history

Bard's Words
9:18 am
Wed April 23, 2014

It's A Foregone Conclusion That You Are Quoting Shakespeare

Flickr Photo/Calamity Meg (CC-BY-NC-ND)

To celebrate William Shakespeare’s 450th birthday, Christopher Gaze takes a moment to remind you how the great playwright lives in the way you talk. Gaze is the artistic director of the annual Bard on the Beach festival in Vancouver, British Columbia.

Radio Retrospective
9:15 am
Thu April 17, 2014

Female Pioneer Credited With Bringing Sound Effects To Radio

Ora Nichols, left, works on the sound effects for "The March of Time" news reenactment.
From Wikipedia

It’s no secret that radio in the early days was a man’s game. Men were the directors, the producers, the composers and the sound effect technicians. But it was a woman who was a major influence in the sound effects profession.

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Documentary
3:40 pm
Tue April 15, 2014

Ken Burns On 'The Greatest Speech In American History'

Greenwood School student, Pasha, reciting the Gettysburg Address in Ken Burns' latest documentary.
Credit PBS/Ken Burns

Ross Reynolds talks with filmmaker Ken Burns about his new documentary, "The Address."

The film captures the story of a school for boys with learning differences and disabilities in Vermont where the students are encouraged to recite President Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address.

This Not Just In
3:23 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

Mixed Reaction To Lincoln's Death On West Coast

Abraham Lincoln was the 16th President of the United States. He died on April 15, 1865.
Credit Wikipedia/Alexander Gardner

On that Saturday afternoon, April 15, 1865, the news reached Seattle by telegraph. President Abraham Lincoln was shot dead by an assassin at Ford’s Theatre on Good Friday evening.

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Steinbeck's Classic
7:24 am
Mon April 14, 2014

'Grapes Of Wrath' Is 75, But Its Depictions Of Poverty Are Timeless

Dust Bowl farmer drives a tractor with his son near Cland, N.M. (1938). Steinbeck writes: "The tractors came over the roads and into the fields, great crawlers moving like insects, having the incredible strength of insects ... monsters raising the dust and sticking their snouts into it, straight down the country ... through fences, through dooryards, in and out of gullies in straight lines."
Dorothea Lange Library of Congress

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 1:42 pm

Much has been said and written about the Dust Bowl, but if you want to get a visceral feel for how it all began and the way it affected the people who experienced it, you need go no further than the opening pages of John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath:

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A Leader's Legacy
3:48 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

Billy Frank Jr.: Tribes Must Try To Bring The Salmon Back

Billy Frank Jr., known for his decades of defending Washington tribes’ treaty rights, fears the rights will be worthless as overfishing, dams and climate change take their toll on the habitats salmon need to survive. Photo taken in August 2012.
Credit EarthFix Photo/Katie Campbell

Billy Frank Jr. helped secure Indian fishing rights through protest and legal action in the 1960s and '70s. The 83-year-old Nisqually tribe member has been arrested about 50 times over the years; the first time was in 1945 when he was 14, for fishing.

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Wanapum Dam
8:17 am
Thu April 10, 2014

Keeping Bones, Cultural Artifacts Safe In Central Washington Is Proving Costly

File photo. Sheriff's deputies, Grant County employees and state Fish and Wildlife officers are patrolling 80 miles of Columbia River shore.
Anna King Northwest News Network

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 4:07 pm

The drawdown of water behind Wanapum Dam in central Washington is exposing dozens of human gravesites and hundreds of Native American cultural artifacts.

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Justice
2:11 pm
Wed April 9, 2014

An Eye For An Eye: Did It Make The World Blind?

Credit Thane Rosenbaum's book, "Payback."

Steve Scher talks with Thane Rosenbaum, author of "Payback: The Case For Revenge," about how we view the phrase "an eye for an eye" and the role of revenge in our current justice system.

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Opera History
9:18 am
Wed April 9, 2014

Denied A Stage, She Sang For A Nation

Contralto Marian Anderson sang at the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, April 9, 1939, to an estimated crowd of 75,000 people.
University of Pennsylvania

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 11:08 am

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Rwanda Genocide
1:28 pm
Tue April 8, 2014

Remembering Rwandans Who Followed Their Conscience

Godleaves Mukamunana, left, hid Domitil Mukakumuranga, in her house for weeks so that Hutu militias wouldn't kill her. "Seeing her alive is the best thing," Mukamunana says. "That kind of relationship we have is priceless. The fact that I don't have more like her --€” those who were killed — that's what's hurting."
Gregory Warner NPR

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 2:24 am

Olive Mukankusi lives in a two-room house with mud walls and a dirt floor in a village called Igati, in eastern Rwanda's Rwamagana province. To get there, you have to drive about 30 minutes down a dirt road.

It's there, in her home, on a warm and sunny afternoon, that she tells a story that she's only told three times in 20 years: first to a local judge, then to an American genocide researcher — and now.

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Pot Debate
9:54 am
Mon April 7, 2014

Roger Roffman On Marijuana Legalization

Roger Roffman is a professor emeritus of social work at the University of Washington.
Credit KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Ross Reynolds talks with academic and activist Roger Roffman about his involvement with marijuana and public policy for 45 years. His latest book is "Marijuana Nation: One Man’s Chronicle of America Getting High: From Vietnam to Legalization."

History
3:10 pm
Fri April 4, 2014

Gary Heyde On Martin Luther King Jr.'s Assassination

Martin Luther King Jr.
Credit Flickr Photo/Digital Collections, UIC Library (CC BY-NC-ND)

Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated 46 years ago today — on April 4, 1968. Former Seattle teacher and novelist Gary Heyde remembers that day well. It was the day he learned one of the most important lessons of his life, but he almost didn't survive to apply the lesson.

This archive originally aired in October 2011.

Food
3:11 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

Extra Virginity: Historical Toil Of Olive Oil

Credit Tom Mueller's book, "Extra Virginity."

Marcie Sillman talks with author Tom Mueller about his book, "Extra Virginity: The Sublime and Scandalous World of Olive Oil."

Reporter's Notebook
10:16 am
Thu April 3, 2014

Remembering The Day Kurt Cobain's Music Died

Krist Novoselic and Kurt Cobain, "Nevermind" release at Beehive Records in Seattle on Sept. 16, 1991.
Courtesy of Charles Peterson

It was 20 years ago, but I remember it clearly: April 8, 1994, the day the world found out that Nirvana front man Kurt Cobain was dead.

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Sports History
1:53 pm
Mon March 31, 2014

The Untold Story Of African American Baseball In Washington State

Credit Flickr Photo/gfpeck (CC BY-NC-ND)

Steve Scher talks with Chieko Phillips, exhibitions manager at the Northwest African American Museum, about its new exhibit, "Pitch Black: African American Baseball in Washington."

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