Hillary Clinton | KUOW News and Information

Hillary Clinton

The Democratic Party about to nominate a historic candidate. That candidate's opponent not ready to accept that reality.

Bernie Sanders?

No, Hillary Clinton in 2008.

Hillary Clinton channeled a little bit of Donald Trump in San Diego on Thursday afternoon, delivering a blistering attack on her likely Republican opponent's qualifications to run the country.

"Making Donald Trump our commander in chief would be a historic mistake," Clinton told a cheering, and at times laughing, audience.

If D.C.'s builders put parlors into overpriced luxury apartments and condos — and, we guess, if people played games in them — the city's current favorite parlor game would be figuring out who likely Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump would pick for their running mates.

If you've been following the Democratic presidential contest, you might be wondering how it is possible that Bernie Sanders seems to have all the energy and enthusiasm and, yet, Hillary Clinton is way ahead in the race to the nomination.

A listener named Gerard Allen wrote into the NPR Politics Podcast with an observation:

During a recent speech before the National Rifle Association, Donald Trump was explicit about the voters he's reaching out to: "I will say, my poll numbers with men are through the roof, but I like women more than men. Come on, women. Let's go. Come on."

Presidential candidate Donald Trump, pictured here 2013 Conservative Political Action Conference.
Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/e41ELr

Emily Fox talks with reporter Reid Wilson about the national impact of Washington's presidential primary. Reid is chief political correspondent with Morning Consult, a Washington, D.C. based publication.

During her tenure as secretary of state, Hillary Clinton violated department policies when she used a personal email account to conduct official business, a new report from the Office of the Inspector General for the State Department found.

The report, which was obtained by NPR's Susan Davis ahead of its public release, reads:

As a former senator and secretary of state, Hillary Clinton has a long foreign policy track record. That record suggests she'd be more hawkish than President Obama — and many of her fellow Democrats. But don't expect her to go overboard. She knows all too well the political price that can come with military intervention.

Here are four things to know about Clinton's approach to foreign policy:

Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign raised $26.4 million last month, beating the campaign of Sen. Bernie Sanders financially for the first time in 2016.

Sanders has routinely outpaced Clinton in fundraising this year thanks to a dedicated base of small donors. But these latest numbers indicate a political pivot; Clinton's fundraising is accelerating while Sanders' is slowing.

Bill Clinton on Friday stopped short of saying he was sorry for a recent clash with Black Lives Matter protesters. Instead, the former president tried to make the squabble into a teachable moment.

"I did something yesterday in Philadelphia I almost want to apologize for, but I want to use it as an example of the danger threatening our country," he told the crowd at a Hillary Clinton campaign event in Erie, Pa.

This post has been updated at 10 a.m. ET, April 8

In a prolonged exchange Thursday afternoon, former President Bill Clinton forcefully defended his 1994 crime bill to Black Lives Matter protesters in the crowd at a Hillary Clinton campaign event.

He said the bill lowered the country's crime rate, which benefited African-Americans, achieved bipartisan support, and diversified the police force. He then addressed a protester's sign, saying:

Ross Reynolds interviews Mara Liasson at a KUOW event on March 31, 2016.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Ross Reynolds interviews Mara Liasson, NPR’s national political correspondent. She’s covered presidential elections since 1992 and was  NPR's White House correspondent for all eight years of the Bill Clinton administration. In this conversation on March 31, she talks about the dilemma Donald Trump poses the Republican Party and the prospects of a showdown between Trump and Hillary Clinton for president.

Precinct volunteers count caucus votes at Martin Luther King Jr. Elementary School in Seattle on Saturday, March 26. Democrats turned out across the state to support Bernie Sanders or Hillary Clinton.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders defeated Hillary Clinton by a wide margin Saturday in Washington state's Democratic caucuses, according to party results.

Niah, April and Jasmyne Sims pose outside Safeco Field before the Bernie Sanders rally Friday in Seattle.
KUOW photo/John O'Brien

Bernie Sanders hit familiar themes in his ballpark appearance in Seattle Friday.

The presidential candidate spoke to thousands of people at his second Seattle appearance in less than a week. People lined up outside Safeco Field hours ahead of the rally.

Neighbors and protesters greet Hillary Clinton's motorcade as the candidate arrives at a private fundraiser in Medina, Washington.
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

If campaign contributions are any indicator, Washington state is "feeling the Bern."

People here have given Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders 30 percent more money than they have to his Democratic opponent Hillary Clinton through the end of February. Sanders' $2.6 million Washington war chest is more than all Republican candidates combined have received from the state.

Andy Hurst talks with volunteers at Bernie Sanders' campaign office in Seattle's Capitol Hill neighborhood. We also hear from Hillary Clinton volunteers at a phone-banking event in Seattle's Mt. Baker neighborhood.

The sign for Rainier Brewing Company, brewed in Seattle from 1878 to 1999. The company is now owned by Pabst Brewing Company. Since Rainier left the city, however, micro and nano brewers have popped up in the city.
Flickr Photo/Wonderlane (CC By 2.0)

If Larry Adams, a bartender at Blue Moon Tavern, were serving Bernie Sanders, he’d give him cider. A can of Schilling, because that’s what they have there.

Hillary Clinton makes her case at the Boeing Machinists union hall in Everett on Tuesday afternoon.
KUOW PHOTO/ANN DORNFELD

Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton campaigned across the Seattle area on Tuesday, saying she’d work to restore U.S. manufacturing jobs and making a pitch for support in Washington’s Democratic caucuses.

Bernie Or Hillary? This Quiz Will Help You Decide

Mar 21, 2016
Andrea Hidalgo, left, and Monal Shah, 29, were both undecided on Wednesday evening. Like many undecideds, they said they like Bernie Sanders' ideals but believed Hillary Clinton would more likely be able to get progressive measures passed.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

How could Democrats be undecided at this point in the presidential race?

The GOP presidential field dropped by one candidate on Tuesday night, but Republicans are still no closer to uniting behind a nominee.

Democrats, however, did get more clarity as Hillary Clinton racked up more wins over Bernie Sanders, extending her delegate lead and complicating the Vermont senator's nomination calculation.

The results from Tuesday's four primary and caucus states are in: three wins for Trump, one each for Clinton and Cruz, and one surprising, narrow victory for Sanders.

Bernie Sanders' tight win over Hillary Clinton in Michigan is the biggest news out of Tuesday night's presidential nomination races. Though Clinton had led consistently in recent polls, Sanders won by less than 2 percentage points with 99 percent of precincts reporting.

Hillary Clinton won the South Carolina Democratic primary on Saturday, notching a decisive win in a state where she suffered a devastating loss just eight years ago.

The Associated Press called the race for the former secretary of state over rival Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders just seconds after the polls closed at 7 p.m. ET. With all precincts reporting, Clinton beat Sanders by nearly 50 points, winning 73.5 percent to 26 percent.

Hillary Clinton will win the Nevada Democratic caucuses, the Associated Press is reporting.

With 84 percent of the precincts reporting, Clinton has 52.5 percent of the vote, compared to Sen. Bernie Sanders' 47.5 percent.

"Tens of thousands of men and women with kids to raise, bills to pay, and dreams that won't die — this is your campaign," she told a crowd at Caesar's Palace in Las Vegas. "And it is a campaign to break down every barrier that holds you back."

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaking with supporters at a town hall meeting at Hillside Middle School in Manchester, New Hampshire on Jan. 22, 2016.
Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/Cvop2D

Bill Radke speaks with local journalist Erica C. Barnett and Jess Spear of Socialist Alternative about who a feminist should support in the 2016 Democratic primary. 

It seems everybody loves Beyoncé. But not everyone can say her name.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton was asked about the performer Wednesday by an audience member at a town hall in Iowa: "If you could choose, would you rather be the president or Beyoncé?"

Hillary Clinton was on NBC's Saturday Night Live during the 2008 campaign and appeared alongside Amy Poehler, her alter ego on the show.

They poked through the facade. Clinton went on as herself, wearing the same pantsuit as Poehler, who feigned awkwardness about sharing the screen with the woman she mocked weekly (though Poehler and Clinton say they are friends in real life).

Last night, Clinton again appeared on SNL — on the season premiere.

There is always a tension between the press and the candidates they cover. Journalists want access, and want to ask questions. Campaigns want to control the message. Over time, that has especially been true with Hillary Clinton.

Many Americans have a pre-formed opinion of Hillary Clinton, who is expected to announce her candidacy for president this weekend. Call it a blessing — or, simply, an inevitable effect — of being in the public eye for so long. But Clinton has long implied that the public perception of her is all wrong.

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