hiking

Conservationists in Washington’s Tri-Cities are nearing a deal to secure a trail right-of-way on a scenic peak. That would get closer to the goal of establishing a 20-mile trail that could offer sunny, dry hiking at times of year when most trails elsewhere in the Northwest are muddy or snow covered.

U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack announced a key step Friday in completing a 1,200 mile trail from Glacier National Park to the Pacific Ocean.

Hikers already use what's called the "Pacific Northwest Trail," but it has gaps, and isn't fully built out.

Vilsack has named 23 advisers to help finalize the trail corridor, including Jon Knechtel with the Pacific Northwest Trail Association.

When people go hiking these days, all kinds of gadgets can help guide their way. But historically, humans used something a lot more low-tech: a pile of rocks.

The piles, technically called cairns, have marked trails for millennia, but in recent years, these stones have become steeped in controversy.

To Beth Dinet, stacking stones provides "an overwhelming sense of peace, and connecting with onenness."

If you’ve hiked anywhere in the Northwest, there’s a good chance you’ve seen an illegal trail. Often they’re quick shortcuts or paths to off-trail viewpoints. But in extreme cases, they’re longer, surreptitiously constructed paths that wind through public and private land.

The unauthorized trails can cause a range of problems in wild areas. As more and more people spend time in the woods, closing down these illegal trails has become increasingly difficult.

A pair of experienced long distance hikers are more than halfway through a full traverse of the Pacific Crest Trail - in the dead of winter.

Hikers who complete the whole 2,650-mile Pacific Crest Trail say the only thing they talk about more than their aching feet is food. They have to carry it all, except when they get surprised by a little trail magic – like what happens near California's Sonora Pass.

EarthFix Photo/Katie Campbell

If you’re out one day hunting or wander off a hiking trail, a select group of volunteers may come to look for you. K-9 search and rescue teams spend countless hours training for just such an emergency.

The close proximity of a group of mountains known as The Rattles to the the Tri-Cities in southeast Washington, means urban dwellers can hike a 1,500 foot peak and enjoy dramatic views on their lunch break -- or even after supper.

A search effort for a missing hiker at Craters of the Moon National Monument in Idaho is turning to drone technology for help.

Updated Oct. 18 to include comments from BioLite.

In our Weekly Innovation blog series, we explore an interesting idea, design or product that you may not have heard of yet. Do you have an innovation to share? Use this quick form to send it to us.

Flickr Photo/David Grant

The M’s Mid-Season Report
Halfway through the major league baseball season, the Seattle Mariners have taken their fans on quite the wild ride. Long losing streaks, winning streaks and a whole bunch of injuries. But recently, there have been some glimmers of hope. Young players like Nick Franklin and Brad Miller have ignited the M’s offense. And Raul Ibanez is on the verge of breaking the record of hitting the most home runs by a 41-year-old. So what’s in store for the M’s the rest of this season? Larry Stone, who covers major league baseball for the Seattle Times, is here to discuss the rest of the season.

Living Well With Parkinson's
Medicine is making great advancements in the fight against Parkinson’s disease, even though there is still no cure. Advancements in gene therapy and a unique brain surgery are extending lives. But, it’s not just technology that’s helping patients, holistic medicine is also playing a role. A leading neurological researcher and one of her patients join us to share their story.

The Weather And Hike Of The Week
Michael Fagin suggests a hike that matches the week’s weather forecast.

Wilderness Survival Guide

Jul 18, 2013
Flickr Photo/Dois Espressos

With the summer sun, more people are hitting the trails and enjoying the outdoors. But just because the weather is nicer doesn’t mean the wilderness is any safer. Lee Callahan shares what it was like to get lost in the woods at night. Then Jason Knight, co-founder of Alderleaf Wilderness College, talks to Ross Reynolds and callers about how to survive out in the wilderness.

KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Sakara Remmu On Zimmerman's Acquittal
The verdict in the George Zimmerman trial sparked protests, copious editorials and even riots across the country this week with many voices calling for more dialogue around racism in the US. To that end, we speak with local activist, writer and self-described “mother of black children” Sakara Remmu.

Mayoral Candidate Kate Martin
Seattle Mayoral candidate Kate Martin joins Weekday to discuss the issues she feels are important to the city ahead of the August primary.

Chuck Klosterman On Grappling With Villains
What is is about the bad guy, or girl, that’s so alluring?  From Robert Redford and Paul Newman as con men in “The Sting” to the murderous drug dealer Omar Little of HBO’s “The Wire,” we have an increasing fascination with the villains in our culture.  At least, that’s what writer Chuck Klosterman thinks.  He expands on his ideas in a new book called “I Wear The Black Hat: Grappling with Villains (Real and Imagined)."

The Weather And Hike Of The Week
Michael Fagin suggests a hike that matches the week’s weather forecast.

From Seattle Brain Cancer Walk's Facebook page.

New Music Picks
Are you stuck in a music listening rut? Music writer Jonathan Zwickel is here to help you branch out. He recommends two Seattle electronic music artists with an aeronautical theme.

In Memoriam: Dr. Foltz On Brain Cancer
Dr. Greg Foltz dedicated over 25 years of his life to brain cancer research and treatment.  He was the director of the Ivy Brain Tumor Center and he founded Seattle’s annual Seattle Brain Cancer Walk.  Dr. Foltz died last Thursday, a short time after receiving a pancreatic cancer diagnosis.  

The Weather And Hike Of The Week
Michael Fagin suggests a hike that matches the week’s weather forecast.

Flickr Photo/Dan4th Nicholas

U.S. Supreme Court Rules on Voting Rights Act
The U.S. Supreme Court issued another of its long-awaited decisions, this one on the landmark 1964 Voting Rights Act. The Court ruled 5-4 to strike down a provision of the law that involves federal oversight for states with a history of racial discrimination in voter registration. How might the ruling affect current charges of voter suppression? We talk with attorney and voting rights advocate Brenda Wright.

New Music Recommendation
Are you stuck in a music listening rut?  We are surrounded by new music and innovative artists.  Branch out! Paul De Barros, critic for the Seattle Times, recommends jazz violinist Zach Brock.

What’s In Your Food?
Take a look at a food label. Under the list of ingredients there are sure to be items you recognize, but what about polyglycerol? Aspartame? Or phosphoric acid? The Food Additives Amendment of 1958 was enacted to make sure chemical ingredients were safe for consumption, but how does the FDA monitor all of the chemicals and ingredients food producers use? Professor Marion Nestle, from the department of nutrition food studies and public health, explains what goes into the food we consume and how to be a more informed consumer.

The Weather And Hike Of The Week
Michael Fagin suggests a hike that matches the week’s weather forecast.

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