higher education

Ross Reynolds speaks with University of Washington spokesman Norm Arkans about hazing allegations at one of the college's fraternities, Beta Thea Pi.

Reynolds also talks with Caitlin Flanagan, author of article "The Dark Power of Fraternities," about what happens when the national headquarters of a fraternity investigates one of its chapters.

Marcie Sillman talks with Inside Higher Ed reporter Colleen Flaherty about the push by the Service Employees International Union to unionize adjunct faculty members.

Flickr Photo/Trinity College (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds speaks with Andrew Rossi, director of a new documentary "Ivory Tower" that asks the question, is a college education worth the skyrocketing cost of tuition?

Rossi, himself a Harvard and Yale graduate, examines the one trillion dollar student debt (now higher than credit card debt), the reasons higher education costs more, and the shake-out out that could take down many smaller liberal arts colleges.

Flickr Photo/javacolleen (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to Connie Broughton with the Board for Community & Technical Colleges about competency-based education. Students with prior work experience or college credit could potentially earn an associate's degree in business in only 18 months.

Flickr Photo/Curtis Cronn (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to Seattle Times reporter Katherine Long about tuition increases in Washington since the beginning of the recession. According to the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, the state's four-year public colleges have experienced the second-highest tuition hike in the country.

Flickr Photo/miss_usa_redneck

Marcie Sillman talks with Kristen Lombardi, investigative reporter for The Center For Public Integrity, about the federal government's investigation into 55 universities, including Washington State Univerity, over their  handling of complaints of sexual assault.

Weighing in at more than $1 trillion, student loan debt is now larger than total credit card debt. Morning Edition recently asked young adults about their biggest concerns, and more than two-thirds of respondents mentioned college debt. Many say they have put off marriage or buying a home because of the financial burden they took on as students.

If you want to get an earful about paying for college, listen to parents from states where tuition and fees have skyrocketed in the last five years. In Arizona, for example, parents have seen a 77 percent increase in costs. In Georgia, it's 75 percent, and in Washington state, 70 percent.

Flickr Photo/ninniane

David Hyde talks with University of Houston history professor Robert Zaretsky about grade inflation and why it's hard to avoid doing it.

Flickr Photo/Curtis Cronn (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Seattle University political science instructor Larry Cushnie about his efforts to organize a union for adjunct faculty members.

Marcie Sillman talks with Scott Jaschik, editor and founder of Inside Higher Education, about how a student's wealth can affect the college admission process.

Courtesy of HUMV/Sarah Koopai

For Tom Jenkins, a senior at the University of Washington and a veteran of the Air Force, the partial government shutdown has caused double stress: He has been furloughed from his part-time job as a reservist, and he may not receive veteran’s benefits.

Flickr Photo/Lucius Beebe Memorial Library

Many low-income students rely on need-based scholarships and grants to pay for college. But in recent years, universities across the country — and often states themselves — are turning away from need-based financial aid. Increasingly, they’re awarding student aid based on merit. Nationally, 29 percent of all student aid is now merit based. That number has nearly tripled over the past 20 years.

Catherine Rampell is an economics reporter for The New York Times. She talked with David Hyde about what's behind the trend.

Courtesy of HUMV/Sarah Koopai

The government's partial shutdown has put many federal benefits at risk, including education benefits for veterans covered by the Post 9/11 GI Bill. That money goes towards tuition, housing, books and more.  Steve Scher talks with Tom Jenkins, a senior at UW and president of Husky United Military Veterans about how the shutdown is affecting student veterans.