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City Light Superintendent Gordon Vickery with a prototype AMC Gremlin electric car, 1973
Flickr Photo/Seattle Municipal Archives (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/UYLihW

Tesla tried to go mass market last year by starting production on the Model 3 – price tag starting at $35,000.

It didn’t go well. 

The legend and theorizing about Northwest skyjacker D.B. Cooper just won’t die. A new documentary about the unsolved 1971 hijacking introduces a new twist to the tale. It suggests we might have been looking for D.B. Cooper and his loot in the wrong place for all these years.

A walk in Seattle with my father, who was born a slave

Jul 12, 2018
Horace Cayton Jr., the author of Long Old Road, as an adult.
Library of Congress

Horace Cayton was an African-American sociologist born in Seattle in 1903. His father was born a slave; his mother was the daughter of the first black U.S. Congressman. This is an excerpt from his autobiography, The Long Old Road, published in 1963.

Seattle’s first black cop meets a killer over checkers

Jul 12, 2018
Horace Cayton was the first black deputy in Seattle.
KUOW Illustration/Teo Popescu

Horace Cayton was an African-American sociologist born in Seattle in 1903. His father was born a slave; his mother was the daughter of the first black U.S. Congressman. This is an excerpt from his autobiography, The Long Old Road, published in 1963.

Horace Cayton Jr., center, as an adult. Cayton worked many jobs before becoming an esteemed sociologist in Chicago — longshoreman and Seattle's first black deputy, among others.
Library of Congress

Horace Cayton was an African-American sociologist born in Seattle in 1903. His father was born a slave; his mother was the daughter of the first black U.S. Congressman. This is an excerpt from his autobiography, "The Long Old Road", published in 1963.

Ben Rhodes at the Seattle Public Library Central Library
KUOW Photo/John O'Brien

Ben Rhodes was a 24-year-old aspiring writer living in New York on 9/11. What happened that day made him want to be part of the response.  As you’ll hear in this talk, when his visit to an Army recruiter didn’t pan out, he looked for a way to get involved politically. 

The Seattle dog, with grilled onions and cream cheese, was born in Pioneer Square in the late 1980s. This is a Polaroid of that era.
Courtesy of Hadley Long

Mara Dillinger stood at a hot dog cart in Seattle’s Capitol Hill neighborhood, eating her fourth hot dog of the night.

Terrance Hayes.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

"In a second I'll tell you how little writing rescues." That promise, from the opening poem of Terrance Hayes' "American Sonnets for My Past and Future Assassin", is only partially kept. 

The poems in the book are in constant motion. They shuttle back and forth between Emmett Till and Maxine Waters, slavery and hip hop, the nation's future and the past it can't bear to look at. 

FILE: Therese Macisaac of Seattle joins a protest against the travel ban outside the U.S. District Court of Appeals in Seattle in 2017.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

On Tuesday, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld President Trump’s latest travel ban that barred people entering the U.S. from five majority Muslim countries as well as North Korea and Venezuela.

In the 5-4 decision, the majority opinion stated that the ban fell "squarely within the scope of Presidential authority.”

Children from the Children's Aid Society. The Children's Aid Society was founded to find homes for poor children of big Eastern cities. Its critics say that Catholic children were forcibly removed and sent to perform slave labor on Midwestern farms.
Library of Congress Photo Archives

Un-American: A word being used to describe the separations of children from their parents at the Mexican border.

History, however, suggests this is very American.

Looking To History To Combat Wildfires

Jun 14, 2018

As at least half a dozen fires in Colorado force hundreds to evacuate, and have closed a national forest, some residents say they're shocked at how quickly the fire has spread. The speed of wildfires is actually something Colorado ecologists have been studying, and they say history may provide clues on how to slow it down.

The Trump administration's policy of separating families who are detained after illegally crossing the Southern border has become a lightning rod for the White House's critics.

Hundreds of children have already been separated from their parents since Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced the policy in May — though the practice has been going on for at least several months.

The interior of the main sanctuary of Mount Zion Baptist Church is shown on Thursday, March 8, 2018, in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

What started in the 19th Century as a group of people holding church services in their homes, grew into the city's largest African American congregation.

Mount Zion Baptist Church was incorporated in 1894. This week, Mayor Jenny Durkan signed an ordinance formally designating it a historic city landmark. The city council approved the designation in May.

Infamous photographs, taken seconds after Sen. Robert F. Kennedy was shot on June 5, 1968, show him lying on the floor of the Ambassador Hotel's kitchen. A teenage busboy kneels beside him, cradling the senator's head.

That busboy was Juan Romero.

Kennedy was running for president and had just won the California Democratic primary when he was assassinated at the Los Angeles hotel.

Fred Dillon, second from left, and his son, Codi Dillon, right, return the remains of a chinook salmon to the Puyallup River after a first salmon ceremony on Tuesday in Tacoma.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

The Puyallup Tribe welcomed the first salmon of the year back to the Puyallup River in Tacoma on Tuesday.

Strangely, perhaps, that chinook's epic journey from mid-Pacific Ocean to a Puyallup fishing net begins with a sloshing tanker truck.


Proposed 'marine park' at Seattle Center, 1966
Flickr Photo/Seattle Municipal Archives (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/241yeWL

Fifty years ago, Seattle was trying to decide what do with its center attraction in the wake of the World’s Fair.

One man came forward with the idea of privately-funded plan marine park. Think SeaWorld at the heart of Seattle – complete with a captive orca to perform shows.

From left, peanuts, hog maw and chitterlings. These three dishes, as chef Edouardo Jordan explains, come from West Africa, and evolved during slavery in the Deep South.
JuneBaby Instagram/@junebabysea

Chef Edouardo Jordan brought major gold home to Seattle this week by winning two James Beard Awards. One for Best Northwest Chef, a recognition of his talent at his flagship restaurant Salare, and another for Best New Restaurant nationwide for the Ravenna eatery two blocks away, JuneBaby.

Edouardo Jordan, right, works in the kitchen at JuneBaby on Wednesday December 6, 2017, in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Seattle Chef Edouardo Jordan kept one item off his menu when he opened Salare in 2015.

“I didn’t want to put fried chicken on the menu,” Jordan said in the Netflix documentary series, “Ugly Delicious.”

Copyright 2018 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

DAVE DAVIES, HOST:

Before there was an Oregon, Idaho and Washington state, there was the Oregon Country. Early settlers and pioneers voted to form a provisional territorial government 175 years ago this week.  The vote was close and featured arguments that may sound surprisingly familiar today.

The pivotal decision will be celebrated Saturday as Founders Day at the spot where it happened in Marion County.

Drive across Oregon and it’s hard not to notice that many of the state’s steel bridges — from the foggy coast to high desert — are the same shade of sage green. It’s so ubiquitous that the paint’s manufacturer calls it “ODOT Green" after Oregon’s Department of Transportation.

But ODOT Green — a color that started a national phenomenon — is a color that almost didn’t happen: Oregon’s first green-painted bridge, the St. Johns, was initially supposed to be striped black and yellow like a bumblebee.

Artworks by Martin Whatson of Norway, center, and Kim Simonsson of Finland, right, are on display inside the Northern Exposure exhibit on Wednesday, May 2, 2018, at the new Nordic Museum in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

When you see wood smoke and naked people in Ballard, you’ll know the new Nordic Museum is finally complete. 

Larches, a staple of the North Cascades, are shown on the Pacifc Crest Trail near Cutthroat Pass.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

The North Cascades National Park turns 50 years old this year.

It's a popular place to camp and hike now, but a new book about the park's history says it got off to a rocky start. 


Elmer Dixon, left, laughs with Ben Abe, right, the current owner of the space where the Seattle Black Panther Party had their first office, while reminiscing about the location, on Wednesday, January 10, 2018, on 34th Avenue in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Madrona is a posh Seattle neighborhood with million-dollar homes. But 50 years ago, at the playground here, it was where hundreds of Black Panthers trained.

 


Bellingham, Washington, dedicates a new monument this Saturday that speaks to the Pacific Northwest's long and conflicted history with immigration. The "Arch of Healing and Reconciliation" memorializes the past expulsions of immigrant Sikhs, Japanese and Chinese.

Safety representative for the Seattle Tunnel Partners, Marisa Roddick, wears stickers on her helmet for each year that she has worked on the tunnel project, from 2013 to 2018, on Tuesday, March 27, 2018, in Seattle.
KUOW photo/Megan Farmer

When Seattle's Alaskan Way Viaduct was built in the 1950s, we didn't know much about earthquakes. California's Loma Prieta quake in 1989 opened our eyes when their viaduct collapsed and crushed 41 people. 

And when the Nisqually quake in 2001 damaged our own viaduct, it sealed the deal for officials: The viaduct had to go.

An American flag is shown between rows of headstones in the Veterans section on Thursday, March 1, 2018, at Evergreen Washelli Cemetery in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Seattle’s biggest cemetery begins with a tragic story.  

A woman walks past a large mural of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. on the side of a diner, painted by artist James Crespinel in the 1990's and later restored, along Martin Luther King Jr. Way, Tuesday, April 3, 2018, in Seattle.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Fifty years ago today, the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was murdered on a balcony in Memphis, Tennessee. Decades later, a motion passed in the King County Council to rename the county for King, rather than a slave owner from Alabama. 

Civil Rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated in 1968.
Wikimedia Commons

On April 4, 1968,  Gary Heyde had just arrived for a conference at Kentucky State College. He and more than 500 students from every major black university waited in line to register. Heyde happened to be the only white student there.

No more than 20 minutes had passed when a girl came running into the lobby where conference-goers waited to register. “They’ve killed Martin,” she screamed.

At first, the room was cloaked in complete and total silence. Then chaos ensued.

The George Washington statue on the University of Washington Seattle campus.
Flickr Photo/Chris Blakeley (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1jEzCcs

Bill Radke talks to historian, author and former This American Life contributor Sarah Vowell about America's troubled history and how it can better help us understand today. 

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