Hillary Clinton | KUOW News and Information

Hillary Clinton

Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton is coming under fire for her claim that FBI Director James Comey said her past statements about the use of emails were "truthful" and that she never sent or received classified materials from her personal server.

The email issue, which has dogged the Clinton campaign for months, was brought up again during a sit-down interview with Fox News Sunday host Chris Wallace. During the interview Wallace played video of Clinton saying:

Democratic vice presidential nominee Tim Kaine clarified Sunday that his position on abortion rights is unmoved, despite top Clinton campaign aides' recent assertions otherwise.

"My voting position on abortion hasn't really changed," Kaine told CNN. "I support the Hyde Amendment. I haven't changed that."

The Democratic National Convention is over. Here are some of the big takeaways from a week in Philadelphia that had more suspense and drama than expected.

The Democrats Are Really, Really Good At This

Just like Barack Obama's two conventions, this one was flawlessly choreographed. Even the revolt of the Bernie Bros had a more-or-less happy ending.

Hillary Clinton accepted her party's nomination on Thursday, completing the field for an American political campaign without historical precedent.

Clinton, the first female presidential nominee for a major American party, has now officially become Republican Donald Trump's Democratic rival for the presidency of the United States.

At the Democratic National Convention this week, Bernie Sanders announced that his successful rival, Hillary Clinton, had adopted one of his most popular proposals: Free tuition at public colleges.

Senator Patty Murray in the KUOW offices, Jan. 2016.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

David Hyde talks with Sen. Patty Murray about Hillary Clinton's historic nomination for president. Murray speaks Thursday night at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia.

UW student Varisha Khan at the Democratic National Convention in July
KUOW PHOTO/David Hyde

Hillary Clinton may not be the first woman to run for president. Victoria Woodhull did that back in 1872, on the Equal Rights Party ticket with Frederick Douglass.

But Hillary Clinton is the first to be nominated by a major political party. And that’s a big deal for a number of women from Washington state in Philadelphia for the Democratic National Convention.

Nick Vaidyanathan of Seattle joined the protest inside the Democratic National Convention on Wednesday night.
KUOW PHOTO/DAVID HYDE

Nick Vaidyanathan of Seattle helped shout down former CIA director Leon Panetta at the Democratic National Convention on Wednesday night – and he's not sorry about it.

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaking with supporters at a town hall meeting at Hillside Middle School in Manchester, New Hampshire on Jan. 22, 2016.
Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/Cvop2D

Twelve women have run for president – ever.

That’s partly because women didn’t get the right to vote until 1919. But Margaret O’Mara, professor of history at the University of Washington, said that’s also because we view the presidency as a hyper masculine office.

There was no script for the protest Tuesday night by Bernie supporters, who walked out after Hillary Clinton's formal nomination and jammed the media center.
KUOW PHOTO/KATE WALTERS

If you compare the tone of the Republican convention with Bill Clinton's speech on Tuesday night and Michelle Obama's two nights ago, you could argue that the Democrats are more positive.

But that’s what you see on stage. These are giant theatrical productions.

Washington delegate Pamela Eakes at the convention in Philadelphia: 'Young girls right now can look up and they're going to see a president who is a mother, a woman.'
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Hillary Clinton made history Tuesday night when she became the first woman nominated for president by a major party.

The moment drew mixed emotions from Washington state delegates. Many were ecstatic. Hillary delegate Pam Eakes danced on the floor and yelled, "This is it."

The Democratic National Convention made history Tuesday evening: Amid applause, shouts, cheers and in some cases tears, the delegates on the floor of the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia nominated Hillary Clinton for president of the United States.

Clinton is now the first female presidential candidate of a major American party.

Delegates and protesters share a ride to the Democratic Convention Tuesday. Protesters were asked to disembark a stop before the convention.
KUOW Photo/Kate Walters

Democrats woke up Tuesday morning still aglow from Michelle Obama's epic address at the convention Monday evening.

It was a useful distraction from the ongoing tension with staunch Bernie Sanders supporters. Some have come around to Hillary Clinton, but protesters continued demonstrating in Philadelphia.

Boos from Bernie Sanders supporters drowned out U.S. Rep. Marcia Fudge, the convention chair, when she mentioned Hillary Clinton on Monday.
KUOW photo/David Hyde

If you want to have the Hillary Clinton-Bernie Sanders divide explained in two sound bites, you could do worse than Jack Smith and Pamela Eakes.

State Rep. Noel Frame on giving Bernie supporters some space: "Frankly it's a little bit of a grieving process. And I think we need to understand and respect that."
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

It was an all-star cast as the Democratic National Convention kicked off last night in Philadelphia.

Al Franken. Sarah Silverman. Cory Booker. Michelle Obama. Bernie Sanders.

And Washington state’s delegation heard their messages for Sanders’ supporters: Unite, and vote for Hillary Clinton.


Jonathan Tong, a school teacher from Kenmore, traveled to Philadelphia to protest outside the Democratic National Convention.
KUOW Photo/Kate Walters

Bill Radke speaks with KUOW's David Hyde about growing protests outside the Democratic Convention in Philadelphia. Radke also speaks with protester Jonathan Tong, a school teacher from Kenmore, Washington. 

While many pundits and political observers were quick to praise Hillary Clinton's pick of Tim Kaine as her running mate on Friday, the choice wasn't met with universal acclaim.

One important group — progressives and backers of Clinton's former rival, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders — were not as pleased with the selection of the Virginia senator who has cultivated a reputation of working across the aisle over the course of his political career.

5 Things To Know About Tim Kaine

Jul 22, 2016

After weeks of speculation, Hillary Clinton's campaign has announced she will tap Tim Kaine as her running mate.

Attorney General Loretta Lynch, accepting the recommendation of FBI Director James Comey and others in the Department of Justice, is formally closing the investigation of Hillary Clinton's private email server without bringing any criminal charges.

The investigation centered on the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee's use of the server while she was secretary of state. Lynch announced the decision in a statement Wednesday, saying Comey and "career prosecutors and agents" unanimously recommended that the investigation be closed without charges.

Tuesday was a mixed bag for Hillary Clinton.

She escaped a recommendation of an indictment from the FBI, removing the biggest storm cloud over her in this presidential campaign.

But it did not come without significant pain for Clinton, because while FBI Director James Comey did not recommend a formal indictment to the Department of Justice, he served up an indictment of her judgment.

No president has campaigned strongly for his chosen successor in at least 100 years.

Tuesday's event, with President Obama campaigning for Hillary Clinton, his former secretary of state and onetime rival, in North Carolina is remarkable for that reason. It kicks off what is likely to be a season of vigorous campaigning by the president.

The FBI interviewed Hillary Clinton for the probe into her use of a private email server while she was Secretary of State on Saturday morning, according to a spokesman for Clinton.

Spokesman Nick Merrill said in a statement that the interview about her email arrangements was "voluntary" and adds, "She is pleased to have had the opportunity to assist the Department of Justice in bringing this review to a conclusion."

He says Clinton will not comment further about the interview "out of respect for the investigative process."

Local Seattle comedians Anica Cihla, Abraham Tadesse, Christan Leonard and Billy Anderson outside Jai Thai on Capitol Hill.
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

The top two presidential candidates are pretty unpopular this year, with some of the highest unfavorable numbers in decades.  

But comedians and impressionists like Kate McKinnon as a maniacal Hillary Clinton or DanaCarvey as a supervillain Donald Trump seem to be enjoying themselves.

"I mean I'm not saying I want Donald Trump to be president,” Carvey said. “But I never want to live in a world where Donald Trump isn't running for president."


The House Benghazi Committee has released its findings on the Sept. 11, 2012, attack on the U.S. diplomatic compound in Libya.

The 800-page report found that despite President Obama and then Defense Secretary Leon Panetta's "clear orders," the military failed to immediately send a force to Benghazi and that nothing was en route to Libya at the time the last two Americans were killed — almost eight hours after the attacks began.

During a speech in Columbus, Ohio, on Tuesday, presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton launched a major attack on the economic record of her Republican rival, Donald Trump.

The speech went over some by-now familiar ground about Trump's business record, as well as his controversial positions on issues such as government debt and the minimum wage.

And at one point, Clinton took on Trump's views about women in the workforce.

Donald Trump's latest fundraising figures are eye-popping.

No, not because they're great. Rather, they're abysmal. The fundraising gap between Trump and Hillary Clinton is the biggest disparity to kick off a campaign in recent history, as the New York Times reported.

Hillary Clinton delivered a stinging indictment Tuesday of both Donald Trump's business record and his economic policy prescriptions, an early effort to undermine what the business mogul has billed as one of his chief qualifications for the White House.

"We can't let him bankrupt America like we are one of his failed casinos," Clinton told supporters at an alternative high school in Columbus, Ohio. "We can't let him roll the dice with our children's futures."

Washington Democrats are gathering this weekend in Tacoma for their state convention. Just like with the state Republican convention in Pasco last month, Democrats are a party divided. Hillary Clinton is the presumptive nominee. But Bernie Sanders supporters represent the majority of delegates.

In the wake of the deadliest mass shooting in U.S. history, Hillary Clinton told NPR that in order to counter "self-radicalization," she wanted to create a team "exclusively dedicated to detecting and preventing lone wolf attacks" and possibly even expand terrorist watch lists.

She also called for creating more "integrated intelligence use" among local, state and national law enforcement; "strengthening communication" with other countries; and working with Silicon Valley to "prevent online radicalization."

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