history

One of the most famous sights on the University of Washington Seattle campus is when the cherry trees bloom in the quad each spring.
Flickr Photo/Michael Matti (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds takes a tour of the University of Washington campus with Antoinette Wills and John Bolcer, co-authors of the new book "The University of Washington," which tells the 119 year history of the campus through the buildings. They talk about a 1960s bombing at UW that remains a great unsolved mystery and the story behind the strange stone faces atop all the buildings in the liberal arts Quad.

This week in 1941, Japanese forces attacked Pearl Harbor. Over the next few years, millions of Americans would leave home to fight in Europe and the Pacific. They had few comforts and little in the way of escape or entertainment — at least not until American publishers got involved.

Courtesy Knute Berger

On November 11, 2014, Washington celebrated its 125th anniversary of statehood. As part of the celebration, new artifacts representing the state’s history and culture will be added to the Washington Centennial Time Capsule located at the state capitol in Olympia. 

The Keepers of the Capsule have invited KUOW to submit stories from our archive that best represent Washington from the past 25 years. The capsule is added to every 25 years until Washington state’s 500th anniversary in 2389. 

Conjoined skulls? The digestive tract of a jellyfish? Museums can feature some weird displays.
Flickr Photo/Rooney Wimms (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to Victoria Cain, author of the book "Life On Display: Revolutionizing Museums Of Science And Natural History In The United States," about the relationships museums have had with odd and bizarre artifacts.

On Sunday, five St. Louis Rams players jogged onto the field with their arms raised by their heads, a stream of fog behind them: hands up, don't shoot.

The players — Tavon Austin, Kenny Britt, Jared Cook, Chris Givens and Stedman Bailey — were invoking the gesture that's been widely used in protesting the shooting death of 18-year-old Michael Brown by police officer Darren Wilson. This followed the announcement that a grand jury would not indict Wilson in Brown's death, and the release of a hefty batch of evidence shown to the jury by St. Louis prosecutor Robert McCullough.

Isoseismal map of the event.
Wikimedia Commons

In 1872, a mass earthquake rocked the Northwest. It’s on record as one of the most widely felt temblors in the Pacific Northwest.

But the location of the fault line that caused the quake has been a mystery for more than a century. They didn’t even know which side of the Cascades the fault fell.

Thomas Jefferson memorial in Washington, D.C.
Flickr Photo/Wally Gobetz (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Time travel is a perennial fascination. Where would you go? Who would you meet? The website Ranker places Thomas Jefferson in the top ten of popular figures, just behind Winston Churchill and ahead of John Kennedy. 

Our guest in this episode of Speakers Forum is adept at a kind of time travel. Clay Jenkinson inhabited the role of President Thomas Jefferson at Town Hall Seattle on November 22. He was joined by the Saint Michael Trio for a performance of chamber music popular during Jefferson’s lifetime, including works by Mozart, Haydn, and Beethoven, who were Jefferson’s contemporaries.

Wikimedia Commons

Ross Reynolds talks with Jon Talton, economics columnist for the Seattle Times, about the legacy of the Battle in Seattle.

Courtesy Jason Yeatman

Two years ago Jason Yeatman, a researcher at the University of Washington, stumbled into a secret corridor of the mind.

For decades, a graphic letter sent from J. Edgar Hoover's FBI to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was thought to only exist in a censored form. The letter focused on King's sex life and his extramarital affairs. Yale historian Beverly Gage, who's working on a biography of Hoover, recently uncovered an unredacted version of the letter at the National Archives. It begins:

"King,

Washington state is 125 years old. There was a celebration Tuesday at the state capitol. It featured an historic reenactment, a time capsule ceremony and, of course, cake.

German Architecture.org

Ross Reynolds speaks with Peter Schneider, author of "Berlin Now," about the vast changes there since the fall of the Berlin Wall 25 years ago this month.

Remember Washington's 2004 Election Soap Opera?

Nov 4, 2014
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

If you can’t remember the details of the 2004 Washington state governor’s race, you shouldn’t feel bad. It was pretty complicated and had more twists and turns than a soap opera.

Flickr Photo/Andy Nash (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with activist Elizabeth Campbell about her voter initiative to fund planning to build a monorail line in Seattle. Then, Reynolds talks with Crosscut's Knute Berger about the political history of the monorail.

Wikipedia Photo/Nancy Wong

Ross Reynolds interviews Matt Bai, national political correspondent for Yahoo News, about his book on the Gary Hart debacle.

If you know who Hart is, you probably remember his flame-out campaign for president. In 1987 the Democratic Senator from Colorado was running against George H.W. Bush was ahead by double digits. But when the Miami Herald ran a story about a supposed affair Hart was having with model Donna Rice, his campaign fell apart within a week. 

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