history

Performing Arts
2:22 pm
Fri July 18, 2014

The Racial Undertones Of 'The Mikado'

'The Mikado' presented by Metro Theatre, Vancouver, in 2014.
Flickr Photo/Metro Theatre Vancouver (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Jeannie Yandel talks to Josephine Lee, English and Asian American studies professor at the University of Minnesota, about the checkered history of the Gilbert and Sullivan's "The Mikado."

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History
2:49 pm
Thu July 17, 2014

Washington's Last Waltz With Ending Prohibition

Ross Reynolds talks to Redmond Barnett, head of the exhibits department for the Washington State Historical Society, about what happened the last time the state lifted prohibition.

Dental Work
3:07 pm
Wed July 16, 2014

This Dirty Little Weed May Have Cleaned Up Ancient Teeth

This young male, buried at a prehistoric site in Central Sudan, probably munched on the roots of a plant called purple nutsedge.
Donatella Usai Centro Studi Sudanesi and Sub-Sahariani

Originally published on Wed July 16, 2014 5:52 pm

The menus of millennia past can be tough to crack, especially when it comes to fruits and vegetables. For archaeologists studying a prehistoric site in Sudan, dental plaque provided a hint.

"When you eat, you get this kind of film of dental plaque over your teeth," says Karen Hardy, an archaeologist with the Catalan Institute for Research and Advanced Studies at the Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona.

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Author Interview
3:28 pm
Tue July 15, 2014

It's Time We All Embrace Contrarian History

Ross Reynolds talks with Ilan Stavans about his new book, “A Most Imperfect Union: A Contrarian History of the United States."

History
2:06 am
Mon July 14, 2014

Firemen's Ball Ushers In France's Bastille Day

Originally published on Mon July 14, 2014 9:34 am

On this day in 1789, crowds stormed the Bastille prison, where the king kept his enemies. The monarchy was overthrown in a revolution.

Author Interview
2:52 pm
Fri July 11, 2014

Susan Jacoby Says You Should Know Who Robert Ingersoll Is

David Hyde talks with author Susan Jacoby about her new book, "The Great Agnostic: Robert Ingersoll and American Freethought," the story of a historic figure for the separation of church and state.

Soccer History
2:45 pm
Fri July 11, 2014

When 'The Beautiful Game' Was Chaotic And Dangerous

Marcie Sillman talks with University of Washington professor Joe Janes about the original rules of soccer, published in 1863.

History
2:13 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

Potsdamer Square's Revitalization Since The Fall Of The Berlin Wall 25 Years Ago

Potsdamer Square, 1965
Credit German Architecture.org

Ross Reynolds speaks with Peter Schneider, author of "Berlin Now," about the vast changes there since the fall of the Berlin Wall 25 years ago this November.

The two spoke in  Potsdamer Square, which in the 1920s was Berlin's Times Square.

But it was bombed to rubble during World War II.

In 1962 the Berlin Wall, dominated by a wide "kill zone," was built right down the middle of the square. 

Following the fall of the wall in 1989, Potsdamer was reborn. It has become once again a Berlin landmark.

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Environment
2:44 pm
Tue July 8, 2014

History Of The EPA: From Bipartisan To Polarized

Marcie Sillman talks with Georgetown law professor Lisa Heinzerling about the history of the Environmental Protection Agency, and the change of its scope over time. 

Author Interview
3:26 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

The Story Of Joseph Smith: Founder Of The Mormon Church

David Hyde talks to Alex Beam about his new book "American Crucifixion: The Murder of Joseph Smith and The Fate of The Modern Church."

Music History
4:57 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

'Imbecile Slush': Surprising Early Reactions To Crooning

Crooner Bing Crosby in 1942.
Credit From Wikipedia

In 1932, a new singing style was emerging: crooning. What we might consider easy listening now wasn't necessarily received cordially by its contemporaries. Cardinal O'Connell of Boston described it as "imbecile slush" and "a degenerate form of singing.”

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This Not Just In
12:26 pm
Wed July 2, 2014

The Night A Fire Silenced KOMO's Airwaves

Fisher Plaza, KOMO's headquarters, on a particularly rainy Seattle day.
Credit Credit Wikimedia Commons

On the night of Thursday, July 2, 2009, the 4th of July weekend was underway.

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Audio Postcard
10:16 am
Fri June 27, 2014

Postcard From Germany: Across The Street From The Gestapo Headquarters

One section of the Berlin Wall has been transformed into the East Side Gallery, with artworks by a variety of artists from around the world.
KUOW Photo/Ross Reynolds

While visiting Germany for a journalism fellowship, KUOW’s Ross Reynolds reports on what's changed and what's stayed the same in the 25 years since the fall of the Berlin Wall.

WWI Anniversary
1:20 pm
Thu June 26, 2014

A Century From Archduke's Death, Spotlight Turns Back To Bosnia

Originally published on Thu June 26, 2014 4:10 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

People from around the world are in Sarajevo this week to mark 100 years since the gunshot that changed history. On June 28, 1914, a young assassin killed Archduke Franz Ferdinand, triggering the First World War. Bosnia is hosting concerts, conferences and art exhibitions to mark the centenary. NPR's Ari Shapiro reports from Sarajevo on what locals make of the big commemoration.

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Author Interview
3:04 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

'A Very Principled Boy': The Story Of A Soviet Spy That Switched Sides

Credit Mark Bradley's book "A Very Principled Boy.'

David Hyde talks to author Mark Bradley about his book, "A Very Principled Boy." It's the story of Duncan Lee, who became a spy for the Soviet Union only to switch allegiance back to the United States later in his life.

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