hiking

Hikers who complete the whole 2,650-mile Pacific Crest Trail say the only thing they talk about more than their aching feet is food. They have to carry it all, except when they get surprised by a little trail magic – like what happens near California's Sonora Pass.

EarthFix Photo/Katie Campbell

If you’re out one day hunting or wander off a hiking trail, a select group of volunteers may come to look for you. K-9 search and rescue teams spend countless hours training for just such an emergency.

The close proximity of a group of mountains known as The Rattles to the the Tri-Cities in southeast Washington, means urban dwellers can hike a 1,500 foot peak and enjoy dramatic views on their lunch break -- or even after supper.

A search effort for a missing hiker at Craters of the Moon National Monument in Idaho is turning to drone technology for help.

Updated Oct. 18 to include comments from BioLite.

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Some hikers are opting to take their cell phones along with them on the trail, for safety reasons or for documenting their adventures. In this interview, one hiker even upgraded his phone while on the trail.
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