reid's book takes a fresh look at the controversy seen through the  history of the Makahs.

Reid, a member of the Snohomish tribe, was born and raised in Washington. In the fall he’ll be at the University of Washington as an associate professor of history and American Indian Studies.

Dr. Christian Sidor, Burke Museum curator of vertebrate paleontology, right, holds Washington’s first dinosaur fossil to compare it with the cast of a femur of another theropod dinosaur held by  Brandon Peecook, University of Washington graduate student.
Burke Museum

A large bone from a two-legged, meat-eating dinosaur has been discovered in the San Juan Islands – the first dinosaur fossil ever found in Washington state.

Researchers found the fossil by accident. In 2012, they were in Sucia Island State Park collecting sea creature fossils when they stumbled on a bone that looked unusual for that area.

A month later they returned to the site with paleontologists. Initially, Professor Christian Sidor of the Burke Museum didn’t believe it belonged to a dinosaur.  

But one feature of the bone convinced Sidor, a professor of biology at the University of Washington and vertebrate curator at the Burke Museum: “The muscles that actually attach to the back of the leg and retract the femur attach here. So this structure, the shape of it, and how close it is to the head of the femur tell us that this is a carnivorous dinosaur. All dinosaurs have this feature.”  

The scientists don’t know what kind of dinosaur the bone comes from, however, because there’s only a third of the bone. Sidor said it’s likely a therapod, which includes Tyrannosaurus rex, birds and Velociraptors. And they are pretty sure it is from the Late Cretaceous period and is about 80 million years old.

The eruption of Mount St. Helens on May 18, 1980 as seen from the east.
Flickr Photo/Washington DNR (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to Carolyn Driedger, a hydrologist and outreach coordinator for the U.S. Geological Survey, about what volcanologists have learned since Mount St. Helen's erupted 35 years ago and what other risks we face from Northwest volcanos.

Reid Blackburn, 27, was a photographer at The Columbian newspaper in Vancouver, Washington. He was killed in the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens.
National Press Photographers Foundation

Fay Blackburn of Vancouver, Washington, remembers what it was like when the world turned its attention to the eruption of Mount St. Helens 35 years ago.

Blackburn worked at The Columbian newspaper in Vancouver at the time. Her husband, Reid Blackburn, worked there too, as a staff photographer. He was camping on the mountain taking photos the day it erupted.

Woman and soldier watching sun set behind Minidoka watchtower in Idaho, 1944.
Flickr Photo/IMLS Digital Collections and Content (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks to author and historian  Richard Reeves about his new book, "Infamy: The Shocking Story Of The Japanese Internment In World War II."

Thoa Nguyen competes on "Beat Bobby Flay."
Courtesy of the Food Network

Marcie Sillman talks with Seattle chef Thoa Nguyen about her long and winding path path to successful Seattle restaurateur. Nguyen filmed a segment on Beat Bobby Flay for the Food Network which will be airing May 14.

Heroin drugs seized by the Counter Narcotics Police of Afghanistan.
Flickr Photo/UK Ministry of Defence

Marcie Sillman talks to journalist Sam Quinones about his book "Dreamland: The True Tale of America's Opiate Epidemic." 

The Americas are seen from space on Earth Day 2014 in a photo captured by NOAA's GOES-East satellite.
NASA/NOAA/GOES Project

Marcie Sillman talks with Denis Hayes, local environmental activist and founder of Earth Day, about how the perfect name for the day was determined.

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